Military power obsolete: RMHUniversity of Chicago, June 27, 195031Warns against suppression ofindependent thought, critics“The day of force as the determining factor in worldaffairs ended with our atomic monopoly.”So spoke the University’s Chancellor, Robert M. Hutchinsbefore the second convocation for June 1950 graduatesheld recently. Pointing to the encouragement of “inde¬pendent; thought and criticism as the best demonstrationof the vitality of the truthsinscribed in our hearts” asthe path of world leadership,Hutchins warned that we are in¬stead suppressing them. This pro-Ttxt followsFollowing is an abridged text ofthe address:This country has been thrust againstits wUl into a position of leadership lacess of insisting on the conformity the world. To hold such a positionof our citizens will undermine de-j 1. ence and education. The experiencemocracy, he told the graduates, the United states has had has been 80will make our universities “deten- siiEht that no European naticm w(wid^ „ regard it as any experience at all.. ;Ourtion homes for the young. prosperity has rested largely on our“If we can avoid blundering into internal market. Our eyes havebeen fastened on the development ofStudent Union sponsors partiesto introduce students regionallyStudent Union will sponsor a series of three parties beginning Wednesday, June 28, ......... ....in Ida Noyes Hall, to enable all students, both new and old, to become better acquainted. omseives into it oS“own"v^Tterrit»rre8T"we"jv€re*imThe first affair will take place from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. in the patio, featuring the Mid- '' ——^western States.Everyone who attends will receive appropriate souvenirs, such as miniature rubbertires from Akron, Ohio, maize products from genuine Indian corn, Meerschaum pipes^ ^ ^ ^ - from Missouri, and thumbChild-youth guidance underconsideration at local confabtacks for carpenters. Anyonewho is hungry will also re¬ceive a real mid - western ham¬burger, in cans, of course.Soittkem styleJuly 6 from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m.Problems of children and youth wfil be discussed at the the party win feature the South-Fourteenth Annual Conference on Guidance and Person- em states. Anyone who has a yennel Services, at Belfield Hall, 5835 Kimbark Avenue, Room for mint juleps, the Confederate159. Robert C. Woellner, Director of Vocational Guidanceand Placement is Chairman of the Conference. ~The Conference will deal with surveys of up-to-date ob¬servations concerning theproblems of children andyouth and will present the plansfor the Midcentury White HouseConference In Washington. Byacquainting the delegates with theconferences proposals they will beprepared for the forthcoming de¬liberations,fivtt MStioNThe first session will start at9:30 ajn., June 29, and will beled by C. A. Michelman, Chief, ofOccupational Information andGuidance Service, Board of Edu¬cation, State of Illinois. The topicwi!l be the plans for the Midcen¬tury White House Conference onChildren and Youth on the na¬tional, state and local communitylevels.The afternoon sessions will takeup some implications of the clientcentered approach to the confer¬ence in Washington.Wkat hov« wt iMrned?On June 30 the delegates willdiscuss “What have we learnedfrom our guidance and personnelexperiences in dealing with out-of-school youth?” and “youth prob¬lems and their possible solutionsas observed by the educational in¬stitutions and government agen¬cies.”aEveryone Interested in guidanceand personnel services can attendall sessions of the conference.No fee will be charged.Peace drivehits stridethis weekToM«t to sfark tke drive forfivo milliofi fignotures to thoStockholm pcoce pledge will b« setep ON compMS next week hy theYPA, sponsoriNg orgonixotioN oftho compos drive.Tim World Pooce Appeal, tho"Sto^holm Pooco Pledge” fot-loxft:”We demood tho onconditfonolprohibitfON of tho Atomic Weeponos ON iasttomeNt of oggresstoNsmd moss oxtermiNOtioN of ho-NMN heiNfs."We coll for the msfitutioN ofstrict internotioNol control to en¬force this."We will regord os guilty ofwor crimes ogoinst humonity thatfovomment which first uses thoAtomic Weopon ogoinst ony coun¬try."We coll upon oU people ofgood will oil over the world tosign this oppeol.”ford to miss this one. The famoussouthern hospitality has now ex¬tended all the way to Chicago, andthe SU hopes to entertain a fullhouse.Finally, July 8 from 5 to 7 p.m.an East-West picnic will be heldIn the Ida Noyes garden. Every¬one who lives either East of theMississippi or West of the Missis¬sippi is invited to attend. Theusual picnic fare will be served,complete with hamburgers, realones this time, but since an over- , .. . . .now crowd s expected aU those ‘’“''"bedwho plan to attend are asked to .... ... , ,sign up in the Student Union office f.e<l«“re the protection of in-on the third floor of Ida NoyesGym. On this occasion, a squaredance is also being offered in theevening, so a small assessment willhave to be made, both for the pic¬nic and the dance.Fouitk yoorThis marks the fourth successiveyear the Student Union has pre¬sented the summer series of par¬ties, which serve not only to inte-or scaring the Russians into it, we pregnable. We were spwed the neces¬sity of acquiring experience.We all know what American educa¬tion has been. II has been a mervelousthing, for It has rested on the faiththat everybody should be educated, andits inadequacy to our present tasksshould not blind us to the originalityand power of the spirit that has ani¬mated it since the Northwest OrdinanceThe ideal that everybody should beeducated has called forth an effort inmass education unparalleled ig history.The practical difficulties of recruitinga staff and building a plant and theintellectual difficulties of framing acourse of study have been so great thatwe have largely abandoned the effort tofind out what educaton is and what it isfor and have seemed to conclude thateducation means being in school andthat what goes on there does not mattermuch anyway.Approisol 4iHicttltBut thi.'i conclusion \is to be taken astemporary, reflecting the groping of acountry struggling toward the attain¬ment of a noble aim without a modelto guide It. It Is always hard to appraisethe results of education, for we cannotyet tell with sny assurance what hasdetermined the usefulness of one manand the worthlessness of another. Inthis country, it is particularly hard toappraise education, because we have hadsuch great resources and so many op¬portunities that we could have an edu¬cational system that was innocuous,or even harmful, without feeling it, oreven knowing it.We must admit that our educationhas been very little of that philosoph¬ical, historical kind which would eta-able us to understand what is going onin the world and to exercise an in¬formed, critical judgment upon it. Inthe absence of education and experienceour first reaction in the face of a to¬tally new situation is fear, fear of theunknown and uncomprehended.The basic convictions of Americansare stated most concisely in the Declar-(Conrinued on Fogo 2)NBC to broadcast readingconference,^ Cray to leadRobert M. Hutchinsmay be able to generate enoughindependent thought within thecountry to provide the world witha demonstration of a nation livingin the hearts of all men.Itstitutions of higher learning fromthose who wish to convert themfrom centers o f Independentthought into nursery schools.”Today through Friday the University will be the site olgrate new students into the com- thirteenth annual Reading Conference under the direc-of profcssor William S. Gray of the education depart-ei AnttuLtitsandfacUy-mem- Headquarters will be In the MAROON office, Reyn-bers are cordially invited to at- olds 201.tend. An innovation and outstanding feature of this year’sconference will be a broad¬cast over the National Broad¬casting Company’s networkat 7:30 p.m, CDT tonight in whichtwo nationally known authors willread selections from their books togroups of children. The programwill be titled “The Parade ofBooks.”UC student ^on leave* fightsfor UN *peace oath* approvalHutchins blastsU Cal firingChancellor Robert M. Hutchinshas blasted the action of the Uni->7aBy LEROY WOLIHSA LVx A 11 A t.- 1- A , 1. Ai. wr« j • A tj- Thcmc of this year’s sessionsAn oath never to allow war to recur which was taken by the U.S. and Soviet soldiers be “Keeping Reading Pro-who met on the Elbe River in Germany on April 25, 1945, may soon become the basis grams Abreast of the Times.” Theyfor an annual world celebration in the interest of peace because of the efforts of a UC sue expected to attract at leaststudent who has taken a “leave” for the last three years to promote the idea. 40 speakers from vario^ parts ofX.* Joseph P. Polowsky, one of the soldiers who took the oath, left the University while the u.s., who will consider recentversity of California in firing 157 in Ws senior year as a botany student under the GI Bill in 1947. He has since then changes, new trends in pur-employes for refusing to sign « used up his entire savings — “hooling and resets of"voluntary loyalty oath.” and gone into debt while sentatlve to the UN. stated on J950 along with a speMh luguig Mientific investigation that have a» jr AAAVA gwAc AAAvw « a the adoption of Polowsky s idea, bearing upon the teaching of read-Hutchins, in- New York, had this working ceaselessly to get the April 25,1949 that it seems to me . . - . ingto say when the news broke Pri- tojjowine resolution passed by the Important that we remember these "poiowi*” imTLt the campus These developments will be ex-"•JL' .UN General Assemoiy. historic occasions (April 25. this summer before leaving for amined to determine the kinds offhori is WOTse RosoImHon texi , 1945^ success where he hopes that changes in current reading pro-nothinTto^do whh a man’s^Lalf "The General Assembly recom- founded), both of which the next session of the General grams and in methods of teach-A A 1 quail- mends that each year on April 25 . .. . assembly will approve of his proj- ing reading that are desirable to-ficatlon to teach. The University the United States and the Soviet ect. He figures that a neutral in day.of California s faculty is actually xTnion commemorate, with appro- successful ^striving for ^e infriviiir. f.hp inOQc of Ulc woFld s ixiostf conscrvfi* piristfc ccrsuionics tliB £iriniv0rs£iry n[i3iint0ii8(ii.C0 of p0ftC0. • # . I wishto affirm my desire that appro¬priate means be found for its(April 25) being brought to theattention of the world each year.”tive. The «iniversity is a great in¬stitution, but at this rate it won’tbe for long. This is a serious in¬dictment of the Board of Regentsand especially Dr. Sproul (GordonSproul, U. of Cal. president). Itactually questions his fortitude.Certainly it questions Dr. Sproul's ceremonies ”qualifications to head a great uni-versity.”of April 25, 1945, when their arm¬ies at the Elbe River and the gov¬ernments at San Francisco met asfriends to help open up a peacefulworld: recommends that otherstates members of the United Na-the cold war should introduce the In addition to general sessions,resolution and hopes that Romulo five sectional meetings will be heldmay do so. Then neither the U.S.nor the USSR would be embar¬rassed at accepting the proposalwhich both have already endorsedfor teachers and school officersinterested in reading problemsfrom the primary grades to thecollege level.Professor Gray' describes the2. Similar assurances on the principle _part of Jacob A. Malik Soviet UN Polowsky’s only complaint about conference as “the most signifi-tions join in the commemorative representative on behalf of his gov- results of the task he has taken cant in the field of reading heldupon himself is that “everybody anywhere in the country.” ItPolowsky now sees enough hope 3. Public statements by Herbert pats you on the back, and that’s serves not only as an opportunityof success in his endeavor to ven- V. Evatt and Charles P. Romulo’, as far as it goes.” One of the pats for the people tc learn about read-oath fight, supposedly ture the prediction that he will be past and present presidents of the came from a university chancellor ing, he points out, but brings peo-vea by a compromise” setting back at his studies this fall, mis- UN General Assembly, endorsing named Robert Hutchins who Tvrote pie from all over the country toup tne voluntary” oath, threatens sion accomplished, “when the date the establishment of April 25 as ascores more at California. Thoseordered fired and those on whomaction is pending consist in largepart of personnel already givensecurity clearance for. secret work.Your statement is eloquent — the University, making it “one ofis established.” day o" commemoration. warm rongratulations " But Pni- the tett publicity stunts the Uni-Reosons for hope 4. Support from Illinois’ Sena- owsky, who lives at 1663 S. Central versity engages in.”Reasons for Polowsky’s optim- tor Douglas, who put the text of Park ave., wishes some of the pats Last year, the confab drew rep-i®*! are: “The Oath at the Elbe” into the would be financial. Hitchhiking to resentatives from 46 states and1. Warren R. Austin, U.S. repre- Congressional Record on April 25, Lake Success might be tough. five foreign countries.Fage 2THE CHICAGO MAROONTuesday, June 27, 1950iMued O1IC0 weekly by the publisher. The Chicago Maroon, at the publicationoffice, 570C South UniTcrslty Avienue, Chicago 37. Illinois. Telephones: EditorialOffice, Midway 3-0800, Ext. 1012: Business and Advertising Offices, Midway3-0800, 1011. Distributed free of charge, and subscriptions by mail, |1 p«rfuarter, f3 per year.CHARLES GARVINEditorJAMES E. BARNETTBusiness AdvisorBOS DAVENPORTBusiness ManagerNote from the EditorBy CHARLES GARVINLooking at the campus now it is hard to believe thatjust a few days ago these quiet walks and deserted roomscould have been the scenes of crowds and running students.Gone are many of the campus politicians, young collegekids and active members of this and that. What remainsis a rather sober crew, intent on its studies or resolved toget some minor courses out ■of the way.There will of course bemany activities for those who wishto participate but these will im¬press one with none of the do or much to remember as we appraisedie spirit of a month ago. One our empty office. The MAROONerage would do well to contact ussoon before we head for the beach.MAROON fought a lotWe in Reynolds Club 201 havecan predict that some political had been the scene of many heftycampaign will hit the campus, forinstance, but these will be of acampaigns and •contioversies inthis year as in others. Not beingmore orderly sort than those dur- without influence we have feudeding the j%ar. The peace movement with student governments, facul-at UC will continue and summer ties and in a manner with the ad-students will be asked to sign ap- ministration itself,peals distributed by such sources This editor, too, has causes toas the Red Cross and the groups promote. In particular he wouldspringing from the Stockholm like to play up the “C” campaign.Conference. Students will notice that manyAcfiyifics golore stores carry a sticker consisting ofExamining the calendar, we see a white “C” on a red field. Thisit filled with social events, movies, means that the particular businesstrips, receptions, conferences and does not discriminate against anymeetings. Unless, however, some minority in its selling policies. Thechange occurs, nothing that takes idea for the sticker was mainlyplace will have quite the pompos- that the Civil Liberties Commit-ity, or being kinder, grandeur of tee of our Student Government,the nine months preceding. This Shoppers are urged to buy at thestatement excludes those intel- sign of the “C” and to questionlectual presentations planned for persons who do not display it.our vacationing teachers, social As a parting word, we wouldworkers, etal. like to solicit as ever contributionsThe MAROON, too, is part of to our “Letters to the Editor” col-this new scene. We will lazily en- umn. Foreign students in particu-dow our readers with two printed lar, this summer, might let usissues, this one and another at the know their reactions to our schoolbeginning of August. To fill in for and city through this medium,notices of Student Union extrava- Those who are just here for Julyganzas and other noteworthy and Au-mst should not hold backevents our staff will publish a in expressing their opinions onplanographed paper at two week anything from Peace to “Don’t Sitintervals and those desiring cov- on the Grass.”Over the. hill |By HILLEL BLACKOne day I was passing time picking the pockets of apool table in the Reynold’s Club, when I stumbled uponan old friend, Cleopatra Elite.‘‘Howd’ you do?” I said in my best formal English.Cleo adjusted her beret and hitched up her HopalongLevis while a trickle of tobacco juice dribbled down theends of her chin. “I’m a-readin’,” she drawled, “a the evening untymg him.”mighty fine tome. How to “it was all too deep for me, sheElevate Your Mina by a fellercalled Adler. The man in the ‘.‘But Cleo,’ I asked ‘ aren’t youbookstore told me if you wtvnt to toego from the lower middle to the monastery of . theXnd 'thr^SieCleo cocked her head to one sidei'n.t Artii?! riivetoii "eJ and spat out a Wad of tobacco thatjust read Adler s Elevated. Er-eoo ” she added “vou can have ^^*^®^keted off an eight ball,goo, sne added, you can nave rod,” she chortledthe biggest brain in the crowd,chuck full with great ideas.”while we headed towards Jimmy’s.the totSl ta*yo!rpencil.-“'’'Lucky Cleo, Adler’s Elevated isstill stuck in the basement.Classified Adslobes and tell me some more“Why natch,” she said. “Youknow how miserable I used to feelat those UC parties where theydid nothing but talk.”“Remember the time the stu-dents from the Oriental Institute i nice lauge front apt. 1st noorproved that George ^mard Shawwas descended from King Tut and rcwms — 62i6 ingieside, 2nd fl. Mrs.how the cute boy with the horn O’Brien.rimmed bifocals explained the 2V2 room apt, on 2nd floor with nicetheory of relativity by drawing a porch. €026 ingieside. see man-picture with six dimensions andhow he tied nimself up in a knot sale. Girl’s 26" Hercui^ bike mand we had to spend the rest 01 carrying child, $40, mu 4-0392.Hutchins.. . .(Continued from pp.ge 1)atlon of Independence. “We hold these,truths to be self evident, that all menare created equal, that they are endowedby their creator with certain unalien¬able rights, that among these «are life,liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.That to secure these rights govern¬ments are instituted among men. deriv¬ing their Jvist powers from the consentof the governed.”Now suddenly we find ourselves, with¬out experience and without much edu¬cation, facing a power whose leadersregard as false the truths inscribed onour hearts. ...The struggle is wie for the loyaltyand support of mankind as we movetoward the realization, on a world scale,of the truths inscribed on our hearts.This Is not primarily a military struggle.Though the Russans have not neglectedmUltary preparations, their propagandasuggests that they know the struggle Isnot prlmarUy military. When they ex-plod^ their first atomic bomb, they didnot say that they were going to killeverybody with it. They said- that theywere going to move mountains. Irrigatewhole ccmtlnents, and make the desertto blossom as the rose. Their mostcharacteristic pose is that of harbingersof a new day of peace and plenty.Militory idea explodedThe whole conception of military pow¬er as decisive exploded with the firstRussian atomic boifcb Military powerIs of value when it enables you to dosomething to somebody else that hecannot do to you at about the sametime to about the same exttent. ButWilliam Laurence of the New YorkTimes estimated long ago that if theRussians could set off fifty primitiveatomic bombs In this country theycould kill forty million Americans Pre¬sumably If a hydrogen bomb can bemade, the Russians can make It, andcan then achieve the same effect withfive or six bombs. The day of force Isthe determining factor In world affairsended with our atomic monopoly.Yet the truths Inscribed on our heartsare overlaid with a deep stratum ofwhat we like to call realism, which Islittle but stubborn conventionality.Since military power is the ancient andtime-honored way of being strong, wemust have It, and have more of It thenanybody else, even though It will nowweaken ua and delude ua, and eventhough it is irrelevant to the kind ofstruggle in which we are engaged.In addltlca to the vain and irrelevanteffort to build up overwhelming militarypower, we have begun an unprecedentedattempt to ensure the conformity ofour citizens. That Is, of course, whollyinappropriate to the struggle In whichwe are engaged, for the liberty inscribedon our hearts has traditionally Includedfreedom of thought, speech, and associa¬tion, and now, if ever. Is the time toshow the world the power and realityof our devotion to these principles. Wehave become Instead the prisoners ofour own propaganda, and It Is smallconsolation that the State Department,which Is responsible for much of thepropaganda, has become, through Sena-for McCarthy, a conspicuous victim ofIt.The proce.ss of insisting on the con¬formity of our citizens will underminedemocracy, because, as Professor Taw-ney has said, the foundation of democ¬racy Is that sense of spiritual independ¬ence which nerves the Individual tostand alone against the powers of thisworld. The consequences of dissent InAmerica today are so serious as to un¬nerve and Intimidate the individual,whether he Is a government official, auniversity president, or a private citizen.Instead of encouraging Independentthought and criticism as the best de¬monstration of the vitality of the truthsinscribed on our hearts, we are busilyengaged In suppressing them. The ef¬fort to exact a special oath from thefaculty of the University of Californiaand to attach security riders to the Na¬tional Science Foundation Bills por¬tends the gravest dangers to the higherlearning in America, for It can fiour-ish only If criticism can flourish. If itIs impossible for a man to be a pro¬fessor unless he holds views that themajority will approve, then the Ameri¬can universities will become little morethan detention homes for the young,with technical schools attached. Theintellectual level of a detention homeIs perhaps not of much importance. TheImportant thing Is that the Inmates bedetained. But the technological recordof totalitarian countries suggests thateven a technical school cannot longmaintain a high standard of technicalactivity if the staff Is subjected toother tests than the requirement thatIt be able to do the work expected of it.Obsessed with bombsWe have been so obsessed with hypo¬thetical hydrogen bombs and the pos¬sible aberrations of minor officials thatwe have failed to notice that there Is agreat revolution going on In the world.The question Is whether It shall be arevolution that rests on devotion to thetruths Inscribed on our hearts and endswhere the American Revolution endedor one that uses the slogans of Com¬munism and ends where the RussianRevolution ended. The faith of ourfathers was that the truths inscribedon our hearts were Inscribed on thehearts of all men; Thomas Jefferson didnot believe that he was Inventing any¬thing. The truths he spoke of wereself-evident. He explained the separa¬tion of the colonies from England interms to which he expected the Instan¬taneous assent of mankind.• I believe that the truths of the Dec¬laration of Independence are self-evi¬dent. I believe that they still awakenan Instantaneous response in the heartsof all men. I believe that they consti¬tute the best weapon In the struggleIn which we are engaged.If they are to be an effective weapon^we have to live by them. And. If weare to live by them, we have to under¬stand them. Though these truths areself-evident, they are not self-explana¬tory and self-operating. Here we face'I wont my boy to bo normolla Jxost of basic problems. Is equalitymerely equality of opportunity, and doesequality of opportunity mean merelythat everybody shall have an equalchance to get the best of everybodyelse? Dofs liberty mean simply doingas you please without interference fromthe government and without any re¬sponsibility to the community? Is thepursuit of happiness merely the pursuitof my happiness? If I pursue my privateadvantage am I pursuing happiness, andshall I, in pursuing my private advan¬tage. be led by an invisible hand topromote the common good? Ddht hap¬piness consist In the possession of re¬frigerators. washing machines, and auto¬mobiles. with a set of the EncyclopaediaBrltannica thrown in? Does the factthat governments are Instituted to se¬cure our rights mean that I have theright to demand anirthlng from thegovernment that I and my pressureroup want, while at the same timeand my pressure group insist in thename of liberty on freedom from thegovernment?Truths to surfocoWe need to bring to the surface thetruths inscribed on our hearts and vig¬orously reinterpret and apply them; forwe know that we have no longer thesimple agrarian society of 1776 Nowwe must find out whether competitioncan be a substitute for justice, andwhether. If Indolence and the love ofmoney are the twin curses of mankindthe way to overcome the first Is toappeal to the second. We must dis¬cover, some means of avoiding the con¬clusion of Bernanos, that a mechanicalcivilization produces merchandise anddevours men. Is there a way In whichmodern man will be able to live with¬out becoming daily less and less human?What Is the relation of private profitand the needs of the community in anindustrial age? How can we now accom¬modate the legitimate demands of so¬ciety and the Imprescriptible rightsof the human person? How can weintegrate the currents of contemporaryideas and modem scientific knowledgein a more ordered vision of the worldand arrive at a synthesis that, whilepreserving variety and difference, laysthe foundation for understanding,communication, and community, withinour own country and throughout theworld? These are hard questions, andthe frivolity of American education Isrevealed by the fact that In Its desireto gratify popular whims it has not pre¬pared our people even to discuss thesequestions or to take them seriously.The difficulty with acquiring experi¬ence is that under modern conditionsone false move can lead to calamity.The difficulty with education is that Ittakes time.If we can avoid blundering into war,or talking ourselves into it, or scaringthe Russians into it, we may have thetime. We may then be able to generateenough independent thought within thecountry so that we can provide theworld with a demonstration of a nationliving by the truths that are Inscribedon the hearts of all men. This will re¬quire the protection of our institutionsof higher learning from those who wishto convert them from centers of inde¬pendent thought Into nursery schools.It will require the most drastic recon¬sideration and reformation of our edu¬cational program. The way Is long andhard; but the alternative is a catas¬trophe.Members of Hie grouofing doss:Your university has tried to help youbegin to gain the kind of education thatthe American people at this day require.You have learned what the basic ques¬tions are, what the possible answersmav be. and how to start the effort tofind them for yourselves. You knowthat the answers cannot be discovered,perhaps the questions cannot be «6m-prehended, in youth. In America allmen are rulers. One of the greaA tasksbefore you Is to continue to educateyourselves so that you may become thekind of rational rulers In whom Platosaw the only hope for the human race.Your Alma Mater salutes you ss youleave her halls. May her spirit attendyou and her life enrich your own. Ac¬cept now her benediction and remem¬ber her wHh that affection which shewill always feel toward you.BOOKSTORE NOTICEThe Bookstore will be Closed after } P.M. on SATURDAYSfrom July 8,. 1950, to September 30, 1950WASHThe Easy Modern Way9 lbs.Washed andFluffed DrySpeciol Summer Roles for SludenisShowing ID CordWOODLAWNLAUNDROMAT1350 E. 61st Street Easy ParkingHours: 8 to .8 Daily — 8 to 6 SaturdayTheatre-Sports TicketsAuto License ServiceNotary PublicVarsityTicket ServiceWoodworth's Book Store1311 E. 37th St. MUscum 4-1677CHOPPED LIVER DAILYKNISHES 10c - 15cKREPLACH 20cKNAYDLACH Like Mother's . . . . 20cWAFFLES 30cHome Coohei Summer Meal*J. B. KOSHER STYLE RESTAURANT1004 E. 55th StreetOUT OF PRINTPUBLISHER'SBOOKSREMINDERSNEW BOOKS— USED BOOKSCLARKand CLARKBOOKSELLERS1204 E. 55th St.Ph. HYda Park 3-032110 A.M.to 9 P.M. EverydayTtfet^ay, 27, 1950THE CHICAGO MAROONRage 3'j^olscular fncdicino age StudentUnUm offers summerseen at Coldblatt openingprogram with wide varietyMankind stands at the threshold of an age of “molecular medicine” which can suc¬cessfully attack cancer and heart disease, Linus Pauling told the scientific conferencehonoring the dedicatign of the University of Chicago’s Nathan Goldblatt MemorialHospital.Pauling, internationally known professor of chemistry from the California Instituteof Technology, asserted that 'ofTo rtf *<mrtirtr»iiiQr tvioHi molecules — in the main by .the diseases. Many, through the pow-ine age ox moiecuiar meai- ^re called enzymes, er of his intellect will overcomecine will begin- when we Each of these enzymes is a pro- that great scourge, cancer.”succeed in obtaining a' detailed un- tein, composed of thousands of William V. Gardner of Yale, not-derstanding of the structure of the atoms.” ed for his work on the influencegiant molecules that make up the ‘‘When a detailed understanding of the glands and hormones inviiiman hnHv anH rancincr the structure of proteins has cancer, paid tribute to basic re¬human body and disease-causipg obtained—and I believe this searches of University of Chicagoorganisms. ^ ^ave been achieved before an- scientists in this field.Gionf molecules importonf other decade has passed — this Cites KochPauling pointed out the import- knowledge will be used in obtain- He cited biochemist Fred Kochance of the study of giant mole- ing a far more detailed and pre- for his isolation of the principlesules by saying, “The work of the cise structure of the nature not of the male sex hormone, Dr.human body is done by these giant only of health but also of di^ase, Charles Huggir.' for his work onand of the action of drugs.” the influence of sex hormones onLogicol oHock prostate cancer, and zoologists CarlPauling concluded, “It will be Moore and Dorothy Price, whopossible to make a straightforward established relationships betweenlogical attack on the degenerative the pituitary and sex glands.tOCAl AMO iOMO DM7AMCf MAUifMO40 VIA*i Of OMMOAMfimvKt 70 nm unmatotAm fot mm unmAn55fh and ELLIS AVENUECHICAGODAVID L. SUTTON, Pros.Butterfield 8-6711DR. iLS R. mimASSOCIATES1138 E. 63rd HY 3-5352OPTOMETRISTS «md OPTICIANS—o—• Discounts to NSA purchase card holders• Eye examination and glasses• Rapid and accurate optical repairingV/OODWORTH'S1311 E. 57th St. 2 Blocks East Mondcl HallCOMPLETE SUPPLIES SUMMER STUDENTS —TEXT BOOKS new & usedFor Your Convenience—POSTAL STATION RENTAL LIBRARYTHEATRE TICKET SERVICEOpen Evenings — Monday, Wednesday, FridayOpen Saturday — All DayRook store— 1311 E. 57th St. —LINCOLN MERCURYIN HYDE PARKSpecializing In Ford ProductsWE SERVICE AND REPAIRALL MAKES OF AUTOSSIMONIZERODY AIVD FENDER WORKFactory Trained MechanicsLAKE PARK MOTORS, me5601 HARPER AVE.S. TAUBER, PresidentE. KAPLAN, TreosurerThe first of two Student Unionsquare dances will be held in theIda Noyes Gymnasium on Satur¬day, July 8, 8 p.m.Beginners are welcome and in¬vited to try the^ hands or feet atthe dance. There will be specialinstruction for their benefit byqualified callers and old time ad¬vocates of the true American wayof the dance.All the latest and oldest swingsand twirls will be attempted.For those beginners who areafrsdd to begin without any pre¬vious experience, lessons will beheld on Thursday, June 29, andThursdays thereafter.Ida open houseshows facilitiesThis Wednesday’s open housewill introduce the facilities of IdaNoyes Hall to summer quarter stu¬dents. All the recreational facili¬ties of the hall will be open from7 until 10 p.m.There will be skating in thegymnasium, skates being provided;swimming in the swimming pool,suits being provided; bowling atthe bowling alleys, balls beingprovided, and the table tennisrooms will also be available. Forthose adverse to strenuous activ¬ity, bridge playing, chess andcheckers will be available.During the remainder of thesummer these recreational facili¬ties will be open at specified hoursduring the week. Ida Noyes Hallhas a schedule of activities whichlists such open hours.running through August 15, Mrs,Smith will instruct all those menand wozpfen who are somewhatfamiliar with the game and wishto improve.Instruction is from 7 to 8 p.m.and - supervised play will followtill 9.Register at the main desk inIda Noyes Hall not later than July10th because the class is limitedto 60. There will be a nominal fee.SU to sponsorstudent tourneysStudent Union will sponsor atable tennis tournament on Mon¬day, July 3, at 7 p.m., in the IdaNoyes hall game room. Preregis¬tration will be held all this week atthe Ida Noyes check room on thefirst floor of the building. Thoseinterested in competing shouldregister by noon on July 3.The table tennis tournament isthe first of a series of Mondaynight tournaments sponsored byStudent Union. Others .scheduledare a bowling tournament on July17 and a bridge tournament onJuly 24.During the second t«^rm of thesummer quarter the followingtournaments are scheduled. Aug¬ust 7, table tennis; August 14,bowling; August 21, bridge. Watchthe MAROON and the bulletinboards for notices of registration.Turkey Run—here we comeStudent Union’s outing depart¬ment will lead a campus migrationto Turkey Run, Indiana Saturday.The lovers of nature who tag alongwill stay for the weekend, ^rtherinformation on the camping tripmay be had at the SU ofiice, IdaNoyes.Shop at the Sign of the “C**addictsoffered trainingJosephine Walters Smith, one ofEly Culbertson’s pets of the bridgetable will instruct all potential“fourths for bridge” in the IdaNoyes library in a series of sixlessons this summer.Starting Tuesday, July 11, andInternational House planseight trips around Chicago/Eight trips to points of interest around Chicago havebeen planned by International House for foreign studentsand for those who wiM be in Chicago for only the summerquarter. A picnic supper and concert at Ravinia will beginthe series on Tuesday, July 11. William Kapell, pianist,will be the soloist.On Sunday, July 16, agroup will visit the ChicagoLake Front Fair composed ofexhibits depicting the agriculture,industry, science and commerce ofAmerica. Baseball at WrigleyField is next on the agenda onJuly 23.A west side tour of slum hous¬ing will take place on July 27' dur¬ing which Skid Row, Maxwell st.and the Jane Addams Housingproject will be seen. On July 8,the Carnegie-Illinois Steel Plantwill be toured, August 10 has beenscheduled fo’* another visit toRavinia, August 18 carries a tripto Northwestern University andthe series will be climaxed witha trip to Brookfield Zoo on Au¬gust 27.Reservations may be made withMrs. McNeer at InternationalHouse and should be turned in asmuch as possible before the dateof the trip.ESCORTED TOUR SCHEDULESummer QuarterAir Conditioned Butes Used On All ToursChinotown — 4-hour lecture tour includingChinese dinner. Wed., June 28th, 6:30 p.m.Price $2.98Chicogo at Nite—4-hour nite life observationtour, including refreshment stops. Fri., June30th, 7:00 p.m. Price $2.50Chicogo by Day—4-hour general tour coveringmajor points of interest. (Picnic lunch includ¬ed). Sot., July 1st, 10:(X)a.m. Price $2.50Special Rovinio Concert Tours—Every Saturdayevening. Price includes $1.25 Gen. Admission.Depart 6:45 p.m. Price $2.98All Tours Depart from Mandel Hall (57tli and University)at Times SpecifiedVARSITY TICKET SERVICEWOODWORTH'S BOOK STORE1311 E. 57lh Street MUseum 4-1677I Chicago 37, Illinois■ ' 'ii'- •THE CHICAGO MAftOONTw»4«y, J«iM 27, ITsqCARE polls helperson division of fundsReporter aids restive studentswith tips on Chicago*s lifeCampus CARE is attempting to make the distribution _of its 26 per cent share of the money raised by Campus lyHiU-EL black jChest during the last academic year more democratic by Early Chicago settlers must have had visions of the gigantic city of lights and litter,polling more than 200 students (CARE personnel, House where the sidewalks feel the tootsies of five million ^ople daily.* In Chicago you canChest representatives and Chest workers) as to exactly rub lapels with big shots like Colonel McCormick and Bushman.'where the packages should go. Chicago brags about itself even with the word ‘shecagou, the original Indian han-Ch^rman Jerry Green-^^ k kimeaning “strong.’' But all this chest puffing has blown into the windy city awald ^nt out a letter to all to ^parau effort wum plethora of eateries, gayety Pinte. and hot houses^ of^cujtur^those involved in raising the preferable to continuing the Chest, Afunds and accompanied it with a though the CARE committee has AQG Of 00X1617CARE booklet describing the types presented a proposal in favor of ■ •L. J ^of packages available and the cooperation.” ClOSCriDCCi fOrSo if you have a “felt need'to hit the hot spots and coddles the first-run movie houses.Hutchins put 9«‘®“pon displayat receptionhaven't handed in your tui- supplemented by foreign films, attion yet, here are some places to the World Playhouse, the Surf, thegQ * Cinema, the New Astor, with thein the realm of mustard and serving the same tone-mignon there is the Tropical Hut tion* on the South Side.Although the modern and Gordon’s. Both are between+ , Kimbark and Kenwood on 57th music, he caves of cultureworlds ability to produce st., competing in a little game «re Orchestra Hall, Civic Operashould make this the nap>- ^igh prices. On the North House, Graijt Park, Ravinia Park,piest period of mankind S side, near Rush st., you can make fhe Blue Note, >Tazz Limited, Raghistory, it is an age of anxi- believe that going to school this Silhouette, and the BeeChancellor Hutchins will hold ety, unrest and imsery, the summer wasbad nightmare andyear. All other campus chanties reception for summer Hev. Dr. Joseph Haroutun- lose yourself in platters of, " ’ ’ ■ ian, professor of systematic theol- and goblets of wine at Teddy sogy at McCormick Theological Pizzeria and Ricardo’s.Seminary, told r Convocation con- When you get a big thirst on,gregation recently. fhe pink elephant specialists re-A special section in the chapel side the Umyersity Tavern.^tAssisting the Chancellor in the was reserved at the morning serv- st. and University, and Jim-E. E. Cummings. New York poet receiving line will be Mr. and Mrs. ices for June graduates of the uni- s lurtner east,and author of 19 books, has been Alonzo Grace, Mr, and Mrs. Wll- versity and the college. ^ ir^Th T v ir • i hawarded the 1950 Harriet Monroe Ham S. Gray, and Mr. and Mrs. “Western society has come to J^^ward if nf Planners get degreesPoetry award at the University of Thorkild Jacobson. this day of peril because we have harkward and rhiraan ic innkinf i <Colwell, In keeping with the dignity of confused wisdom with science. The ^prrihiA is looking The University s planning de-terrible. When it comes to foot- partment awarded its first mastercountries to which they can besent.One paragraph of Green wald’sletter foretells a possible changein charity collection policy at theUniversity: “CARE’s perecentageof Chest proceeds wilA amount toless than $2,000, as opposed to the$7,000 raised as an independentgroup during the 1948-49 schoolhave suffered in the same pro-Cummings awardUC poetry honorquarter students in Ida Noyes gar¬den June 30. From 8:30 to 9:30p.m. Mr. Hutchins will shakehands with all those who feelstrong enough to approach.A corner wit once made theWe recommend a look behindthe scenes in Chicago, so get intouch with International Housewhich is going to vonduct tripsthrough the West Side.Oh yes, if you haven’t noticedthere is a big body of water near-called Lake Michigan, excellentfor swimming and mud baths.Chicago, Ernest Cadma:president, announced recently.The $500 prize wasthe late Mis'- Monroe, editor ofPoetry, a Magazine of Verse. Un¬der the terms of her will, the re¬cipient is chosen by a committeeof three poets, with preference go¬ing to writers of progressive ten¬dencies.recently. this event there will be no demon- wise man todav is one who has iY„v.fro‘ V awnmeu ivs ursc masterendowed by stration of loyalty other than the the knowledge and skill to possess Planing in heweird dances of our civilizationwhich will follow from 9:30 to12:30 p.m. Music for the affair willbe provided by Eddie James andhis relatives. Dates are not neces¬sary.—H. B.possessthe goods in our world. But it isprecisely such wisdom that per¬vades the folly of our age.“The essence of wisdom is faith.From faith proceeds hope; by hopely gets the boot—hand-me-downs division of social sciences at thisfrom eastern centers of culture. month’s graduation ceremonies.But if you want to play footsie They went to: Stephen H. Axilrod.and watch the current season’s Dallas, Texas; Janet Louise Lipp-efforts you can visit the following man. West End, New Jersey; Wil-legitimate theaters, Harris, Sel- liam McCormick Lundberg, 804 E.we number our days and apply wyn, Blackstone, Great Northern, 59th st.. and Tullius L. Wingo, Jr.,our hearts to wisdom. By wisdom Studebaker, and Erlanger. Tick- E. Paso, Texas,we have peace. Let us cease to say ets may be purchase^ through‘peace, peace,’ where there is no Woodworth’s Bookstore.peace.The area around Randolph st.Teaching excellence prizesgiven Bradbury, CeithamI, MeyerThree one thousand dollar prizes, awarded annually atthe University of Chicago for excellence in undergraduateteaching, were awarded to three faculty members in theCollge of the university, Chancellor Robert M. Hutchinsannounced.The 1950 recipients of the prizes, the only such awardsin the nation, were presented to: William Chapman Brad- on campus by an ad hoc body called the Committee forInternational Student Cooperation in an effort to sendseveral UC students to the Second World Congress of theInternational Union of Students in Prague next August.The group must first secure recognition by the adminis¬tration which it is now in ~leadership in business, civic and the process Of doing accord- sending invitations toing to the MAROON'S inform- world gathering, bypassed^World cooperation groupseeks campus recognitionFund-raising activities will be carried on tl\is summerbury, Jr., assistant professor of thesocial sciences; Joseph JamesCeithamI, assistant professor ofbiochemistry; and William H. L.Meyer, Jr., assistant professor ofmathematics.1938 by a New York alumnus tointerest teachers in training notonly scholars and research work¬ers but also young men and wom¬en for intelligent participation andThe prizes were inaugurated in professional life.Tuesday, June 27—The Christian Science Oiganiaationwill hold Its regular Tuesday eveningmeeting at 7;30 p.m. in Hilton Chapel.Wednesday, June 28—Inter - Varsity Christian Fellowshipsessions at the Chicago TheologicalSeminary.Wednesday, July 5—The Conference of The Teachers ofant, Dan Fox. The fund goal is toraise anything from $500 to $2,000.Previously the UC Student Gov¬ernment had taken several actionsin connection with the lUS con¬fab. The Student Assembly votedto recommend to the NationalStudents Association national staff(which has the final word on theNSA, which had disaffiliated fromit in 1948, in favor of the CISC.CISC is not, however, officiallyaffUiated with lUS.?»on1 matter) that three UCers be sentWith the topic “Have the Social Studies by NSA as observer-reporters towill sponsor an* Informal Bible study m l^ke Prague m'^eting. They are Billra umf Birenbaum. Patricia Gr^m and"“'•’'I”" Will hold try'- ?PProved asTsaSt Mim'rlaatloo" «lm ou“ In tox trot and waltz starting at a UC obMrver OttO Feinstein. whO«,rt«i in Judd 126 at 6. 8 and 2:45 p.m. ^^15 ‘c^sn’^and fik« “w d«“ “ »<> be in Prague Studying.no partner is necessary.Admission Is 60 cents.Thursday, June 29—Lower Depths will be presented bythe United World Federalists at 7:15 and9:15 in Soc. 122. Admission is 50 cents.Friday, June 30—Torment, first prize film at the 1946 the second 'lecture in theInterntional FUm Festival will be shown Government at jdideenturyby the Politics Club in Social Science122 at 6:15, 8:00 and 9:45. Admissionis so cents.* * •Chancellor Hutchins will hold hU an¬nual reception for summer quarter stu¬dents in Ida Noyes Garden from 8:30to 9:30 p.m. A dance will follow withEddie James band on the stand.Saturday, July 1—Student Union Outing Departmentwill sponsor a tour to Turkey Run StatePark. Further Information can be got¬ten from the Student Union office inIda Noyes Hall.* * •National Association for the Advance¬ment of Colored People in Soc. 122 at3:30, 7:15 and 9:15. The fee is 50 cents.Les Miserables will be offered by theMonday, July 3—science, will deliver the first lecture inthe “American Government at Mid Cen¬tury” series at 3:00 in Social Science122. He will speak on “Separation ofPowers.”4> • *The University of Chicago workshopIn Group Dynamics will begin its dallyThe Committee Against Militarizationpresents Shakespeare’s “As You Like It”in the film version at 6, 8 and 9:45 p.m.in Judd 12b. Admission is 50 cents.• « •The Congress’* will be the topic ofAmericanseries at3:00 in Social Science 122.Mondoy, July 10—The Magic Horse, the first Russianfull length color cartoon, will be shownin International House. Admission is46 cents.Wednesday, July 12—The Committee Against Militarizationpresents the film “Don Quixote” by Cer¬vantes, starring Chaliapin; in Judd 126at 6, 8 and 9:45 p.m. Fifty cents Is thecharge.BeH. Hecht’sTHE SPECTRE OF THEROSEWed., JIane 286, 8 and 9:45 P.M.JUDD 1266(hBox Office Opensat 5:00 P.M.LONG DISTANCE MOVINGMidway Shoe RepoirInvisible Half SalMShoes Dyed and Refinished24-Hour Service1017 fc. 61stBKone HYdc Pork 3-4286LOW RATES - Bonded - Insured612 No: Michigan Arc.superior 7-3484BOOKS FOR YOUR PLEASURE ANU STUDlTFOR YOUR REFERENCE LIBRARYTHE AMERICAN LANGUAGE $6.00Supplement I /.... $6.00Supplement II $7.50by H. L. MENCKENFUNDAMENTALS OF GOOD WRITING. .$4.75by ROBERT WARRENA handbook on how to think stroight obout writing.A RHETORIC OF MOTIVES .$5.00by KENNETH BURKEA new opprooch to rhetoric.MODERN AMERICAN POETRY $6.00LOUIS UNTERMETER, U.This revision contoins mony new poets.American Jewish yearbookFOR 1950 $3.95A record of events ond trends in American and world Jewish life.THEREBY HANGS A TALE $3.50by CHARLES E. FUNKStories of curious word origins.SLANG TODAY AND YESTSRDAY $5.00by ERIC PARTRIDGEREADING FOR PLEASURESee our selection of books and book packages priced atonly $1.00. Many fine fiction and non-fiction titles.FERMA BOOKS 3 for $1.00LIVING LIBRARY TITLES $1.00 eachHOLIDAY LIBRARY TITLES $1.00 eachGREAT MUSICIANS SERIES $1.00 eachNew studentM are eMpedaily invited to see our windowtor more comptete information about our very largeselection of reference works,UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO BOOKSTORE5802 Ellis Avenue%Warns against suppression ofindependent thought, criticsUnhrertity of Chicago, June 27, 1950“The day of force as the determining factor in worldaffairs ended with our atomic monopoly/’So spoke the University’s Chancellor, Robert M. Hutchinsbefore the second convocation for June 1950 graduatesheld recently. Pointing to the encouragement of “inde¬pendent thought and criticism as the best demonstrationof the vitality of the truthsStudent Union sponsors partiesto mtrbdiice students regionallyinscribed in our hearts’’ as T«»t Wiowithe path of world leadership, Following is an abridged text ofHutchins warned that we are in- the address istead suppre^ing them. This pro- iJ5;,\«u7ntocess of insisting on the conformity the world. To hold such a positionof our citizens will undermine de- without undue disquiet requires experl-1- i. ij X1- j i. ence and education. The experiencemocracy, he told the graduates, the united states has had has been sowill make our universities*‘ deten- slight that no .Turopean nation wwUd,. , . i.1.. . - »» regard It as any 'vJence at all... Ourtion homes Tor the young. prosperity has res. C largely on our“If we can avoid blundering into huge internal market. Our eyes hareStudent ^Union^will sponsor a series of three parties beginning Wednesday, June 28r uee^i fastened on the development ofin iGta Noyes Hall, to enable all students, both new and old, to become better acquainted. or talking ourselves into it our own vast territories. We were Ibi-Thc-first affair‘Will take place from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. in the patio, featuring the Mid- or scaring the Russians into it, we ™"f“%Xinrexpefc.^we.^in States.^erybn| who attends will receive appropriate souvenirs, such as nriniature rubberires from Akron, Ohio, maize products from genufhe Indian corn, Meerschaum pipesI *1 w - ^ ^ - from Missouri, and thumbihildryouth guidance underconsideraiion at local confabtacks for carpenters. Anyonewho is hungry will also re¬ceive a rear mid - western ham¬burger, in cans, of course.Southern sryieJuly 6 from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m.Problems of children and youth will be discussed atf the the party will feature the south-Fourteenth Annual Conference on Guidance and Person- ern states. Anyone who has a yennel Services, at Belfield Hall, 5835 Kimbark Avenue, Room J^int juleps, the Confederate159. Robert C. Woellner, Director of Vocational Guidance Dixie'fcan’t af-atii! Placement is Chairman of the Conference. ^ ^he famousTlie Conference will deal with surveys of up-to-date ob- hospitality has now ex-sei’vations concerning theproblems of children, andyOfiih and will present, the plansfor the Midcentury White HouseTerence in Washington. Aya( ( aiuting the delegates with thecfllTVerences proposals,„they will bepi^rpared for the forthcoming de-liO'rations. ;Fivtt settioM 'Tl^e first session will start at9.30 a m., June 29, and will beled by C. A. Michelman, Chief, OfOccupational Information andGuidance Service, Board of EdU|Kcation, State of Illinois. Tl'"’^will be the plans for the ftiTOcen-tury White House Conference onChildren and Youth on the na-tiontil, stat# and local communitylevcliiThe afternoon sessions will takeup .some- implicatfons of the clientceutered approach to the confer-enft* in Washington,Wbot hove we leorned?On June 30 the ^delegates willdiscuss “What have we learnedfrom our guidanca and personnelexperiences in dealing with out-of-•chool youth?" and “youth prob¬lems and their possible solutionsobserved by the educational In-Riitutions and gov,pj*nment agen-Peace drivehits stridethis weekTobies to Bpprk the drive forfive millioii signatures to theStockholm gooco pledge will bo sotup on compos next week by theYPA, sponsoring orgonizotien offbo compos ,dfi.xo.Tbt Wbrid Peace Appeol, the"Stockholm Pooco Pledge" fel¬lows:pioitali.domond the onconditionolprohibition of the Atomic Wcoponos on instrument of oggressionend mess extermination of hu¬man Icings.collJor the, institution ofWrick Altediaionai control to en-rarce this."Wo will rogord os gbilty ofwor crimes o^oinst humanity thatgovernment which first uses theAtomic Weopon ogoinst ony coun-,, . . ’ i by MM^AiSiths that ari* inscribed t^ble us to understand what is going oocrowd i expected all m the world and to exercise an m-'We coll upon oil people ofgood will oil over the world tosign this appeol."tended all the way to Chicag^, and-the SU hopes to entertain a fullhouse.Finally, July 8 from 5 to 7 p.m.an East-West picnic, will be heldin the Ida Noyes garden. Every¬one who lives either East of theMississippi or West of the Missis¬sippi is invited tc attend. Theusual picnic fare will be served,complete with hamburgers, realones this time, but since an over-Kokort M. Hutchinsraa^* foe atte to generate enoughindependent thought within thecountry to provide thf* world witha demonstration o;’ a nation livingWe all know what American educa¬tion has been. It has been a mervelousthing, for It has rested on the faiththat everybody should be educated; andIts inadequacy to our present tasksshould not blind us to the originalityand power of the spirit that has ani¬mated it since the Northwe.st Ordinance.The ideal that everybody should beeducated has called forth an effort inmass education unparalleled In history.The practical dlfficuUies of recruitinga staff and building a plant and theIntellectual difficulties of framing acourse of study have been so great thatwe have largely abandoned the effort tofind out what educaton is and what it Isfor and have seemed to conclude thateducation means being In school andthat what goes on there does not mattermuch anyway.Approisol difficultBut this conclusion is to be taken Mtemporary, reflecting the groping of acountry struggling toward the attain¬ment of a noble aim without a modelto guide It. It Is always hard to appraisethe results of education, for we cannotyet tell with any assurance what hasdetermined the usefulness of one manand the worthlessne.ss of another. Inthis eountry It Is particularly hard toappraise education, because we have hadsuch great resources and so many op¬portunities that we could have an edu¬cational system that was lnnocuo>.\s,or even harmful, without feeling It, oreven knowing It.We must admit that our educationhas been verj' little of that philosoph¬ical, historical kind which would em-who plan to attend are asked toi!^ the hearts of all men. , . . Itsign upln the Student'irnlonoftiM '"Ul reauiie the „(on the third floor of Ida Noyes fhigher learning fromGym. On this occasion, a square i"®® »ho wish to convert themdance is also being offered in the independentevening, so a small assessment willhave to be made, both for the pic¬nic and the dance.Fourth yeorThis marks the fourth successiveyear the Student Union has pre¬sented the summer series of par¬ties, which serve not only to inte-independentthought into nursery schools."formed, critical j idgment upon It. lathe absence of education and etperienoeour first reaction In the face of a to¬tally new situation is fear, fear of theunknown and uncomprehended.The basic convictions of Americansare stated most concisely In the Declar-(Continued! on Page 2)NBC to broadcast readingconference; Cray to leadToday through Friday the University will be the site olgrate new students into the com- thirteenth annual Reading Conference under the direc-munity, but also to entertain those professpr William S. Gray of the education depart¬ment. Headquarters will be in the MAROON office, Reyn¬olds 201.students who are already integrat¬ed. All students and faculty mem¬bers are cordially invited to at¬tend.Everyone interested in guidanceand peusonnel services can attendif scadluiis of the conference.No fee will be charged.UC student ^on leave^ fightsfor UN ^peace oath^ approval4utchins blastsJ Cal firingBy LEROY WOLINSAn innovation and outstanding feature of . this year’sconference will be a broad¬cast ovei; the National Broad¬casting Company’s networkat .7:30 p.m. CDT tonight in whichtwo nationally known authors willread selections from their books togroups of children. The programwill be titled “The Parade ofBooks.”. ^ Thiunt' of this year’s sessionsAn oath never'to allow war to recur which was taken by the U.S. and Soviet soldieK will be “Keeping Reading Pro-who met on the Elbe River in Germany on April 25, 1945, may soon become the ba;^ grams Abreast of the Times.” They.for an annual world celebration in the interest of peace because of thfe efforts of a are expected to attract at leastChancellor Robert Tbr'^Hiit.rhin.s studdHt who hos taken a “leave’’ for the last three years to promote the idea. Jo speakers from various parts ofWasted the aWiL oi the Uni- Joseph.P. Polowsky, one of the soldiers who the oath, left the University whUe ^^i^^^hange"''new'tMS’to'^-veisiiv ol California in firing 157 in his senior yffsr as a lytany student under the Gi Bill in 1947. He has since then schMling, and lesulte ofRefusing to ^gn a used up his entile savings . , " . .. ctat^d on 1950 along with a speech urging scientific investigation that have aoluntary loyalty oath. and gone 'into debt while ® adoption of Polowsky’s idea, bearing upon the teaching of read-Hutchins, in New York, had this working Cfeaselessly to get the' April 26, 1949 that it seems to me success journey^ say when the news broke Priv^ foUpwif!ej.refioI^tion passed by the important that we remember these Poiowsky will visit the campus These developments will be ex-<lay; _ UN: General As&mbly;‘ This new requirement is wo^ Resolution textthan an oath of loyalty. It has ««The General Assembly recom-nothing to do with a man's quali- mends that ea^ year on April 254-yv rwsi TT^i .two historic occasions (April 25, this sui](imer before leaving for amined to determine the kinds of1945, was also the day the UN was Lake SucVxess where he hopes that changes in 6urrent reading pro¬of ficially founded> both of which the next :?ession of the General grams and in methods of teach-4 • • assembly will approve of his proj- ing reading that are de.sirable to-to teach. The University the United States and the Soviet should serve to inspire unceasing figures that a neutral in day.irnia’.<i fariiUv i.<! arfiiiniiv tt..:,. and successiui siiiving 10 i e should introduce the In addition to general se^ions,maintenance of peace. . . . i wishfiCif’^ionof (-alifornia’s faculty is actually Union copimemorate. with approo»ie of the world’s most conserva- priate Ceremonies, the anniversary“/f-university is a great in- of April 25, 1945, when their arm- . ^ ^ ,stitution, but at this rate it won’t ies at the Elbe River and the gov- Pnate meana, be found forresolution and hopes that Romulo five sectional meetings will oe heiuto affirm mjF (’esire that appro- Then neither the U.^. for teachers and school officersSproul, U.-3-of Cal. presjil|Dt). It states members of the United Na- Part of Jacob A. Malik. Soviet UN Polowsky^’s ^nly complaint about conference as “the most signifl-tu^lly question.^^is'ilptityrt-e.' tions join in the commemorative representative on behalf of hiS gov- results of the ta§k he has taken cant in the fi^d of reading l^ldCertainly it^uestiaJfe®i^pr|ll|i'S ceremonies.” ' ernment. upon himself is that “everybody anywhere in the country." It‘J'^^ificabioiw to head a great uni- Polowsky now sees enough hope 3. Public statements by Herbert pats you* on the back, and thafs serves not only as an opportunityveraty.” c? gj success in his endeavor to ven- V. Evatt and Charles P. Romulo, .a’s far as it goes.” One of the pats for the people ti learn about read-The oath fight, suppo.sedly turi* tlie prediction that he Will fee pa.st and present presidents of y?.e came from a university chancellor ing, he °point,s out, but brings peo-.sok^ed by a “compromise” setting batik at his studies this fall, mis- UN General Assembly, endorsing named Robert Hutchhis who wrote pie from all over the country toup the “voluntary” oath, threatens sioii, accQIrpli§]i§^^, “when the date the establishment o^ April 25 as a r’Your statement is eloquent —- the University, making it “one ofTicores more at-;;^California. Those is established.’*^ o* commemoration. ^ warm congratulations.” But Pol- the best publicity stunts the Uni-ordered fired and those on whom Reasons for ’ ‘ 4. Support from Illinol&^ Sena- dWsky, who lives^’at 1G63 S. Central’ ver^ity^ engages Jii,”"tition is pending consist in large Reasons for Polowsky’s optim- tor Douglas, who put. the text of "Park ave.^wishesfsome of rtid pats "Lasj^ year^-the confab drew vep-art of personnel^ already glvert Ism are: i, .c “The Oath at^e Elbe” into the wbuh^e financial. Hitrhh«ing to resentatiVfes tr o m 46 states and''curity clearance foi^uv.cret work. 1. Warren I> Austin, U.S. ref)^- Congres.slona.]^ecord on April'25, Lak^teiccessijmight^e tougfi. ^ five foreign countries.■fi ij’ J1: 'ITHE CHICAGO MAROONpMAHitM]U fOR-d.plMJctuSaRasa 2iMued once weekly by the publisher, The Chicago Maroon, at the pubUcatton•ffice, 57M South Universtty Avenue, Chicago 37. Illinois. Telephones: EditorialOffice, Midway 3-0800, Ext. 1012; Business and Advertising Offices, iWIIdway3-0800, Ext. 1011. Distributed free of charge, and subscriptions by mail, $1 perfuarter, f3 per year.CHARLES GARVINEditorJAMES E. BARNETTBusiness AdvisorBOB DAVENPORTBusiness ManagerNote from the EditorBy CHARLES GARVINLooking at the campus now it is hard to believe thatjust a few days ago these quiet walks and deserted roomscould have been the scenes of crowds and running students.Gone are many of the campus politicians, young collegekids and active members of this and that, "^at remainsis a rather sober crew, intent on its studies or resolved toget some minor courses outof the way. - erage would do well to contact usThere will of course be soon before we head for the beach,many activities for those who wish MAROON fought a lotto participate but these will im- We in Reynolds Club 201 havepress one with none of the do or much to remember as we appraisedie spirit of a month ago. One our empty office. The MAROONcan predict that some political had been the scene of many heftycampaign will hit the campus, for campaigns and controversies ininstance, but these will be of a this year as in others. Not beingmore orderly sort than those dur- without influence we have feudeding the year. The peace movement with student governments, facul-at UC will continue and summer ties and in a manner with the ad-students will be a;^ed to sign ap- ministration itself,peals distributed by such sources This editor, too, has causes toas the Red Cross and the groups promote. In particular he wouldspringing from the Stockholm like to play up the “C” campaign.Conference. Studente will notice that manyActivities galore stoi^s carry a sticker consisting ofExamining the calendar, we see a white “C” on a red field. Thisit filled witti social events, movies, means that the particular businesstrips, receptions, conferences and does not discriminate against anymeetings. Unless, however, some minority in its selling policies. Thechange occurs, nothing that takes idea for the sticker was m^nlyplace will have quite the pompos- that the Civil Liberties Commit-ity, or being kinder, grandeur of tee of our Student Government,the nine months preceding. This Shoppers are urged'to buy at tjiestatement excludes those Intel- sign of the “C” and to questionlectual presentations planned for persons who do not display it.our vacationing teachers, social As a parting word, we Wo^dworkers, etal. like to solicit as ever contributionsThe MAROON, too, is part of to our “Letters to the Editor” col-this new scene. We will lazily en- umn. Foreign students in particu-•dow our readers with two printed lar, this summer, might let usissues, this one and another at the know their reactions to our ;5choolbeginning of August. To fill in for and city through this medium,notices of Student Union extrava- Those vvho are just here for Julyganzas and other noteworthy end August should not hold backevents our staff will publish a in expressing their opinions onplanographed paper at two week anything from PCace to “Don’t Sitintervals and those desiring cov- on the Grass.”Over the hillBy HILLEL BLACKOne day I was passing time picking the pockets of apool table in the Reynold’s Club, when I stumbled uponan old friend, Cleopatra Elite.“Howd’ you do?” I said in my best formal English.Cleo adjusted her beret and hitched up her HopalongLevis while a trickle of tobacco juice dribbled down theends of her chin. “I’m a-readin’,” she drawled, “a evening untying him.”mighty fine tome. How to “it wa« all too deep for me,” sheElevate Your Mind by a fellercalled Adler. The man in the . But Cleo,” I asked “aren’t youbookstore told me if you want to ^ last fling l^forego from the lower middle to the monastery of theupper middle without messing - t. j jaround with the middle middle Cleo c^ked her head to one sidejust read Adler’s Elevated. "Er- and spat out a wad of tobacco that»> ..Kr. “errv,, Vvovrea ncocheted off An eight bull.eoo, she added, you can have rod,” she chortledwhile we headed towards Jimmy’s.“As the Freudians say, ‘Jlere’s tothe lead in your pencil.’ *'Lucky Cleo, Adler’s Elevated isstill stuck in the basement.Classified Adsthe biggest brain in the crowd,chuck full with great ideas.”“Cleo, start flexing your frontallobes and tell me some more.”“Why natch,” she said. “Youknow how miserable I used to feelat those UC parties where theydid nothing but talk.”“Remember the time the stu-dents from the Oriental Institute i nice Large front apt. ist floorproved, that George Bernard Shawwas descended from King Tut and rooms — 62i6 ingieside, 2nd fl. Mrs.how the cute boy with the horn o Brien.rimmed bifocals explained the 2V2 room apt. on 2nd floor with nicetheory of relativity by drawing a porch. 6026 ingiestde. See man-picture with six dimensions and —^Vinuf ViP UpH oiTn«w>lf iin in a knot SALE. Girl’s 26" Hercules bike Innow ne tiea nimseil up in a Knot condition. Basket suitable forand we had to spend the rest of carrying child. $40. mu 4-0392.Hutchins .Continued from page 1)atk>n of Independence. “We hold thesetrutlis to be self evident, that all menare created equal, that they are endowedby their creator With certain ipiallen-able rights, that among these are life,liberty, and the pursuit of happiuese.That to secure these rights govern¬ments are instituted among men, deriv¬ing their Ju.st powers from the consentof the governed.”Now suddenly we And ourselves, with¬out experience and without much edu¬cation, facing a power whose leadersregard as false the truths Inscribed onour hearts. . . .The struggle Is one for the loyaltyand support of mankind as we movetoward the realization, on a world scale,of the truths inscribed on our hearts.This is not primarily a military struggle.Though the Russana have not neglectedmilitary preparations, their propagandasuggests that they know the struggle isnot primarily military. When they ex¬ploded their first atomic bomb, they didnot say that they were going to klUeverybody vrlth It. They said that theywere going to move mountains. Irrigatewhole continents, and make the desertto blossom as the rose. Their mostcharacteristic pose Is that of harbingersof a new day of peace and plenty.Military idea explodedThe whole conception of military pow¬er as decisive exploded with the firstRussian atomic bomb Military poweris of value when It enables you to dosomething to somebody else that hecannot do to you at aoout the sametime to about the same extent. ButWilliam Laurence of the New YorkTimes estimated long ago that If theRu&^iians could set off fifty primitiveatomic bombs In this country theycould kill forty million. Americans. Pre¬sumably If a hydrogen bomb can bemade, the Russians can make It. andcan then achieve the same effect withfive or six bombs. The day of force Isthe determining factor In world affairsended with otia atomic monopoly.Yet the truths Inscribed on our heartsare overlaid with a deep stratum ofwhat we like to cal! realism, which Islittle but stubborn conventionality.Since military power Is the ancient andtime-honored way of being strong, wemust have It, and have more of it thenanybody else, even though It will nowweaken us and delude us. and eventhough It Is Irrelevant to the kind ofstruggle In wh'icli we are engaged.In addition to the vain and Irrelevanteffort to build up overwhelming militarypower, Ve have begun an unprecedentedattempt to ensure the conformity ofour citizens. That Is, of course, whollyinappropriate to the struggle In whichwe are engaged, for the liberty inscribedon our hearts has traditionally Includedfreedom of thought, speech, and associa¬tion, and now. If ever. Is the time tashow the world the power and realityof our devotion to these principles. Wehave become In.stead the prisoners ofour own propaganda, and It Is smallconsolation that the State Department,which Is responsible for much cf thepropaganda, has become, through Sena¬tor McCarthy, a con.cplcuous victim ofIt.The process of Insisting on the con¬formity of our citizens will underminedemocracy, because, as Professor Taw-ney has said, the founqatlon of democ¬racy Is that sense of spiritual Independ¬ence which nerves the Individual tostand alone against the powers of thisworld. The consequences of dissent InAmerica today are so serious as to un¬nerve and Intimidate the Individual,whether he Is a government official, auniversity president, or a private citizen.Instead of encouraging Independentthought and criticism as the best de¬monstration of the vitality of the truthsinscribed on our hearts, we are busilyengaged in suppicoins The ef¬fort to exact a special oath from thefaculty of the University of Californiaand to attach security riders to the Na¬tional Science Foundation Bills por¬tends the grave.st dangers to the hlgh<*|.learning in America, for It can flour¬ish only If criticism can flourish If ItIs Impossible lor a man to be a pro¬fessor unless ne holds views that themajority will approve, then the Ameri¬can universities will become little morethan detention homes for the young,with technical schools attached. TheIntellectual level of a detention homeIs perhaps not of much importance. TheImportant thing Is that the Inmates bedetained. But the technological recordof totalitarian countries suggests thateven a technical school cannot longmaintain a high standard of technicalactivity If the staff Is subjected toother tests than the requirement thatIt be able to do the work expected of ItObsessed with bombsWe have been so obsessed with hypo¬thetical hydrogen bombs and the pos¬sible aberrations of minor officials thatwe have failed to notice that there Is agreat revolution going on in the world.The question is whether It shall be arevolution that rests on devotion to thetruths inscribed on our hearts and er'lswhere the American Revolution endedor one that uses the slogans of Com¬munism and ends where the RussianRevolution ended. The faith of ourfathers was that the truths Inscribedon our hearts were Inscribed on thehearts of all men; Thomas Jefferson didnot believe that he was Inventing any¬thing. The truths he spoke of wereself-evident. He explained the separa¬tion of the colonies from England Interms to which he expected the Instan¬taneous assent of mankind.I believe that the truths of the Dec¬laration of Independence are self-evi¬dent. I believe -that they still awakenan Instantaneous response in the heartsof all men. I believe that they consti¬tute the best weapon In the struggleIn which we are engaged.If they are to be an effective weapon^we have to live by them. And. if weare to live by them, v/e have to under¬stand them. Though these truths areself-evident, they are not self-explana¬tory And self-operating. Here we face‘V'I want my boy to b« normalla host of basic problems. Is equalitymerely equality of opportunity, and doesequality of opportunity mean merelythat everybody shalt have an equalchance to get the best of everybodyelse? Does liberty mean simply doingas you please without interference fromthe government and without any re¬sponsibility to the community? Ik thepursuit of happiness merely the pursuitof my happiness? If I pursue my privateadvantage am I pursuing happiness, andshall I, In pursuing my private advan¬tage, be led by an Invisible hand topromote the common good? Does hap¬piness consist In the possession of re¬frigerators, washing machines, and auto¬mobiles, with a set of the EncyclopaediaBrltannlca thrown In? Does the factthat governments are instituted to se¬cure our rights mean that I have theright to demand anything from thegovernment that I and my pressuregroup want, while at the same timeI and my pressure group Insist in thename of liberty on fre^om from thegovernment?Truths to turfacaWe need to bring, to the surface thetruths insqrlbed on our hearts and vig¬orously reinterpret and apply them; forwe know that we have no longer thesimple agrarian society of l'/76 Nowwe must find out whether competitioncan be a substitute for Justice, andwhether. If Indolence and the love ofmoney are t^ twin curses of mankindthe way t6' Overcome the first Is t"appeal to the second. We must dls-coyr some means of avoiding the ''on-cluslon of Bernanos, that a mechanicalcivilization pi-oduces merchandise anddevoura men. Is there a way In whichmodern^ man will be able to live with¬out becoming dally less and less human?What Is the relation of private profitand the needs of the community In anIndustrial age? How can we now accom¬modate the legitimate demands of so¬ciety ahd the Imprescriptible rightsof the human person? How can weIntegrate the currents of contemporaryIdeas and modern scientific knowledgeIn a more ordered vision of the worldand arrive at a synthesis that, whilepreserving variety and difference, laysthe foundation for understanding,communication, and community, withinour own country and througnout theworld? These are hard questions, andthe frivolity of American education Isrevealed by the fact that In Its desireto gratify popular whims It has not pre¬pared our people even to discuss thesequestions or to take tnem seriously.The difficulty with acquiring experi¬ence la that under modern conditionsone false move can® lead to calamity.The difficulty with education is that Ittakes time.If we can avoid blundering into war,Or talking ourselves into it, or scaringthe Russians Into it, we may have thetime. We may then be able to.generateenough Independent thought within thecountry so that we can provide theworld with a demonstration of a nationliving by the truths that are In.scrlbedon the hearts of all men. This will re¬quire the protection of our Institutionsof higher learning from those who wishto convert them from centers of Inde-?endeDt thought into nursery schools.t will require the most drastic recon¬sideration and reformation of our edu¬cational program. The way Is long andhard; but the alternative is a catas¬trophe.Members of tbe groueting dess:Your university has ttfed to help youbegin to gain the kind of education thatthe American people atrthls day requireYou have learned what tbe basic ques¬tions are, what the possible answersmay toe, and how to start the effort tofind them for yourselves. You knowthat the answnrs cannot be discovered,perhaps the questions cannot be com¬prehended, In youth. In America allmen are rulers. One of the great tasksbefore ^ou is to cdtitlnue to educateyourselves so that you may become thekind of rational rulers la t^om Platosaw the only hope foi.tlM human race.Your Alma Mater salufts you as youleave her halls. May her spirit attendyou and‘her life endch your own. Ac¬cept now her benediction and remem¬ber her with tt»t affection which shswill always feel ^ward you. -BOOKSTORE NOTICE-The Booksfore will be Closed after 1 P.M. on SATURDAYSfrom July 8, 1950, to September 30, 1950WASHThe Easy ^Modern Way9 lbsWashed andFluffed DrySpecial Summer Rates for StudentsShowing ID CardWOODLAWNLAUNDROMAT1350 ErOlst StreetHours: 8 8 DailyEasy Parking8 to 6 SaturdayTheatre-Sports TicketsAuto License ServiceNotary PublicVarsityTicket ServiceWoodworth's Book Store1311 E. 57th St. MUscum 4-1677ill.- - -CHOPPED LIVER DAILYKNISHES 10c - 15cKREPLACH 20<:KNAYDLACH Like Mother's . . . 20cWAFFLES 30cHome Cooked Summer MealsJ. B. KOSHER STYLE RESTAURANT1004 E. 55th Street'Hi 6*.^ ^ tOUT OF PRINTBOOKSPUBLISHER'SREMINDERSNEW BOOKS — USED BOOKSCLARK and CLARKBOOKSELLERS1204 E. 55th St.Ph. HYde Park 3 032110 A.M. to 9 P.M. EverydayA4'Si0jesdsy* ^ ^P“*(^- » . «3g0 Student Union offers summer.seen at Coldblatt openingThe first of-two Student Union running through August 15, Mrs.Mankind stands at the threshold of an age of “molecular medicine” which can suc-■gggfully attack cancer and heart disease, Linus Pauling told the scientific conferencelonoring the dedication ‘of the University of Chicago’s Nathan Goldblatt Memoriallospital.Pauling, internationally known professor of chemistry from the California Institute)f Technology, asserted thatmolecules — in the main by the diseases. Many, through the pow-he age of “molecular medi- ^^cuies-m , * .njic c»6v. . . « V. molecules that are called enzymes, er of his intellect will overcome;ine” will begin when we Each of these enzymes is a pro- that great scourge, caheer.”wcceed in obtaining a detailed un- tein, composed of thousands of William V. Gardner of Yale, not-lerstanding of the structure of the atoms.” ed for his work on the influencetanf mnipcules that make un the “When a detailed understanding of the glands and hormones inKrxHw oT>rf the structure of .proteins has cancer, paid tribute to basic re-,uman body and disease-causing obtalned-and I believe this searches of University of ChicagorganLsms. have been achieved before an- scientists in this field,iiont molecule* impertonf other decade has passed — this Cite* KochPauling pointed out the import- knowledge will be used in obtain- He cited biochemist Fred Kochince of the study of giant mole- ing a far more detailed and pre- for his isolation of the principleules by saying, “The work of the else structure of the nature not of the male sex hormone. Dr.luman body is done by these giant only of health but also of disease, Charles Huggir. for his work onand of the action of drugs.” the influence of sex hormones onLogical attack prostate cancer, and zoologists CarlPauling concluded, "It will be Moore and Dorothy Price, whopossible to make a straightforward established relationships betweenlogical attack on the degenerative the pituitary and sex glands.DR. KELS R. NELSONINC.OCAl AND lOMO OMTANCf NAUitNO40 YtAMS Of OMNOAMfMRVfCf ro mf sovmsiMAm foa mm mrmAnhlNB associates1138 Eg 63rd HY 3-5352OPTOMETRISTS and OPTICIANS—o—S5tH and ELLIS AVENUECHICAGO 1 5 . ILLINOISDAVID L. SUTTON, Fr..,BUttarfiDd 8-6711• Discounts to NSA purchase card holders• Eye examination and glasses• Rapid and accurate optical repairingV^OODWORTH'S1311 E. 57th St. 2 Blocks East Mandel Hall— COMPLfTl^ SUPPLIES SUMMER STUDENTS —TEXT BOOKS new & usedFor Your Convenience—POSTAL STATION RENTAL UBRARYTHEATRE ‘HCKET SERVICE•Open Evenings — Monday, Wednesday, FridayOpen Saturday-—All DayBOOK STORE1311 E. 57th St. —LIXCOLIV MERCURYIN HYDE PARKSpecializing In Ford ProductsWE SERVICE AlYD REPAIRALL MAKERS OF AUTOS. SIMONIZERODV AlYD EEIYDER WORKFactory Trained mechanicsLAKE PARK MOTORS.' 5601 HARPER AVE.S. TAUBER, President E. KAPLAN, TreasurerStV ' ^P3isquare dances will be held in theIda Noyes Gymnasium on Satur¬day, July 8, 8 p.m.Beginners are welcome and in¬vited to try their hands or feet atthe dance. There will be specialinstruction for their benefit byqualified callers and old time ad¬vocates uof the true American wayof the dance.Smith will instruct all those menand women who are somewhatfamiliar with the game and wishto improve.Instruction is from 7 to 8 p.m.and supervised play will followtill 9.All the latest and oldest swingsand twirls will be attempted.For those beginners who areafraid to begin without any pre¬vious experience, lessons will beheld on Thursday, June 29, andThursdays thereafter.Register at the main desk inIda Noyes Hall not later than July10th because the class is limitedto 60. There will be a nominal fee.SU to sponsorstudent tourneysIda open houseshows facilitiesThis Wednesday’s open housewill introduce the facilities of IdaNoyes Hall to summer quarter stu¬dents. All the recreational lacili-ties of the hall will be open from7 until 10 p.m.There will be skating in thegymnasium, skates being provided;swimming in the swirnming pool,suits being provided; bowling atthe bowling alleys, balls beingprovided, and the table tennisrooms will also be available. Forthose adverse to strenuous activ¬ity, bridge playing, chess andcheckers will be available.During the remainder of thesummer these recreational facili¬ties will be open at .specified hoursduring the week. Ida Noyes Hallhas a schedule of activities whichlists such open hours.Student Union will sponsor atable tennis tournament on Mon¬day, July 3, at 7 p.m., in the IdaNeyes hall game room. Preregis¬tration will be held all this week atthe Ida Noyes check room on thefirst floor of the building. Thoseinterested in competing shouldregister by noon on July 3,The table tennis tournament isthe first of a series of Mondaynight tournaments sponsored byStudent Union. Others scheduledare a bowling tournament on July17 and a bridge tournament onJuly 24.During the second term of the*siunmer quarter the followingtournaments are scheduled. Aug¬ust 7, table tennis; August 14,bowling; August 21, biidge. Watchthe MAROON and the bulletinboards for notices of registration.Turkey Run—here we comeBridge addictsoffered trainingJosephine Walters Smith, one ofEly Culbertson’s pets of the bridgetable will instruct all potential“fourths for bridge” in the IdaNoyes library in a series of sixlessons this summer.Starting Tuesday, July 11, andStudent Union’s. outing depart¬ment will lead a campus migrationto Turkey Run, Indiana Saturday.The lovers of nature who tag alongwill stay for the weekend. FuKherinformation on the camping tripmay be had at the SU office, IdaNoyes.Shop at the Sign of the “C'International House planseight trips around ChicagoEight trips to points of interest around Chicago havebeen planned by International House for foreign studentsand for those who will be in Chicago for only the summerquarter. A picnic supper and concert at Ravinia will beginthe series on Tuesday, July 11. William Kapell, pianist,will be the soloist.On Sunday, July 16, agroup will visit the ChicagoLake Front Fair composed ofexhibits depicting the agriculture,industry, science and commerce ofAmerica. Baseball at WrigleyField is next on the agenda onJuly 23.A west side tour of slum hous¬ing will take place on July dur¬ing which Skid Row, Maxwell st.and the Jane Addams Housingproject will be seen. On July 8,the Carnegie-Illinois Steel Plantwill be toured, August 10 has beenscheduled fo” another visit toRavinia, August 18 carries a tripto Northwestern University andthe series will be climaxed witha trip to Brookfield Zoo on Au¬gust 27.Reservations may be made with*Mrs. McNeer at InternationalHouse and should be turned in asmuch as possible before the dateof the trip.ESCORTED TOUR SCHEDULESummer QuarterAir Conditioned Buses Used On All ToursChinatown — 4-hour lecture tour includingChinese dinner^. Wed., June 28th, 6:30 p.m.Price $2.98Chicago at Nite—4-hour nite life observationtour, including refreshment stops. Fri., June30th, 7:00 p.m. Price $2.50Chicago by Day—4-hour general tour coverPngmajor points of interest. (Picnic lunch Includ¬ed). Sot., July 1st, 10:00 Q.m.’ Price $2.50Special Ravinia Concert Tours—Every Saturdayevening. Price includes $1 25 Gen. Admission.Depart 6:45 p.m. ^ Price $.2.98All Tours Depart from Mandel Hall (57th and University)at Times SpecifiedVARSITY TICKET SERVICEWOODWORTH'S BOOK STORE1311 E. 57th Street * MUseum 4-1677Chicago 37, Illinoisot'O’Nfc 4THE CHICAGO MAROONTlMtAiy «JiMM 27; 195QCARE polls helpers Reporter aids restive studentswith tips on Chicago’s lifeOf its 26 per cent share of the money raised by Campus By HIU.EL black .Chest during the last academic year more democratic by Early Chicago settlers must have had visions of the gigantic city of lights and litter,polling more than 200 students (CARE personnel, House where the sidewalks feei the tootsies of five million people daily. In Chicago you canChest representatives and Chest workers) as to exactly rub lapels with big shots like Colonel McCormick and Bushman.where the packages shou’d go. Chicago brags about itself even with the word “shecagou,” tlie original Indian han-Jerry Green- ■ ———— cock, meaning “strong.’' But all this chest puffing has blown into the windy city aikter to all t rtfSS'tiirto ?»«»<»» oT'eatoriesrgayely "jointe, and hot housra of culturethose involved in raUing the a .f vo.. have a-felt need” -funds and accompanied it with a though the CARE committee has AgG Of anXIGTyCARE booklet describing the t5T)es presented a proposal in favor of ■ J £ ■of packages available and the gome cooperation.” OGSCriDCCl fOTcountries to which they can beSo if you have a “felt need’to hit the hot spots andsent.One paragraph of Greenwald’sletter foretells a possible changein charity collection policy at theUniversity: “CARE's perecentageof Chest proceeds will amount toles.s than $2,000, as opposed to the$7,000 raised as an independentgroup during the 1948-49 schoolcoddles the first-run movie houses,haven’t handed in your tui- supplemented by foreign films, attion yet. here are some places to World Playhouse, the Surf, thego Oinema, the New Astor, with theIn the realm of mustard and Hyd® Park serving the same funo-mignon there is the Tropical Hut hon on the South Side.Althouffh the modern and Gordon’s, Both are between ^f your ears are twitching forV. • 1 • f Kimbark and Kenwood on 57th Kood music, he caves of cultureworlds ability to produce competing in a little game are. Orchestra Hall. Civic Operashould make this the hap- called high prices. On the North House, Grant Park, Ravinia Park,piest period of mankind S side, near Rush st., you can make f^® H^ne Note, .Tazz Limited, Raghistory, it is an age of anxi- believe that going to school this Silhouette, and the BeeChancellor Hutchins will hold |ty. umest and misery the summer was ^ bad nightmare and Hme^is annual reception for summer Rev. Dr. Joseph Haroutun- lose your^^t In pmuers of mHutchins put 9rouPon display*at receptionyear. All other campus charitieshave suffered in the same pro- quarter students in Ida Noyes gar- jf”’Pizzeria’and Ricardo’s”' ^o^^h with International Houseden June 30. From 8:30 to 9:30 ogy at McCormick Theological Fizzena ana Kicardos. conduct trio*Mr. Hutchins will shake Seminary, told r Convocation con- When you get a big thirst on, tripsthe pink elephant specialists re-Cummings awardp.m.i. j ^ fsaci areeation recently the pink eiepnant specialists re- through the West Side.T T/^ hands with all those who feel . , i. . side at the University Tavern at yes, if you haven t noticedUC poetry honor strong enough to approach. A special section in the chapel ^de at e u ers ty a e n. c ^ir J Aeciefiwrv fHn f-HonPoiinr in fhp rpsprvprf nt. tiiP mnrniner .«>rv- and University, and J m Michigan, excellentfor swimming and mu’d baths.made thecrack, that New York is looking planners deereeKt® forward. Pittsbureh is lookine * UCgTCCSAssisting the Chancellor in the was reserved at the morning serv • f *i,E. E. Cummings, New York poet receiving line will be Mr. and Mrs. ices for June graduates of the uni- ^ lurtner east,and author of 19 books, ha.s been Alonzo Grace, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- versity and the college. ^ corner wic onceawarded the 1950 Harriet Monroe uam S. Gray, and Mr. and Mrs. ‘‘Western society has come wj forward Piit<!hiirah innirinirPoetry award at the University of Thorkild Jacobson. this day of peril because we have Swa^rd and ^ChfcaJ S nfChicago. Ernest Cadman Colwell. in keeping with the dignity of confused wisdom with science. The teiSr^when tLpresident, announced recently. this event there will be no demon- wise man today is one who has HihS and fSaiu rhirLn ,.^1The $500 prize was endowed by stration of loyalty other than the the knowledge and skill to possess 1 boot hand mp dnwn^the late Mis- Monroe, editor of weird dances of our civilization the goods in our world. But it is from eastern ^eMer^of^ulturr^Peetry, a Magazine of Verse. Un- which will follow from 9:30 to precisely such wisdom that per- J viC wanf^ nlav Wsieder the terms of her will, the re- 12:30 p.m. Music for the affair will vades the folly of our age orS ^ ^ footsie .. r . r •v««co ..lie iviijf ui yjul ttge. and watch the current season s Dallas, Texas; Janet Louise Lipp-‘‘The e.ssence of wisdom is faith, efforts you can visit the following man. West End. New Jersey; Wil-Prom faith proceeds hope; by hope legitimate theaters, Harris, Sel- liam McCormick Lundberg, 804 E.we number our days and apply wyn, Blackstone, Great Northern, 59th st., and Tullius L. Wingo, Jr,our hearts to wisdom. By wisdom Studebaker, and Erlanger. Tick- E. Paso. Texas. '*»we have peace. Let us cease to say ets may be purchased through‘peace, peace,* where there is no Woodworth’s Bookstore.P®®®®-” The area around Randolph st.precisely such wisdom that per12:30 p.m. Music for the affair will vades the folly of our age,cipient is chosen by a committee be provided by Eddie James andof three poets, with preference go- his relatives. Dates are not neces-ing to writers of progressive ten- sary.denoies. —H. B.The University’s planning de¬partment awarded its first masterof arts degrees in planning in thedivision of social sciences at thi.smonth’s graduation ceremonies.They went to: Stephen H. Axilrod,Teaching excellence prizesgiven Bradbury, CeithamI, MeyerThr^e one thousand dollar prizes, awarded annually at VV OTlCi COObCTClttOYt SLTOXi^t)the University of Chicago for excellence in undergraduate * o Jrteaching, were awarded to three faculty members in the i - • ♦Chancellor Robert M. Hutchins SCCKS CCtTIlpUS YCCOgtlltlOTlCollge of the university,announced.The 1950 recipients of the prizes, the only such awardsin the nation, were presented to: William Chapman Brad¬bury, Jr., assistant professor of the 1QOO Ww Q Vnrlr ali.mnne tn i **“social sciencesV Joseph James interest teachers in training not intP^naHnnal^TTn^nn Second World Congress of theInternational Union of Students in Prague next August,Fund-raising activities will be carried on this summeron campus by an ad hoc body called the Committee forInternational Student Cooperation in an effort to sendtrainingCeithamI, assistant professor of only scholars and research workbiochemistry; and William H. L. gj-g put also young men and wom-Meyer, Jr., assistant professor of en for intelligent participation andmathematics, leadership in business, civic andThe prizes were inaugurated in professional life.The group must first secure recognition by the adminis¬tration which it is now in ;the process of doing accord- sending invitations toTuesday, June 27—The Christian Science Oi5ani*atlonwill hold its regular Tuesday eveningmeeting at 7:30 p.m. in Hilton Chapel.raise anything from $500 to $2,000.Previously the UC Student Gov¬ernment had taken several actionsin connection with the lUS con-sessions at the Chicago Theological The Student Assembly votedSeminary. to recommend to the NationalWednesdoy, July 5 students Association national staffThe Conference of The Teachers of (which has the final word on theWednesdoy, June 28— Jun\or^con^es°wi1i°begi^n fts^*^^ions n^aher) that three UCers be sentinter - Varsity Christian Fellowship with the topic "Have the Social Studies by NSA as obseiver-reporters tO£!•« lU. plague m.eung. They are BUIfs the time ^ ’ Beifieid Hall. - Birenbaum, Patricia Groom andwm“be*mLe^^® L^?he flrs^^of^'tho 'The social dance’chib will hold try- ^^^nk ^gan. It also approved ascomimtt^ AgalSt MlllUrlaatton’a fllt^ ouU in fox '"theatre'"‘An^on^ f F®instein. whO® Who can''and'‘?ik^°"to d‘^nTu iaVitZ] is to be m Prague studying.no partner is necessary.K. The Committee Against MUitarizationLower Depths ^11 be pre^nt^ by pre^^gnts Shakespeare’s "As You Like It"the United Wt^.d Pederalist.s at 7 ..5 and version at 6, 8 and 9:45 p.m.9:15 In Soc. 122. Admission is 50 cents, jp Judd 126. Admission is 50 cents.Fndoy, Jun© 30 “The congress” will be the topic ofTorment, fiist prize film at the 1946 the second lecture in the "AmericanInterntional Film Festiyal will be shown Ocvernment at Midcentury” series atby the Politics Club in Social Science 3:00 in Social Science 122.LVeni*’ Monday, July .10—• • • The Magic Horse, the first RussianChancellor Hutchins will hold his on- full length color cartoon, will be shownnual reception for summer quarter stu- m International House. Admission isdents in Ida Noyes Garden from B:30 46 cents.to 9:30 p.m. A dance wlU follovjf with liilw 1 ^Eddie James band on the stand. VV ©anesacy, JUiy IAm . j 111 The Committee Against Militarization^aiUrday, July l presents the film "Don Quixote” by Cer-Student Union Outing Depaitment vantes. starring Chaliapin; in Judd 126will sponsor a tour to Turkey Run State ot 6, 8 and 9:45 p.m. Fifty cents is thePark. Further Information can be got- charge,ten from the Student Union office InIda Noyes Hall.ing to the MARCX)N’s inform- the world gathering, bypa&sedant, Dan Pox. The fund goal is to NSA, which had disaffiliated fromit in 1948, In favor of the CISC.CISC is not, however, officiallyaffiliated with lUS.Bea He«lit*s ^THE SPECTRE OF THEROSEWed., June 286, 8 and 9:45 P.M.JUDD 12660<Box Office Opensat 5:00 P.M.National Association for the Advance¬ment of Colored People In Soc 122 at3:30. 7:15 and 9:15. The fee is 50 cents.Les Miserable* will be offered by theMonday,, July 3—science, will deliver the first lecture Inthe ‘ American Government at Mid Cen¬tury” series at 3:00 In Social Science122. He will speak on "Separation ofPowers.”The University of Chicago work.shopin Group Dynamics will begin Its dallyMidway Sho© R©pairInvisible HalfShoes Dyed and Refini«hed24-Hour Servic©1017 E. 61t»Phone HYde Pork 3-4286LONG DISTANCE MOVINGBOOKS FOR YOUR PLEASURE AND STUDYFOR YOUR REFERENCE LIBRARYTHE AMERICAN LANGUAGE.. $6.00Supplem©nt I $6.00Suppl©m©nt II $7.50by H. L. MENCKENFUNDAMENTALS OF GOOD WRITING. .$4.75by ROBERT WARRENA hondbook on how to think straight about writing.A RHETORIC OF MOTIVES $5.00l>y KENNETH lURKEA new approach to rhetoric.MODERN AMERICAN POETRY $6.00LOUIS UNTERMEYER, 14.This revision contains many new poets.AMERICAN JEWISH YEARBOOK. FOR T950 $3.95A record of events and trends in American ond world Jewish fife.THEREBY HANGS A TALE $3.50by CHARLES E. FUNKStories of curious word origins. 'SLANG TODAY AND YESTERDAY $5.00by EKIC PARTRIDGEREADING FOR PLEASURESee our selection of books and book packages priced atonly'$1.00. Many fine fiction and non-fiction titles.PERMA BOOKS 3 for $1.00LIVING LIBRARY TITLES $1.00 eachHOLIDAY LIBRARY TITLES $^.00 eachGREAT MUSICIANS SERIES $1.00 eachi\ete studentg are especially invited to gee our windowfot* more complete information about our very largeselection of reference works.UNIVERSITY OF BOOKSTORE5802 Ellis A^nue* . nagii.i,;—,.fofnouliadwesr6wS(Par!<bluepustionlorntheIntelintoTItreafab,rec:pro'iacquNeedW-hiplantohan!lhi.s’1'sporamoconethiinatneeiwarparientTtheYWYWfun50YMPJoinPutthoitheifor2 PfineBlectheBellastTW.BeanofverthiiboaveiforHigChiRaitruviceTurdireWaliefIMPERFECT IN