oBSplit WeekEffectiveIn SpringIInnovation AppliesOnly To DivisionsThe split-week will become reality with the Spring Quarter, Dean ofStudents Aaron J. Brumbaugh announced yesterday. The innovation willnot be introduced into the College, however, until next year. As re-registra¬tion is necessary to put the plan into action and the College works on ayearly registration basis, introduction of the plan in the middle of the yearwould cause unwarranted upheaval, Brumbaugh said. The Divisions, how¬ever, operate with quarterly registration, and so are easily adaptable.Development of the new schedule will be along the lines of the presentwork plan with Marshall Field & Co. Under this plan, students work atField’s on Saturdays, Monday, and other afternoons. An elaboration of thismight enable two students to hold down one full time job on alternatingshifts.Robert C. Woellner, Executive Secretary of the Board of VocationalGuidance and Placements, yesterday told a Maroon reporter that the Boardis now working to get various offices and plants lined up to cooperate onthis basis. He indicated that Marshall Field’s and other business officesgenerally, will find the new arrangement more satisfactory, as it providesfor full-time positions. He anticipated a consequent wider demand.Requirements for the two year B.A., announced last week along withthe split-week, are being decided upon, and will probably be announcedby the end of the quarter, Brumbaugh said. Students now in the Collegewill become eligible for the new degree only on completion of these re¬quirements, it was said. - - . -SelectBlackfriarChorusFrom 50 ThrowbacksThomaS’KruegerDebateMaynard KruegerBy PHILIP RIEFFThe all-consuming and highly in-flaniniable question that has been de¬bated by everyone from Frank Hagueto California will finally get an airingfrom its two most interested authori¬ties, when Norman Thomas and May¬nard Krueger, leaders of the Ameri¬can Socialists Party, discuss “WillThe War Bring Socialism?’’ before apublic audience, today, in MandelHall, at 4.Four Time CandidateSponsored by the University of Chi¬cago’s Socialist Club, Thomas, fourtimes candidate for the Presidencyon the Socialist ticket, and Krueger,his running mate in the national elec¬tion of 1940, will argue a case whichthe U.S. public hears discussed by al¬most everyone but the Socialist headsthemselves; for the Party lacks themeans for constant mass communi¬cation.Norman Thomas is a native prod¬uct, born in Marion, Ohio. As a youthhe worked, as a newsboy, on W’arrenG. Harding’s Marion paper. Followingthe family bent for the clerical voca¬tion, Thomas, like his father, becamea minister of the Presbyterian church.Joined Party in 1927But his life as a religious preacherended with his stand in oppositionto America’s entry into World War I,and in 1927 he joined the SocialistParty; then led by Hoosierite EugeneDebs. He soon became one of thefounders of the organization that laterbecame the American Civil LibertiesUnion.A Princeton man, Thomas first ranfor the Presidency in 1928.Maynard Krueger, born on a farmin Missouri, worked his way throughthe University of Missouri and vari¬ous European schools, before he be¬came an Associate Professor of Eco¬nomics on the Quadrangles. His onlytwo attempts to move into electiveoffice were an early campaign for thealdermanship of the Fifth Ward ofChicago, and his vice-presidential as¬piration two years ago.PromoteBaum, SachsRichard Himmel, Maroon Board ofControl Chairman, announced yester¬day that Minna Sachs and WernerBaum have been promoted to posi¬tions of Editorial Associates on thegeneral news staff.The sports editorship of the Ma¬roon, formerly held by Baum, will betaken over by Craig Leman, sportseditor of the now non-existant Capand Gown.The change will go into effect nextWeek.VeteranCops RoleIn ^Foxes”Edith Magerstadt“M a g g i e” Magerstadttakes a lead character partin the current Dramatic As¬sociation production of Lil¬lian H ell m an* s hairstraightener, “The LittleFoxes** This is the firstproduction of the quarter,and goes on in the middle ofFebruary.Repeat PhysicalFitness TestFor StudentsDue to popular request the PhysicalFitness Test will be repeated tomor¬row and Sunday, and Wednesday andThursday of next week. According toAthletic Director Metcalf, many peo¬ple have come in at odd hours andasked for the test during the pastweek.The test is to be given during con¬ditioning class hours as follows:Sunday 10Saturday 11Wednesday 12:10 and 2:40Thursday^ 7:30Students are asked to report in theFieldhouse wearing street clothes.Men who took the test in the pastmay obtain their scores either at theconditioning classes, at the physicaleducation office, or at the Fieldhouseafter the military periods on January30, and February 4 or 6.**Mr. Metcalfe, who has just returnedfrom a special naval assignment, in¬dicated disappointment over the smallnumber of people who took the ex¬amination. The Athletic Director alsocited the fact that the scores obtainedare insignificant due to this smallnumber.Approximately 175 men have reg¬istered in the conditioning classes.The evening classes have not startedas yet.For these conditioning classes noaldvance registration is necessary,and men may attend all or any ses¬sions.Betty Jane Tullis was elected tem¬porary Chairman of Keystone uponthe resignation of Clarissa Rahill,who will not be on the quadranglesnext quarter. The first action ofthe new Chairman was to call aBoard meeting for this afternoonand to announce a meeting to beheld next Tuesday in Ida Noyes at3:30.Clear UpWashPromAttackAl DonahueBack to the old smeltpot! Notoriousfor its first five years of existence asa bitter and vitriolic critic of otherstudent organizations. Pulse after asporadic start toward meeting themhalfway has gone back to its- oldways.Latest victim of the journalisticproblem-child’s castigation is DinkMacLellan’s Student Social Commit¬tee. Just what brought on the tiradeis not clear; but Pulse issued “direpredictions’’ for the fate of this year’sWashington Prom.Bob Bean expects perhaps five-hun¬dred couples. Not more than three-hundred of these will dance at onetime, but Pulse irritably complainedof “postage stamp dancing of the As¬taire caliber.” Dimensions of theGrand Ballroom, erroneously stated byPulse, are actually 76-153 feet; allow¬ing 11,000 square feet of dancingroom, or nearly' 40 per couple. Quitea postage stamp. Pulse.Three separate bar-rooms and thewhole Mezzanine will give both thefollowers of Bacchus and teetotalersplenty of elbow room for rest betweendances. Al Donahue’s fifteen pieceorchestra will provide music for theevening. A top-flighter in the East,the handsome Irish band-leader is un¬familiar to many Chicagoans. Insid¬ers hint that he will supply some ofthe best swing heard around the cam¬pus in years.The Prom Committee meets todayto start the publicity campaign. Post¬ers go up by noon; members of theProm and Social Committees and atable in Mandel Corridor will sell bidsat three dollars each.With most of the campus behind itand the most beautiful ball-room inthe University vicinity, MacLellan,Bean, and Committee expect the bestturn-out in years. Remember, theProm is a benefit. Your reporterstakes his professional reputation.Go out on a limb, and bet on its suc¬cess.Bob CharlesPlays For “C”The Reynolds Club Council presentsBob Charles and his orchestra in thesecond Winter “C” dance, tonightfrom 9:30 to 1:00. A new feature, theRumpus Room, has been added, inwhich the major facilities of the Rey¬nolds Club will be open (includingbarber shop?).The theme of the occasion is thedisplay of reproductions of Club andfraternity pins. These masterpieceswere painted by the members of eachsociety on campus.Season tickets for the three dancesin the series can still be purchasedfor $1.00. The proceeds will be donat¬ed to the Red Cross.Bob Charles has also been bookedfor the third dance in the series.Twenty men and six understudieswere selected from over fifty aspiringmales who strutted forth in MandelHall last Wednesday in an attempt toTrend Go AfterOther CampusLiteratureIn keeping with the idea that Trendis an intercollegiate publication, theFebruary 4 issue of the new magazinewill feature writers from six Ameri¬can universities. Besides the articlesby campus authors, student storiesfrom Harvard, NYU, Wisconsin, Dart¬mouth and the Art Institute of Chi¬cago are included in the magazine.Heading the features will be anevaluation of Chicago as a potentialart center written by Constructivist,Charles Biederman. American jazzand jazzmen as viewed by U. G. Lee,one of Trend’s editors, is the subjectfor another article in the forthcomingissue.Another editor, John W. Barnes, isthe author of one three short stories,“But the Bullets are Real”. BowderBroadwater of the Harvard Advocatestaff who wrote “Several Blots on theFamily Escutcheon” and Edward Ras¬mussen who authored “Don’che Wan’naDig, Chillun?” Are the other shortstory writers. Verse by Helen Wiesel-berg and Katinka Loeser of the Uni-1 versity are included in the poetrysection as well as poems by ArthurBlair and Creighton Gilbert of NYU.Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”is illustrated by Joan Waddell, ArtInstitute student. The illustrationsare introduced by a letter from Mannto the original illustrator of the bookwritten more than twenty years ago.( Continued on page three)make the grade and enter the Mirror-Blackfriars show. These twenty-sixadditions to the theatrical world willnot be requested to report for re¬hearsal next Monday as will theirsister chorines who were chosen lastweek.All girls who are in the chorus ofthe musical show must appear Mon¬day afternoon at 3 o’clock in MandelHall, prepared to practice. This is thefirst of many coming rehearsals forthese girls who have been put intothree different groups; show girls,mediums, and ponies. It has not yetbeen decided whether the girls andmen will combine forces and put onseveral dances together or do theirnumbers unaided by members of theopposite sex.( Continued on page three)Chapel SpeaksSpiels YouthEach year, at least one Negrospeaker is invited to the pulpit of theUniversity Chapel by the Board ofSocial Service and Religion. DeanHoward Thurman of Howard Univer¬sity, Washington D.C., who speaksthis Sunday in the 11 o’clock ChapelService, has been here three times,more often than any other leader inthis series.Dean Thurman, who is Dean of theUniversity Chapel at Howard, hascome back at the suggestion of stu¬dents who have heard him at studentsummer conferences. At these confer¬ences all over the world, he has provedone of the mose popular and influen¬tial speakers. Five years ago, he andMrs. Thurman went to Indiia to rep¬resent the American student move¬ment among the colleges and univer¬sities of India. Dean Thurman’s sub¬ject will be “The Quest of Fulfill¬ment”.oBSplit WeekEffectiveIn SpringIInnovation AppliesOnly To DivisionsThe split-week will become reality with the Spring Quarter, Dean ofStudents Aaron J. Brumbaugh announced yesterday. The innovation willnot be introduced into the College, however, until next year. As re-registra¬tion is necessary to put the plan into action and the College works on ayearly registration basis, introduction of the plan in the middle of the yearwould cause unwarranted upheaval, Brumbaugh said. The Divisions, how¬ever, operate with quarterly registration, and so are easily adaptable.Development of the new schedule will be along the lines of the presentwork plan with Marshall Field & Co. Under this plan, students work atField’s on Saturdays, Monday, and other afternoons. An elaboration of thismight enable two students to hold down one full time job on alternatingshifts.Robert C. Woellner, Executive Secretary of the Board of VocationalGuidance and Placements, yesterday told a Maroon reporter that the Boardis now working to get various offices and plants lined up to cooperate onthis basis. He indicated that Marshall Field’s and other business officesgenerally, will find the new arrangement more satisfactory, as it providesfor full-time positions. He anticipated a consequent wider demand.Requirements for the two year B.A., announced last week along withthe split-week, are being decided upon, and will probably be announcedby the end of the quarter, Brumbaugh said. Students now in the Collegewill become eligible for the new degree only on completion of these re¬quirements, it was said. - - . -SelectBlackfriarChorusFrom 50 ThrowbacksThomaS’KruegerDebateMaynard KruegerBy PHILIP RIEFFThe all-consuming and highly in-flaniniable question that has been de¬bated by everyone from Frank Hagueto California will finally get an airingfrom its two most interested authori¬ties, when Norman Thomas and May¬nard Krueger, leaders of the Ameri¬can Socialists Party, discuss “WillThe War Bring Socialism?’’ before apublic audience, today, in MandelHall, at 4.Four Time CandidateSponsored by the University of Chi¬cago’s Socialist Club, Thomas, fourtimes candidate for the Presidencyon the Socialist ticket, and Krueger,his running mate in the national elec¬tion of 1940, will argue a case whichthe U.S. public hears discussed by al¬most everyone but the Socialist headsthemselves; for the Party lacks themeans for constant mass communi¬cation.Norman Thomas is a native prod¬uct, born in Marion, Ohio. As a youthhe worked, as a newsboy, on W’arrenG. Harding’s Marion paper. Followingthe family bent for the clerical voca¬tion, Thomas, like his father, becamea minister of the Presbyterian church.Joined Party in 1927But his life as a religious preacherended with his stand in oppositionto America’s entry into World War I,and in 1927 he joined the SocialistParty; then led by Hoosierite EugeneDebs. He soon became one of thefounders of the organization that laterbecame the American Civil LibertiesUnion.A Princeton man, Thomas first ranfor the Presidency in 1928.Maynard Krueger, born on a farmin Missouri, worked his way throughthe University of Missouri and vari¬ous European schools, before he be¬came an Associate Professor of Eco¬nomics on the Quadrangles. His onlytwo attempts to move into electiveoffice were an early campaign for thealdermanship of the Fifth Ward ofChicago, and his vice-presidential as¬piration two years ago.PromoteBaum, SachsRichard Himmel, Maroon Board ofControl Chairman, announced yester¬day that Minna Sachs and WernerBaum have been promoted to posi¬tions of Editorial Associates on thegeneral news staff.The sports editorship of the Ma¬roon, formerly held by Baum, will betaken over by Craig Leman, sportseditor of the now non-existant Capand Gown.The change will go into effect nextWeek.VeteranCops RoleIn ^Foxes”Edith Magerstadt“M a g g i e” Magerstadttakes a lead character partin the current Dramatic As¬sociation production of Lil¬lian H ell m an* s hairstraightener, “The LittleFoxes** This is the firstproduction of the quarter,and goes on in the middle ofFebruary.Repeat PhysicalFitness TestFor StudentsDue to popular request the PhysicalFitness Test will be repeated tomor¬row and Sunday, and Wednesday andThursday of next week. According toAthletic Director Metcalf, many peo¬ple have come in at odd hours andasked for the test during the pastweek.The test is to be given during con¬ditioning class hours as follows:Sunday 10Saturday 11Wednesday 12:10 and 2:40Thursday^ 7:30Students are asked to report in theFieldhouse wearing street clothes.Men who took the test in the pastmay obtain their scores either at theconditioning classes, at the physicaleducation office, or at the Fieldhouseafter the military periods on January30, and February 4 or 6.**Mr. Metcalfe, who has just returnedfrom a special naval assignment, in¬dicated disappointment over the smallnumber of people who took the ex¬amination. The Athletic Director alsocited the fact that the scores obtainedare insignificant due to this smallnumber.Approximately 175 men have reg¬istered in the conditioning classes.The evening classes have not startedas yet.For these conditioning classes noaldvance registration is necessary,and men may attend all or any ses¬sions.Betty Jane Tullis was elected tem¬porary Chairman of Keystone uponthe resignation of Clarissa Rahill,who will not be on the quadranglesnext quarter. The first action ofthe new Chairman was to call aBoard meeting for this afternoonand to announce a meeting to beheld next Tuesday in Ida Noyes at3:30.Clear UpWashPromAttackAl DonahueBack to the old smeltpot! Notoriousfor its first five years of existence asa bitter and vitriolic critic of otherstudent organizations. Pulse after asporadic start toward meeting themhalfway has gone back to its- oldways.Latest victim of the journalisticproblem-child’s castigation is DinkMacLellan’s Student Social Commit¬tee. Just what brought on the tiradeis not clear; but Pulse issued “direpredictions’’ for the fate of this year’sWashington Prom.Bob Bean expects perhaps five-hun¬dred couples. Not more than three-hundred of these will dance at onetime, but Pulse irritably complainedof “postage stamp dancing of the As¬taire caliber.” Dimensions of theGrand Ballroom, erroneously stated byPulse, are actually 76-153 feet; allow¬ing 11,000 square feet of dancingroom, or nearly' 40 per couple. Quitea postage stamp. Pulse.Three separate bar-rooms and thewhole Mezzanine will give both thefollowers of Bacchus and teetotalersplenty of elbow room for rest betweendances. Al Donahue’s fifteen pieceorchestra will provide music for theevening. A top-flighter in the East,the handsome Irish band-leader is un¬familiar to many Chicagoans. Insid¬ers hint that he will supply some ofthe best swing heard around the cam¬pus in years.The Prom Committee meets todayto start the publicity campaign. Post¬ers go up by noon; members of theProm and Social Committees and atable in Mandel Corridor will sell bidsat three dollars each.With most of the campus behind itand the most beautiful ball-room inthe University vicinity, MacLellan,Bean, and Committee expect the bestturn-out in years. Remember, theProm is a benefit. Your reporterstakes his professional reputation.Go out on a limb, and bet on its suc¬cess.Bob CharlesPlays For “C”The Reynolds Club Council presentsBob Charles and his orchestra in thesecond Winter “C” dance, tonightfrom 9:30 to 1:00. A new feature, theRumpus Room, has been added, inwhich the major facilities of the Rey¬nolds Club will be open (includingbarber shop?).The theme of the occasion is thedisplay of reproductions of Club andfraternity pins. These masterpieceswere painted by the members of eachsociety on campus.Season tickets for the three dancesin the series can still be purchasedfor $1.00. The proceeds will be donat¬ed to the Red Cross.Bob Charles has also been bookedfor the third dance in the series.Twenty men and six understudieswere selected from over fifty aspiringmales who strutted forth in MandelHall last Wednesday in an attempt toTrend Go AfterOther CampusLiteratureIn keeping with the idea that Trendis an intercollegiate publication, theFebruary 4 issue of the new magazinewill feature writers from six Ameri¬can universities. Besides the articlesby campus authors, student storiesfrom Harvard, NYU, Wisconsin, Dart¬mouth and the Art Institute of Chi¬cago are included in the magazine.Heading the features will be anevaluation of Chicago as a potentialart center written by Constructivist,Charles Biederman. American jazzand jazzmen as viewed by U. G. Lee,one of Trend’s editors, is the subjectfor another article in the forthcomingissue.Another editor, John W. Barnes, isthe author of one three short stories,“But the Bullets are Real”. BowderBroadwater of the Harvard Advocatestaff who wrote “Several Blots on theFamily Escutcheon” and Edward Ras¬mussen who authored “Don’che Wan’naDig, Chillun?” Are the other shortstory writers. Verse by Helen Wiesel-berg and Katinka Loeser of the Uni-1 versity are included in the poetrysection as well as poems by ArthurBlair and Creighton Gilbert of NYU.Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”is illustrated by Joan Waddell, ArtInstitute student. The illustrationsare introduced by a letter from Mannto the original illustrator of the bookwritten more than twenty years ago.( Continued on page three)make the grade and enter the Mirror-Blackfriars show. These twenty-sixadditions to the theatrical world willnot be requested to report for re¬hearsal next Monday as will theirsister chorines who were chosen lastweek.All girls who are in the chorus ofthe musical show must appear Mon¬day afternoon at 3 o’clock in MandelHall, prepared to practice. This is thefirst of many coming rehearsals forthese girls who have been put intothree different groups; show girls,mediums, and ponies. It has not yetbeen decided whether the girls andmen will combine forces and put onseveral dances together or do theirnumbers unaided by members of theopposite sex.( Continued on page three)Chapel SpeaksSpiels YouthEach year, at least one Negrospeaker is invited to the pulpit of theUniversity Chapel by the Board ofSocial Service and Religion. DeanHoward Thurman of Howard Univer¬sity, Washington D.C., who speaksthis Sunday in the 11 o’clock ChapelService, has been here three times,more often than any other leader inthis series.Dean Thurman, who is Dean of theUniversity Chapel at Howard, hascome back at the suggestion of stu¬dents who have heard him at studentsummer conferences. At these confer¬ences all over the world, he has provedone of the mose popular and influen¬tial speakers. Five years ago, he andMrs. Thurman went to Indiia to rep¬resent the American student move¬ment among the colleges and univer¬sities of India. Dean Thurman’s sub¬ject will be “The Quest of Fulfill¬ment”.Page TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 30. 1942TravelingBazaarBy SHIRLEY SMITHScratch the Surface in Pulse is nomore than a feeble attempt at mar¬ring finishes. As one writer of smutcolumns to another, even in this realmof journalism, if it can so be called,there are a few ethical traditionswithin which one should try and stay.The grossest example of oversteppingthese bonds is when writers have toresort to poking fun at the physicalinadequacies of their contemporaries.This is perhaps the lowest form ofseditious activity, and it would be¬hoove such people to pause and re-fiect, perhaps at their own reflections,before continuing such practices.Someday there might come someonewith an equally libellous and bigotedtongnie to reverse the flight of suchill-timed barbs. Before passing on tomore enjoyable subjects, it might beadded, that such columns should tryto maintain some semblance of truthin them...The most recent . . ... .“call to the front" has come fromWashington, D.C. A dire need for re¬porters has started the mass exodus.Wild tales have circulated for monthsconcerning the impossibility of secur¬ing housing facilities. Stuart Schul-berg, one of the immigrants, can veri¬fy the situation. He recently receiveda telegram from his sister, quote“Apartment not available—very nicedoorway to be had—quite comfortable—must furnish own sleeping bag—Price reasonable, $JtO a month.”Bob Lawson and Dann Priest, twomore Maroon colleagues, have depart¬ed for the same parts . . . Tuesdaynight saw the culmination of Dann’sshort life at the U. of C. with a partyat his apartment, address MidwayDrexel. Going-away gifts showeredin: a bulbous bottle of , and acigar that*^ . ..Many nice peoplewere there including Jerry Zeigler,Al Seibert, Brace Patou and BudHoving, all the sharpest of the sharpfreshmen. The women that clutteredup and thus adorned the abode wereBeezie Rosenheim, Bobby James, thatenigma Sybil Ferriter, and Bobby(La) Shinn the charming N.U. trans¬fer who flew to us after one monthon the North Side.When it comes to . . .... the blooming brides frequenting theQuadrangles, the orchids go to ParkyWelsh Emmons. She steals the show...and where Neil is concerned, wecan only envy Parky.The Edgewater has become thehaunt of those who are attracted bycozy little parties. Two Fridays agosaw the gathering of mnay connois¬seurs, when it comes to such things.We ignore personages because theparty was cozy and they were con¬noisseurs.^Xittle Sleb " . . ....has anyone noticed, doesn't grinas much as formerly. What could havehappened, and was it last Tuesdaynight that it all began..,I hope you’ve all noticed that RoyLeslie Larson has returned to ourmidst after a few weeks of skiing andthings equally as physical. Also, it’sjust lately that I’ve fully appreciatedthe “retort snappee’s” of Paul Florian.Up until now it was his enviablejackets, that got me.Uamie Tomiyasu, one of my favor¬ite people in Kelly, has been laid upwith a sprained ankle which she de¬veloped while indulging in the art ofbasketball. (It has proved quite arugged game for Kelly inmates). Ithink she'll have recovered by Wed¬nesday for the Kelly-Quad Game,which by the way, should be veryrough, with both teams none tooready...By WERNER BAUMAt fast . . ....has come that long awaited pro¬motion, demotion, or whatever-you-want-to-call-it-motion from the sportsEasy to Fo/Zow/—this Arthur Murray Stepto Daintiness!•:^0 cloM or St30 date, guardyour sweetness and charm theway Arthur Murray dancersdo—with Odorono Cream.Non-greasy, non-gritty,gentle, no trouble to use—Odorono Cream ends perspira¬tion annoyance for 1 to 3 days!Follow this easy ArthurMurray step to daintiness-get Odorono Cream today 1lOf, 39f, 59^ sizes (plus tax).Th* Odorono Co., Inc.New Yorkpage to the civilized world...At lasthas come the chance to get out ofthat rut that sports lingo leads to...Bob Lawson did it and even learnedhow to write a presentable Bazaar...Maybe others of us can learn too,maybe...It's really too bad . .....that Bob isn't writing this thing.. .Because just now I've learned thathe isn’t the only one of his kind...For instance, the Theta Xi boys atArmour histitute have a picture of agreat big stork flapping his wingshanging in the front hall, and underthe picture of the stork, in typicalLawson fashion, it says: “Keep 'EmFlying.”But ail this Reminiscing . . .... really doesn’t do anybody any good.. .for Bob is nolonger with us... It all startedwith StuartSchulberg whocame back fromWash i n g t o nMonday to packhis things . . .With Stuartcame a lot of interesting stories...Especially about the sex ratio and theway things work in that town...Mendon’t stop and whistle at the prettywomen...It’s the women who whistleat the men.. .Stuart made it all soundso attractive that Lawson decided tosee,what he could do about the situa¬tion and on Tuesday he and Stuarthopped a slow freight back to “BoomTown”...That isn't all however . . ....for Dann Priest, the ice-hockeyplaying freshman, also warmed up tothe idea and left yesterday.. .So gooda talker is Schulberg that even PhilRieir, to whom the intellectual lifemeans everything, is contemplatinga similar move...Left behind withmemories is Jean Cragill who mustnow be satisfied with Lawson’s ChiPsi “badge”...Apologies to . . ....Helen Quisenben-y who is not inthe possession of Earl Ratzer's pin asreported in this column last week...From where does Minna Sachs get herinfo, anyway...Talking about reminiscing . . ... .the Betas certainly are good sports.. .For this Saturday night, with can¬dles and cake, they will celebrate thesecond birthday of that famous eventwhich, they feel, made them a realfraternity...Riezler LecturesTo Art ClubTJie daUUiThn/iootiFOUNDED IN 1902GIVES YOU MORE FOR YOUR MONEYITie Daily Maroon is the official atudentnewspaper of the University of Chicavo, pub¬lished mornings except Saturday. Sunday, andMonday during the Autumn, Winter, andSpring quarters by The Daily Maroon Com¬pany, 6831 University Avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:30 phone in stories to our printers,I’he Chief Printing Company. 148 West 62ndstreet. Telephones: Wentworth 6123 and 6124.The University of Chicago assumes no re¬sponsibility for any statements appearing inThe Daily Maroon, or for any contract enteredinto by The Daily Maroon._ The Daily Maroon expressly reserves therights of publication of any material appear¬ing in this paper. Subscription rates: 22.76 ayear, $4 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Entered as second class matter March 18,li)08. at the post office at Chicago, Illinois,luuler the act of March 3. 1879,MemberPissoc idled GDllebiole PressDistributor ofCblle6iale Di6eslBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialRICHARD HIMMEL, ChairmanJAMES BURTLEROBERT REYNOLDSBusinessRACHLIN, Business ManagerBOLKS, Advertising ManagerAdvertising Mgr.WILLIAM BELL, Circulation ManagerLYNN TUTTLE, ComptrollerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATESLawson, Nancy Lesser, Beata Mueller,Philip Rieff, Chloe Roth, Minna Sachs andElizabeth Jane WatersBUSINESS ASSOCIATESRichard Wallens, Alfred Bodian, Irene Forte,Milton Dauber, Muriel BurnsNight Editors; Nancy Lesser,Mike Berkson and Hy KriebergDr. Kurt R^izler, visiting professorfrom the “University of Exile,” willgive a public lecture on “The Portrait:Truth and Value” in Goodspeed 108next Wednesday evening at 8:15 underthe auspices of the University ArtClub. Tea will be served followingthe Lecture.Dr. Reizler, who is teaching Philos¬ophy here, is a former professor ofthe University of Berlin and severalother German Universities. He is cur¬rently teaching, among other courses,graduate courses in Aristotle.In the lecture Wednesday night,which will be followed by a discus¬sion, Dr. Reizler will endeavor toshow a relationship between Art,Criticism, and Philosophy. He willdiscuss the problem of the portraitin the light of its value as a replicaand as a work of art.Horne AttacksBenet ReviewQuelGeshmevitzTo the Editor of the Maroon,Sir:There appeared in the Maroon ofJanuary 23 and editorial, supposedlya criticism of the lecture given byMr. Stephen Vincent Benet. A moresnobbish, biased, and cynical report isdifficult to imagine!It is evident that Mr. Benet doesnot fulfill the requirements of whatthe critic believes a poet ought to be.That a poet may actually be an in¬dividual with a spark of imaginationwhose genius inspires others is en¬tirely omitted as part of the basisfor this criticism.This critio, looks with disdain uponsuch mediums as a weekly magazineand the movies which have broughtMr. Benet’s poetry to a wide audience.He deigns in his aloof manner toconcede that the evening was amusingif not profound.Such attempts at belittling eminentpersonages is by no means rare. It isThe week-end is not . . ... .to be dull by any means., .Tonightthe Reynolds Club will present its sec¬ond “C” dance.. .Scheduled on Satur¬day night is the Burton-Judson Win¬ter Formal and the Deke-Psi U. party.. .And after the basketball games theSigma Chis and ZBTs will throwhouse dances...'U.- Doo^u.., 'Th«r«'i M fn to roidlim lh«box If yoa'ra oof mIm ft■onitHitoa fmty. Tmt* • M fwto Mttoa at iwt oay rMtovraiit.Both havo to t»o IXACTLY RIGHT.Yoo'll Mto tho 4Kfforoaeo atssMsasffHomo of GREAT CHAMFIOH STIAKS590 DiVERSIY ILVD.940 Rush St. 1435 E. 5lsf St.Saa Nit# Watek . . . Broadcast940 Bash—12 to 4 •.■.—WINDToday on theQuadranglesSaturday. Start of three-day ChapelUnion Outing at the Indiana sanddunes. Leave from Chapel office at8:30. 'Sunday. 9:00-10:30. InterchurchSunday Breakfast Chat. Harold M.Kingsley, “Meeting of the Race Prob¬lem”. Howard Thurman, guest,Sunday. 7:30. Chapel Union SundayEvening meeting at the Gilkeys.a vain struggle by narrow minds toenlarge their amour-propre. To otherswho witness their rantings, they areridiculous.Harold HorneReviewer’s note:J’ai un amour propre M. Benet, il a unAmour propre toutes les enfant de leDieu ils ont leur amours propres.k it1162 E. 63rdPush Back SealsLEXPhone Dor. 1085Doors Open 12:30 Show Starts IKX) DailyFri.-Sat.-Jan. 30-31"LADY SCARFACE"andit GENE it SMILEYAUTRY BURNETTE“SIERRA SUE"• EXTRAl CARTOONSun.-Mon.-Tuas.February 1-2-3it GEORGE it ILONAbrent MASSEY"INTERNATIONAL LADY”andit GARY i, JOANgrant FONTAINE"SUSPICION"*★★★★★★★★★BARBARA ORTLUNDDear PagWalt, hara wa ara again on a ski-tripAnd this is cartalnly tha bast ona yet—the most wonderful weather—cold butglorious. Nobody minds tha cold thistrip—^I'va never seen so many leatherand suada jackets—You know the Hubis having a big sale of all the jacketsfrom tha upstairs department that were39.95 and $12.95 reduced to $6.98—Thay'ra in tha downstairs thrift shop nowCharlie has ona that's all suede—helooks like a Dartmouth winter carnivalscene and ha won't coma inside becauseha hates to taka it off. And one of theseleather wind-braakars doesn't need anyheavy sweaters or anything—It's wonder¬ful not to be all bundled up and stillbe warm enough.And in tha evenings we all sit aroundthe fire or dance—tha boys are allwearing those beautiful tweeds and wor-stads from tho Hub—that are only$34.50—and Dick has given me the extra pair of pants ha got on one suit for$39.50. I'll just hate to give them back—they're stunning.On the train on the way up all thefollows ware wearing tha most lusciousovar-coats—ona boy was showing me thezip-in lining in His coat and how he couldmake it either a top-coat or over-coatjust with a zipper—and ha told me it wasonly $39.50—and another boy piped up—"Wall, this one was only $34.50"—andproduced tha most luscious over-coat—It started a fight over which was thesmoothest—Tad couldn't make up hismind whether to wear his overcoat or hisnew combination wool and leather jacket.I can't tell you how impressed I amwith the atmosphere—you know—snow¬storms, pine-panelled walls, blazing fire¬places, man in tweeds with pipes,—it’sutterly divine.I think I'll buy one of those leatherjackets for myself—you know how coldthe Chicago campus is—right on theMidway—Everyone should have a wi nd'breaker—at only $6.98, too. It's amazing.Wa'ra going out skating now—and Ihave to run—meet you at class Mondaymorning—Until later.Goodbye,Shirleythe f HUBStcii,- un,l .luth.-,on, CHICAGO ■IPage TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 30. 1942TravelingBazaarBy SHIRLEY SMITHScratch the Surface in Pulse is nomore than a feeble attempt at mar¬ring finishes. As one writer of smutcolumns to another, even in this realmof journalism, if it can so be called,there are a few ethical traditionswithin which one should try and stay.The grossest example of oversteppingthese bonds is when writers have toresort to poking fun at the physicalinadequacies of their contemporaries.This is perhaps the lowest form ofseditious activity, and it would be¬hoove such people to pause and re-fiect, perhaps at their own reflections,before continuing such practices.Someday there might come someonewith an equally libellous and bigotedtongnie to reverse the flight of suchill-timed barbs. Before passing on tomore enjoyable subjects, it might beadded, that such columns should tryto maintain some semblance of truthin them...The most recent . . ... .“call to the front" has come fromWashington, D.C. A dire need for re¬porters has started the mass exodus.Wild tales have circulated for monthsconcerning the impossibility of secur¬ing housing facilities. Stuart Schul-berg, one of the immigrants, can veri¬fy the situation. He recently receiveda telegram from his sister, quote“Apartment not available—very nicedoorway to be had—quite comfortable—must furnish own sleeping bag—Price reasonable, $JtO a month.”Bob Lawson and Dann Priest, twomore Maroon colleagues, have depart¬ed for the same parts . . . Tuesdaynight saw the culmination of Dann’sshort life at the U. of C. with a partyat his apartment, address MidwayDrexel. Going-away gifts showeredin: a bulbous bottle of , and acigar that*^ . ..Many nice peoplewere there including Jerry Zeigler,Al Seibert, Brace Patou and BudHoving, all the sharpest of the sharpfreshmen. The women that clutteredup and thus adorned the abode wereBeezie Rosenheim, Bobby James, thatenigma Sybil Ferriter, and Bobby(La) Shinn the charming N.U. trans¬fer who flew to us after one monthon the North Side.When it comes to . . .... the blooming brides frequenting theQuadrangles, the orchids go to ParkyWelsh Emmons. She steals the show...and where Neil is concerned, wecan only envy Parky.The Edgewater has become thehaunt of those who are attracted bycozy little parties. Two Fridays agosaw the gathering of mnay connois¬seurs, when it comes to such things.We ignore personages because theparty was cozy and they were con¬noisseurs.^Xittle Sleb " . . ....has anyone noticed, doesn't grinas much as formerly. What could havehappened, and was it last Tuesdaynight that it all began..,I hope you’ve all noticed that RoyLeslie Larson has returned to ourmidst after a few weeks of skiing andthings equally as physical. Also, it’sjust lately that I’ve fully appreciatedthe “retort snappee’s” of Paul Florian.Up until now it was his enviablejackets, that got me.Uamie Tomiyasu, one of my favor¬ite people in Kelly, has been laid upwith a sprained ankle which she de¬veloped while indulging in the art ofbasketball. (It has proved quite arugged game for Kelly inmates). Ithink she'll have recovered by Wed¬nesday for the Kelly-Quad Game,which by the way, should be veryrough, with both teams none tooready...By WERNER BAUMAt fast . . ....has come that long awaited pro¬motion, demotion, or whatever-you-want-to-call-it-motion from the sportsEasy to Fo/Zow/—this Arthur Murray Stepto Daintiness!•:^0 cloM or St30 date, guardyour sweetness and charm theway Arthur Murray dancersdo—with Odorono Cream.Non-greasy, non-gritty,gentle, no trouble to use—Odorono Cream ends perspira¬tion annoyance for 1 to 3 days!Follow this easy ArthurMurray step to daintiness-get Odorono Cream today 1lOf, 39f, 59^ sizes (plus tax).Th* Odorono Co., Inc.New Yorkpage to the civilized world...At lasthas come the chance to get out ofthat rut that sports lingo leads to...Bob Lawson did it and even learnedhow to write a presentable Bazaar...Maybe others of us can learn too,maybe...It's really too bad . .....that Bob isn't writing this thing.. .Because just now I've learned thathe isn’t the only one of his kind...For instance, the Theta Xi boys atArmour histitute have a picture of agreat big stork flapping his wingshanging in the front hall, and underthe picture of the stork, in typicalLawson fashion, it says: “Keep 'EmFlying.”But ail this Reminiscing . . .... really doesn’t do anybody any good.. .for Bob is nolonger with us... It all startedwith StuartSchulberg whocame back fromWash i n g t o nMonday to packhis things . . .With Stuartcame a lot of interesting stories...Especially about the sex ratio and theway things work in that town...Mendon’t stop and whistle at the prettywomen...It’s the women who whistleat the men.. .Stuart made it all soundso attractive that Lawson decided tosee,what he could do about the situa¬tion and on Tuesday he and Stuarthopped a slow freight back to “BoomTown”...That isn't all however . . ....for Dann Priest, the ice-hockeyplaying freshman, also warmed up tothe idea and left yesterday.. .So gooda talker is Schulberg that even PhilRieir, to whom the intellectual lifemeans everything, is contemplatinga similar move...Left behind withmemories is Jean Cragill who mustnow be satisfied with Lawson’s ChiPsi “badge”...Apologies to . . ....Helen Quisenben-y who is not inthe possession of Earl Ratzer's pin asreported in this column last week...From where does Minna Sachs get herinfo, anyway...Talking about reminiscing . . ... .the Betas certainly are good sports.. .For this Saturday night, with can¬dles and cake, they will celebrate thesecond birthday of that famous eventwhich, they feel, made them a realfraternity...Riezler LecturesTo Art ClubTJie daUUiThn/iootiFOUNDED IN 1902GIVES YOU MORE FOR YOUR MONEYITie Daily Maroon is the official atudentnewspaper of the University of Chicavo, pub¬lished mornings except Saturday. Sunday, andMonday during the Autumn, Winter, andSpring quarters by The Daily Maroon Com¬pany, 6831 University Avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:30 phone in stories to our printers,I’he Chief Printing Company. 148 West 62ndstreet. Telephones: Wentworth 6123 and 6124.The University of Chicago assumes no re¬sponsibility for any statements appearing inThe Daily Maroon, or for any contract enteredinto by The Daily Maroon._ The Daily Maroon expressly reserves therights of publication of any material appear¬ing in this paper. Subscription rates: 22.76 ayear, $4 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Entered as second class matter March 18,li)08. at the post office at Chicago, Illinois,luuler the act of March 3. 1879,MemberPissoc idled GDllebiole PressDistributor ofCblle6iale Di6eslBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialRICHARD HIMMEL, ChairmanJAMES BURTLEROBERT REYNOLDSBusinessRACHLIN, Business ManagerBOLKS, Advertising ManagerAdvertising Mgr.WILLIAM BELL, Circulation ManagerLYNN TUTTLE, ComptrollerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATESLawson, Nancy Lesser, Beata Mueller,Philip Rieff, Chloe Roth, Minna Sachs andElizabeth Jane WatersBUSINESS ASSOCIATESRichard Wallens, Alfred Bodian, Irene Forte,Milton Dauber, Muriel BurnsNight Editors; Nancy Lesser,Mike Berkson and Hy KriebergDr. Kurt R^izler, visiting professorfrom the “University of Exile,” willgive a public lecture on “The Portrait:Truth and Value” in Goodspeed 108next Wednesday evening at 8:15 underthe auspices of the University ArtClub. Tea will be served followingthe Lecture.Dr. Reizler, who is teaching Philos¬ophy here, is a former professor ofthe University of Berlin and severalother German Universities. He is cur¬rently teaching, among other courses,graduate courses in Aristotle.In the lecture Wednesday night,which will be followed by a discus¬sion, Dr. Reizler will endeavor toshow a relationship between Art,Criticism, and Philosophy. He willdiscuss the problem of the portraitin the light of its value as a replicaand as a work of art.Horne AttacksBenet ReviewQuelGeshmevitzTo the Editor of the Maroon,Sir:There appeared in the Maroon ofJanuary 23 and editorial, supposedlya criticism of the lecture given byMr. Stephen Vincent Benet. A moresnobbish, biased, and cynical report isdifficult to imagine!It is evident that Mr. Benet doesnot fulfill the requirements of whatthe critic believes a poet ought to be.That a poet may actually be an in¬dividual with a spark of imaginationwhose genius inspires others is en¬tirely omitted as part of the basisfor this criticism.This critio, looks with disdain uponsuch mediums as a weekly magazineand the movies which have broughtMr. Benet’s poetry to a wide audience.He deigns in his aloof manner toconcede that the evening was amusingif not profound.Such attempts at belittling eminentpersonages is by no means rare. It isThe week-end is not . . ... .to be dull by any means., .Tonightthe Reynolds Club will present its sec¬ond “C” dance.. .Scheduled on Satur¬day night is the Burton-Judson Win¬ter Formal and the Deke-Psi U. party.. .And after the basketball games theSigma Chis and ZBTs will throwhouse dances...'U.- Doo^u.., 'Th«r«'i M fn to roidlim lh«box If yoa'ra oof mIm ft■onitHitoa fmty. Tmt* • M fwto Mttoa at iwt oay rMtovraiit.Both havo to t»o IXACTLY RIGHT.Yoo'll Mto tho 4Kfforoaeo atssMsasffHomo of GREAT CHAMFIOH STIAKS590 DiVERSIY ILVD.940 Rush St. 1435 E. 5lsf St.Saa Nit# Watek . . . Broadcast940 Bash—12 to 4 •.■.—WINDToday on theQuadranglesSaturday. Start of three-day ChapelUnion Outing at the Indiana sanddunes. Leave from Chapel office at8:30. 'Sunday. 9:00-10:30. InterchurchSunday Breakfast Chat. Harold M.Kingsley, “Meeting of the Race Prob¬lem”. Howard Thurman, guest,Sunday. 7:30. Chapel Union SundayEvening meeting at the Gilkeys.a vain struggle by narrow minds toenlarge their amour-propre. To otherswho witness their rantings, they areridiculous.Harold HorneReviewer’s note:J’ai un amour propre M. Benet, il a unAmour propre toutes les enfant de leDieu ils ont leur amours propres.k it1162 E. 63rdPush Back SealsLEXPhone Dor. 1085Doors Open 12:30 Show Starts IKX) DailyFri.-Sat.-Jan. 30-31"LADY SCARFACE"andit GENE it SMILEYAUTRY BURNETTE“SIERRA SUE"• EXTRAl CARTOONSun.-Mon.-Tuas.February 1-2-3it GEORGE it ILONAbrent MASSEY"INTERNATIONAL LADY”andit GARY i, JOANgrant FONTAINE"SUSPICION"*★★★★★★★★★BARBARA ORTLUNDDear PagWalt, hara wa ara again on a ski-tripAnd this is cartalnly tha bast ona yet—the most wonderful weather—cold butglorious. Nobody minds tha cold thistrip—^I'va never seen so many leatherand suada jackets—You know the Hubis having a big sale of all the jacketsfrom tha upstairs department that were39.95 and $12.95 reduced to $6.98—Thay'ra in tha downstairs thrift shop nowCharlie has ona that's all suede—helooks like a Dartmouth winter carnivalscene and ha won't coma inside becauseha hates to taka it off. And one of theseleather wind-braakars doesn't need anyheavy sweaters or anything—It's wonder¬ful not to be all bundled up and stillbe warm enough.And in tha evenings we all sit aroundthe fire or dance—tha boys are allwearing those beautiful tweeds and wor-stads from tho Hub—that are only$34.50—and Dick has given me the extra pair of pants ha got on one suit for$39.50. I'll just hate to give them back—they're stunning.On the train on the way up all thefollows ware wearing tha most lusciousovar-coats—ona boy was showing me thezip-in lining in His coat and how he couldmake it either a top-coat or over-coatjust with a zipper—and ha told me it wasonly $39.50—and another boy piped up—"Wall, this one was only $34.50"—andproduced tha most luscious over-coat—It started a fight over which was thesmoothest—Tad couldn't make up hismind whether to wear his overcoat or hisnew combination wool and leather jacket.I can't tell you how impressed I amwith the atmosphere—you know—snow¬storms, pine-panelled walls, blazing fire¬places, man in tweeds with pipes,—it’sutterly divine.I think I'll buy one of those leatherjackets for myself—you know how coldthe Chicago campus is—right on theMidway—Everyone should have a wi nd'breaker—at only $6.98, too. It's amazing.Wa'ra going out skating now—and Ihave to run—meet you at class Mondaymorning—Until later.Goodbye,Shirleythe f HUBStcii,- un,l .luth.-,on, CHICAGO ■ITHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 30. .1942Page ThreeChicago LeadersSupport DouglasHuxley Packs Hall With NewIdeas On Human EvolutionINames of several University pro¬fessors, including Dean Charles W.Giikey and Jerome G. Kerwin,. are in¬cluded on the list of a score of Chi¬cago civic and business leaders whohave accepted membership on theDouglas-for-senator committee thisweek, Edwin R. Embree, chairman ofthe committee, has announced. Theniovement indicates the growing sup¬port in the concentrated effort to winthe Illinois Democratic nomination forU.S. senator for Paul H. Douglas,University economist and member ofthe city council.Provisional headquarters for thecommittee were set up yesterday at5G5;1 Harper avenue, where a groupof volunteer workers are already busy(li.stributing primary nominating peti¬tions.Explaining the reason for theopening of the offices, Mr. Embreesaid:“The steady stream of telephonecalls and letters that we have receiv¬ed since the Douglas candidacy wasannounced the other day indicates alandslide of public opinion on his be¬half. So many people wanted to helpAlumni Mag.Repeats R.M.H.Latest edition of the Alumni Mag¬azine sports an article by PresidentHutchins entitled “The University AtWar” which purports that we arenow an instrumentality of total war.It further explains the new two yearB..\. plan.There is also a typical day in thelife of our president with pictures.It tells the sad sad tale of a littleman crouched in the corner at a party,a lonely social outcast. The guestswhisper “he doesn’t know anythingbut facts.”Interesting action photographs ofour Military Training Course inmaneuvers at the Lasker Estate, catchthe men leaping and pouring undermud fences. Interspersecf among thearticles are cute quips including thenow famous one about Keast andthe army officer.The three other articles include“Notes For A Dilettante” by DavidDaiches esoterically noted “the castlewalk where you find limpets in themorning,” “James Westfall Thompson,the Teacher,” by James Cate, an epi¬taph on a teacher by a former stu¬dent; and “Most Difficult Business,”the stHJond part by Dean GordonI.aing.4 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSEfor COLIEGE STUDENTS AND OIADUATISA tkonmfk. tHUnsivt, tttnop^pkie eomns—starting January 1, April 1, jmh 1, OeUsbarl,Intaruhng BookUt tant frta, witkomt obhgatiam— wnta or phono. No oohdtora omployod.moserbusiness collegeEAUL MOSEI, J.O«rH.S.Repilar Counosfor Begitutort, opon to HighSchool Graduatoa only, start frst Mondayof sack month. Advancod Canrots startany Mondtn. Day and Eotning. BsonmgConrsos opon to man.116 S. Michigan Avn^ Chicago, Kaadotph 4S47that it was necessary for us to opensome sort of provisional offices im¬mediately where activity on behalf ofAlderman Douglas could be centraliz¬ed. We expect shortly to announceplans not only for permanent head¬quarters in Chicago’s loop, but alsofor a number of offices in other Il¬linois communities.”■Name CastFor DA^sFoxes^^The tough assignment of carryinga play like “The Little Foxes” fallson the shoulders of a cast entirelynew to this campus, D.A. tryouts haveresulted in the casting of six of thenine characters.Brooks Lewis has won the leadingrole of Regina, sly, vicious, money-mad wife. Miss Lewis is a freshmanand a Delta Sigma pledge, WalterWelter, a sophomore, and DaveFletcher, a graduate student in Hu¬manities, take the roles of Uncle Benand Uncle Oscar, treacherous co¬schemers and back props to Regina.Bruno Friedman, a sophomore, willhave the part of Leo, and Anne-MarieLewis, another freshman, will beAlexandra, daughter and foil of Re¬gina. Edith Magerstadt, sophomore inthe Four Year College and a memberof D.A. since last year, is cast asBirdie, whom Regina’s brother mar¬ried for her name alone.Further tryouts for the parts ofHorace, Cal, and Addie will be heldlater. Eddie Armstrong is director,with Betsy Kuh as property manager,and Opal Wilson as stage manager.Frank Cliffe is on sets, and Bob Mac-Duffy, on lights.Coast Guard MenTo EntertainAt Own PartySeventy-five coast guards of Bur-ton-Judson Court will be entertainedat a tea dance by members of theIda Noyes Council and their friendsSunday from 3 to 5 at Ida NoyesHall. The guests will also do theirshare of entertaining, for Coast Guardtalent will provide music and a floorshow.Each council member will be assist¬ed as hostess by three other universitywomen. Miss Marguerite Kidwell ofthe faculty will act as official hostess.The program was planned at ajoint meeting of a committee of coast-guarders and representatives of theIda Council. Margie Sullivan is chair¬man of the council’s committee. Oth¬ers on the committee are Eloise Good¬ie, Carol Russell, and Elizabeth Spen¬cer.Other women’s groups of the uni¬versity are also formulating plans toprovide recreation for navy men re¬siding on the quadrangles. After Feb¬ruary 1, Ida Noyes facilities for bad¬minton, bowling, and swimming willalso be available to them from 3 to 6on Sunday afternoons.PHYSICAL FITNESSEQUIPMENT .Sweat ShirtsMEN’SSweat Pants!Wool SocksTennis ShoesFlannel ShortsWOMEN’ 5 White Shirts •Tennis ShoesBathing SlippersMEN'S SUPPLIESWOMEN'S SUPPLIESbartleh gym.IDA NOYES HALLU.of'C. Bookstore5802 EllisJulian Huxley is a social thinkerand a poet as well as a great scientist,but his lecture on “Evolution Up ToDate” Tuesday evening to a packedMandel Hall audience was in a scien¬tific vein.In the first portion of his speech,Huxley spoke of the various scientific.factors which have entered into evolu¬tion. The lecturer pointed out suchfactors as genetics, adaptation, andisolation which cause changes in germplasma of offspring and finally bringabout evolutionary development. Hislecture brought out the recently ac¬cepted doctrine that it is none ofthese three factors alone but an in¬teraction of all three which enter intothe changes in germ plasma.Evolution Only Among ManAfter pointing out these scientificconcept's to a largely lay and by thistime rather bored audience, Huxleysuddenly launched into a discussion ofI the great evolutionary progress of man.He made the statement that man wasnow the “sole trustee” of evolutionaryIInvite CoastGuard To PlayMore than 500 Coast Guards livingon campus have been invited to theperformance of “Shadow and Sub¬stance” which the University Playersare giving in Mandel Hall, February6.Gordon Northrup and Norma Evanshave the leads in the play which isthe Players’ first production thisquarter. They portray the partswhich Sir Cedric Hardwicke and JulieHaydon played in the Broadway ver¬sion of Paul Vincent Carroll’s Irishtragedy. Others in the cast include:Hartley Pfeil, Lolly Chevlin, Jim Sie¬mens, Lois Wells, and Milton Smith.Directing the play is Frank Grover,who has staged most of the other Un¬iversity Players’ productions. LollyChevlin is handling publicity, whileBob MacDuffee is stage manager.Blackfriars—(Continued from page one)The poster contest which shouldclose today has been extended toMonday in the hope that some postersand designs treating a Hollywoodtheme will be handed in. Any winningentries will be rewarded with twotickets to the show.• Phil Jaynes, Steve Graham, GregKuellner, and Jim Frankel top thelist of “chorus boys”. Next come VicMintek, Mort Warshaner, EugeneJohnson, Mike Backson, AubreyMoore, Mack Rieth, Marvin Mitchell,Walter Goodman, Bob Rabens, Sey¬mour Hirschfield, Bob Tully, JohnGreen, Leon Cohen, Wally Griffith,Lyle Johnson, Duval Jaros. The sixunderstudies are: Bill Mayer-Oakes,Mark Beaubin, Charles Bickert, HarryDavis, Ted DeLooze, Alan McCloud.Professor Frederick Deibler ofNorthwestern University will speakon “Academic Freedom In Wartime”at a meeting of the Society of Friendsat 10:45 Monday morning.Professor Deibler is a former pres¬ident of the American Association ofUniversity Professors.U. T.1131-1133 E. 55th St.COMPLETE SELECTIONOF BEERS ANDOTHER BEVERAGESFREE DELIVERYMID. 0524'bLATZ and SIEBENS BEERSprogress. Evolutionary progress cannot be going on among the othergroups of organisms, for had therebeen such a development through theyears, man would long have beenovercome by lower organisms. Evenin spite of one of man’s greatest in¬efficiencies, that of exterminating andmaking war upon his own species,other species have been unable to ad¬vance ahead of him.Huxley vs. U. of C. ProfsThis last declaration perked up theinterest of the audience, but it alsoaroused a great deal of controversyamong scientists of the university.Some contend that Huxley is justifiedin saying that man is the only speciesJ. Schwab AndA. Sun ParlorOn Hillel SlateJoseph Schwab, assistant professorof Biological Sciences in the College,will speak at the Hillel Fireside to beheld tonight at 8 in the Sun Parlorof Ida Noyes.Three years ago Mr. Schwab wonthe $1,000 prize given to the most pop¬ular teacher in the college. He iswidely known on the campus as springquarter lecturer in Biological Sciences,as general “father confessor” formany of the student body, and forhis very crowded discussion sections.He has been a keen advocate of theNew Plan and stresses in his discus¬sions the type of reasoning which theNew Plan emphasizes.It is of great interest that Mr.Schwab has refused to disclose anyinformation as to the subject of histalk.A social hour, with refreshments,will follow the talk and discussjon.11VanPaassen ToSpeak HereTickets for the Pierre Van Paassenlecture, which the Hillel Foundationis presenting at Mandel Hall onThursday night, February 19, havebeen placed on sale at the Informa¬tion Office, International House, andthe Rockefeller Chapel office. Theysell at fifty cents, including tax, forstudents. Mr. Van Paassen, noted for¬eign correspondent and author of“Days of Our Years,” will speak on,“Civilization: Crisis and Decision”.which is making evolutionary ad¬vances today. Others maintain thatevidence of lower species shows thatthey are advancing at the same rateas man as far as evolution of germplasm is concerned.One well known zoologist explainsthat Huxley has shifted his measuringstick of evolution from a purelyphysical to a cultural and social evo¬lution. In the latter phase of evolutionman has truly gained a great dealover the lower species, but this hagbeen done purely by a learningprocess and not through purely plas-mal evolution. Therefore, while Hux¬ley talked almost solely of evolutionthrough the action of the germ plasmawhen talking of the lower organisms,he shifted without explanation tomeasuring evolution by man on a rea¬soning and learning basis.Hold All DayReligious FestPalos Park will be the scene of theall day outing which is to be a featureof the weekvlong Campus Confex’enceon Religion and the Social Order. Thedate of the outing has been changedfrom February 12 to February 14. •David J. Heffernan, assistant sup¬erintendent of schools in Cook County,and Leo Honor, executive secretary ofthe Board of Jewish Education, havebeen announced as the speakers at theroundtable on February 11. The con¬ference committee also announced A.Eustace Haydon and Jerome Kerwinas slated to speak at discussions dur¬ing the week.Eleven professors have promised toaid in the conference. They include:A. J. Brumbaugh, R. V. Morrill, Al¬fred Emerson, Joseph Schwab, ZensSmith, Andre Gronika, H. N. Wieman,Robert Havighurst, Ross Snyder, DanWilliams, and A. C. Benjamin.Trend—(Continued from page one)Some of the staff as well as thelocation of the Trend offices has beenchanged since the initial issue lastquarter. Trend’s new quarters are theold Cap and Gown offices in Lexing¬ton Hall. The shakeup in the businessstaff has made J. Frederick Gustafsonbusiness manager. He replaces JackKnuepfer, who has left the Universityto join the British-Ainerican Am¬bulance Corp in Egypt.READSwedenborgHe heard God calling out of every need,And saw life’s deeper worship in a deed;Could find no power in all the worlds to looseA soul to freedom hut a life of use;Could find no rest on any unseen shoreBut in the Love that was our rest before.Back in the abyss of thcologic nightHe was the one man who beheld the Light;His were the eyes on the front of that dark ageWhich read the Truth upon the judgment page.And thus this guest of the angelic spheresLet out a gleam of Heaven upon the years!EDWIN MARKHAM.From his poem "Swedenborg"“DIVINE LOVE AND WISDOM”70c in paperat University and other bookstores.KTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 30. .1942Page ThreeChicago LeadersSupport DouglasHuxley Packs Hall With NewIdeas On Human EvolutionINames of several University pro¬fessors, including Dean Charles W.Giikey and Jerome G. Kerwin,. are in¬cluded on the list of a score of Chi¬cago civic and business leaders whohave accepted membership on theDouglas-for-senator committee thisweek, Edwin R. Embree, chairman ofthe committee, has announced. Theniovement indicates the growing sup¬port in the concentrated effort to winthe Illinois Democratic nomination forU.S. senator for Paul H. Douglas,University economist and member ofthe city council.Provisional headquarters for thecommittee were set up yesterday at5G5;1 Harper avenue, where a groupof volunteer workers are already busy(li.stributing primary nominating peti¬tions.Explaining the reason for theopening of the offices, Mr. Embreesaid:“The steady stream of telephonecalls and letters that we have receiv¬ed since the Douglas candidacy wasannounced the other day indicates alandslide of public opinion on his be¬half. So many people wanted to helpAlumni Mag.Repeats R.M.H.Latest edition of the Alumni Mag¬azine sports an article by PresidentHutchins entitled “The University AtWar” which purports that we arenow an instrumentality of total war.It further explains the new two yearB..\. plan.There is also a typical day in thelife of our president with pictures.It tells the sad sad tale of a littleman crouched in the corner at a party,a lonely social outcast. The guestswhisper “he doesn’t know anythingbut facts.”Interesting action photographs ofour Military Training Course inmaneuvers at the Lasker Estate, catchthe men leaping and pouring undermud fences. Interspersecf among thearticles are cute quips including thenow famous one about Keast andthe army officer.The three other articles include“Notes For A Dilettante” by DavidDaiches esoterically noted “the castlewalk where you find limpets in themorning,” “James Westfall Thompson,the Teacher,” by James Cate, an epi¬taph on a teacher by a former stu¬dent; and “Most Difficult Business,”the stHJond part by Dean GordonI.aing.4 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSEfor COLIEGE STUDENTS AND OIADUATISA tkonmfk. tHUnsivt, tttnop^pkie eomns—starting January 1, April 1, jmh 1, OeUsbarl,Intaruhng BookUt tant frta, witkomt obhgatiam— wnta or phono. No oohdtora omployod.moserbusiness collegeEAUL MOSEI, J.O«rH.S.Repilar Counosfor Begitutort, opon to HighSchool Graduatoa only, start frst Mondayof sack month. Advancod Canrots startany Mondtn. Day and Eotning. BsonmgConrsos opon to man.116 S. Michigan Avn^ Chicago, Kaadotph 4S47that it was necessary for us to opensome sort of provisional offices im¬mediately where activity on behalf ofAlderman Douglas could be centraliz¬ed. We expect shortly to announceplans not only for permanent head¬quarters in Chicago’s loop, but alsofor a number of offices in other Il¬linois communities.”■Name CastFor DA^sFoxes^^The tough assignment of carryinga play like “The Little Foxes” fallson the shoulders of a cast entirelynew to this campus, D.A. tryouts haveresulted in the casting of six of thenine characters.Brooks Lewis has won the leadingrole of Regina, sly, vicious, money-mad wife. Miss Lewis is a freshmanand a Delta Sigma pledge, WalterWelter, a sophomore, and DaveFletcher, a graduate student in Hu¬manities, take the roles of Uncle Benand Uncle Oscar, treacherous co¬schemers and back props to Regina.Bruno Friedman, a sophomore, willhave the part of Leo, and Anne-MarieLewis, another freshman, will beAlexandra, daughter and foil of Re¬gina. Edith Magerstadt, sophomore inthe Four Year College and a memberof D.A. since last year, is cast asBirdie, whom Regina’s brother mar¬ried for her name alone.Further tryouts for the parts ofHorace, Cal, and Addie will be heldlater. Eddie Armstrong is director,with Betsy Kuh as property manager,and Opal Wilson as stage manager.Frank Cliffe is on sets, and Bob Mac-Duffy, on lights.Coast Guard MenTo EntertainAt Own PartySeventy-five coast guards of Bur-ton-Judson Court will be entertainedat a tea dance by members of theIda Noyes Council and their friendsSunday from 3 to 5 at Ida NoyesHall. The guests will also do theirshare of entertaining, for Coast Guardtalent will provide music and a floorshow.Each council member will be assist¬ed as hostess by three other universitywomen. Miss Marguerite Kidwell ofthe faculty will act as official hostess.The program was planned at ajoint meeting of a committee of coast-guarders and representatives of theIda Council. Margie Sullivan is chair¬man of the council’s committee. Oth¬ers on the committee are Eloise Good¬ie, Carol Russell, and Elizabeth Spen¬cer.Other women’s groups of the uni¬versity are also formulating plans toprovide recreation for navy men re¬siding on the quadrangles. After Feb¬ruary 1, Ida Noyes facilities for bad¬minton, bowling, and swimming willalso be available to them from 3 to 6on Sunday afternoons.PHYSICAL FITNESSEQUIPMENT .Sweat ShirtsMEN’SSweat Pants!Wool SocksTennis ShoesFlannel ShortsWOMEN’ 5 White Shirts •Tennis ShoesBathing SlippersMEN'S SUPPLIESWOMEN'S SUPPLIESbartleh gym.IDA NOYES HALLU.of'C. Bookstore5802 EllisJulian Huxley is a social thinkerand a poet as well as a great scientist,but his lecture on “Evolution Up ToDate” Tuesday evening to a packedMandel Hall audience was in a scien¬tific vein.In the first portion of his speech,Huxley spoke of the various scientific.factors which have entered into evolu¬tion. The lecturer pointed out suchfactors as genetics, adaptation, andisolation which cause changes in germplasma of offspring and finally bringabout evolutionary development. Hislecture brought out the recently ac¬cepted doctrine that it is none ofthese three factors alone but an in¬teraction of all three which enter intothe changes in germ plasma.Evolution Only Among ManAfter pointing out these scientificconcept's to a largely lay and by thistime rather bored audience, Huxleysuddenly launched into a discussion ofI the great evolutionary progress of man.He made the statement that man wasnow the “sole trustee” of evolutionaryIInvite CoastGuard To PlayMore than 500 Coast Guards livingon campus have been invited to theperformance of “Shadow and Sub¬stance” which the University Playersare giving in Mandel Hall, February6.Gordon Northrup and Norma Evanshave the leads in the play which isthe Players’ first production thisquarter. They portray the partswhich Sir Cedric Hardwicke and JulieHaydon played in the Broadway ver¬sion of Paul Vincent Carroll’s Irishtragedy. Others in the cast include:Hartley Pfeil, Lolly Chevlin, Jim Sie¬mens, Lois Wells, and Milton Smith.Directing the play is Frank Grover,who has staged most of the other Un¬iversity Players’ productions. LollyChevlin is handling publicity, whileBob MacDuffee is stage manager.Blackfriars—(Continued from page one)The poster contest which shouldclose today has been extended toMonday in the hope that some postersand designs treating a Hollywoodtheme will be handed in. Any winningentries will be rewarded with twotickets to the show.• Phil Jaynes, Steve Graham, GregKuellner, and Jim Frankel top thelist of “chorus boys”. Next come VicMintek, Mort Warshaner, EugeneJohnson, Mike Backson, AubreyMoore, Mack Rieth, Marvin Mitchell,Walter Goodman, Bob Rabens, Sey¬mour Hirschfield, Bob Tully, JohnGreen, Leon Cohen, Wally Griffith,Lyle Johnson, Duval Jaros. The sixunderstudies are: Bill Mayer-Oakes,Mark Beaubin, Charles Bickert, HarryDavis, Ted DeLooze, Alan McCloud.Professor Frederick Deibler ofNorthwestern University will speakon “Academic Freedom In Wartime”at a meeting of the Society of Friendsat 10:45 Monday morning.Professor Deibler is a former pres¬ident of the American Association ofUniversity Professors.U. T.1131-1133 E. 55th St.COMPLETE SELECTIONOF BEERS ANDOTHER BEVERAGESFREE DELIVERYMID. 0524'bLATZ and SIEBENS BEERSprogress. Evolutionary progress cannot be going on among the othergroups of organisms, for had therebeen such a development through theyears, man would long have beenovercome by lower organisms. Evenin spite of one of man’s greatest in¬efficiencies, that of exterminating andmaking war upon his own species,other species have been unable to ad¬vance ahead of him.Huxley vs. U. of C. ProfsThis last declaration perked up theinterest of the audience, but it alsoaroused a great deal of controversyamong scientists of the university.Some contend that Huxley is justifiedin saying that man is the only speciesJ. Schwab AndA. Sun ParlorOn Hillel SlateJoseph Schwab, assistant professorof Biological Sciences in the College,will speak at the Hillel Fireside to beheld tonight at 8 in the Sun Parlorof Ida Noyes.Three years ago Mr. Schwab wonthe $1,000 prize given to the most pop¬ular teacher in the college. He iswidely known on the campus as springquarter lecturer in Biological Sciences,as general “father confessor” formany of the student body, and forhis very crowded discussion sections.He has been a keen advocate of theNew Plan and stresses in his discus¬sions the type of reasoning which theNew Plan emphasizes.It is of great interest that Mr.Schwab has refused to disclose anyinformation as to the subject of histalk.A social hour, with refreshments,will follow the talk and discussjon.11VanPaassen ToSpeak HereTickets for the Pierre Van Paassenlecture, which the Hillel Foundationis presenting at Mandel Hall onThursday night, February 19, havebeen placed on sale at the Informa¬tion Office, International House, andthe Rockefeller Chapel office. Theysell at fifty cents, including tax, forstudents. Mr. Van Paassen, noted for¬eign correspondent and author of“Days of Our Years,” will speak on,“Civilization: Crisis and Decision”.which is making evolutionary ad¬vances today. Others maintain thatevidence of lower species shows thatthey are advancing at the same rateas man as far as evolution of germplasm is concerned.One well known zoologist explainsthat Huxley has shifted his measuringstick of evolution from a purelyphysical to a cultural and social evo¬lution. In the latter phase of evolutionman has truly gained a great dealover the lower species, but this hagbeen done purely by a learningprocess and not through purely plas-mal evolution. Therefore, while Hux¬ley talked almost solely of evolutionthrough the action of the germ plasmawhen talking of the lower organisms,he shifted without explanation tomeasuring evolution by man on a rea¬soning and learning basis.Hold All DayReligious FestPalos Park will be the scene of theall day outing which is to be a featureof the weekvlong Campus Confex’enceon Religion and the Social Order. Thedate of the outing has been changedfrom February 12 to February 14. •David J. Heffernan, assistant sup¬erintendent of schools in Cook County,and Leo Honor, executive secretary ofthe Board of Jewish Education, havebeen announced as the speakers at theroundtable on February 11. The con¬ference committee also announced A.Eustace Haydon and Jerome Kerwinas slated to speak at discussions dur¬ing the week.Eleven professors have promised toaid in the conference. They include:A. J. Brumbaugh, R. V. Morrill, Al¬fred Emerson, Joseph Schwab, ZensSmith, Andre Gronika, H. N. Wieman,Robert Havighurst, Ross Snyder, DanWilliams, and A. C. Benjamin.Trend—(Continued from page one)Some of the staff as well as thelocation of the Trend offices has beenchanged since the initial issue lastquarter. Trend’s new quarters are theold Cap and Gown offices in Lexing¬ton Hall. The shakeup in the businessstaff has made J. Frederick Gustafsonbusiness manager. He replaces JackKnuepfer, who has left the Universityto join the British-Ainerican Am¬bulance Corp in Egypt.READSwedenborgHe heard God calling out of every need,And saw life’s deeper worship in a deed;Could find no power in all the worlds to looseA soul to freedom hut a life of use;Could find no rest on any unseen shoreBut in the Love that was our rest before.Back in the abyss of thcologic nightHe was the one man who beheld the Light;His were the eyes on the front of that dark ageWhich read the Truth upon the judgment page.And thus this guest of the angelic spheresLet out a gleam of Heaven upon the years!EDWIN MARKHAM.From his poem "Swedenborg"“DIVINE LOVE AND WISDOM”70c in paperat University and other bookstores.KPage FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 30. 1942INDIANA PLAYS HERE TOMORROWrestlersMeet IowaBoasting an undefeated wrestlingsquad up to the present time, CoachSpyros K. Vorres and his grapplingproteges travel to Iowa City, Iowa,to wrestle the University of Iowa to¬morrow evening.Previously, the Maroons have de¬feated the Illinois State Normal Col¬lege, Bradley Tech, Northwestern, andWheaton College. The tilt with Iowawill be Chicago’s second conferenceencounter this year.Last week Iowa slaughtered Brad¬ley Tech University 31-0, while thelocal squad beat Bradley by the slimmargin of 21-10. During the past dec¬ade Chicago has been the jinx teamof the conference to Iowa. They havebeaten them ten consecutive times withthe exception of last year, when theMaroons suffered a 25-3 setback.As wrestling teams go, Iowa hasthe unanimous approval of weatheredcritics to take the conference cham¬pionship this year without any diffi¬culty. Three regular Hawkeyes whoscored overwhelming victories in theMaroon meet last year are again toappear in the lineup.Wrestlers NeededGoing through a tough schedulewith a depleted crew. Coach Vorresbelieves that unless some freshmanand other interested upperclassmencome out for the sport, chartces forhaving at least a squad with averagecalibre next year will be very slim.Vorres is not interested in men withexperience, but prefers to have menwho have not been taught any wrest¬ling systems before, and who are will¬ing to incorporate wrestling tech¬niques as a new experience.Captain Sammy Zafros, who wrest¬led his last collegiate match againstNorthwestern last Saturday, has leftfor the Army Air Corps. AviationCadet Sam Zafros is now in serviceat the Pilot Replacement Center, atKelly Field, Texas.Andy ZimmerEleven MeetMinnesotaTrackMenToDuel FreshIn their first pre-season meet ofthe year, the varsity indoor-tracksquad will race the freshmen trackaspirants this afternoon at 4 in theFieldhouse.During the coming week, MichiganState University will hold a fresh¬man meet at their home grounds andmail the results to Coach Ned Mer-riam, who will then compare MichiganFresh from their victory over theUniversity of Illinois swimming team,the University swimmers journey toMinneapolis Saturday to meet theMinnesota team in Minnesota’s firstBig Ten meet of the current season.Eleven swimmers have been select¬ed by Coach McGillivray to face thestrong Minnesota team; Bill Baugher,John Crosby, Bill and Lynn Leach,Craig Leman, Paul Jordan, JohnSimmler, Joe Blakeman, and HankHeinichen are the swimmers chosenfor the trip. Minnesota has experi¬enced men competing in the distanceevents, diving, backstroke, and breaststroke, and, according to Mr. McGilli¬vray, should, if past performances areany indication, prove to be a formid¬able opponent.'The Maroon distance swimmershave made a better showing thanusual this season, and, if they canmake any kind of a stand in Satur¬day’s contest, the University squadshould have a better than even chanceof winning the meet. With threeweeks of intensive practice behindthem as well as one Conference meet,the squad will be in much better formthan it was for the Illinois meet.State’s results with the Maroon fresh¬man results.Time trials have been coming alongquite satisfactorily. The first Big Tenmeet of the season will be held onFebruary 7 against a well trainedPurdue University squad here at theFieldhouse.Members of the Student So¬cial Committee and the Wash¬ington Prom Benefit Commit¬tee are asked to obtain theirbids from Bob Dean today.Bean will be in Mandel Cor¬ridor all morning.Jack Fans. Aggressive MaroonEd NelsonJohn LoganHoosier Forward. . Junior ForwardFive'A'TeamsUndefeatedBy WERNER BAUMLatest Intramural basketball stand¬ings show that Phi Kappa Psi holdsthe leadership in the Woodlawn sec¬tion of the “A” league while the Al¬pha Delts and D.U.’s are tied for thelead in the University section.The Phi Psis, reputedly the strong¬est team in any league, are unblem¬ished in three trials but are closelyfollowed by the Dekes and Phi Deltswho have won two victories.Delta Upsilon also holds down thelead in the Alpha part of the “B”league by virtue of three victorie.swhile all the other teams have lost atleast one game. In the Beta section ofthis league the Phi Psis again rankat the top, also having chalked upthree victories without a loss.Not counting last night’s games,six of the novice league teams arestill undefeated. They are Alpha Delt“C”, Delta Upsilon “C”, Psi Upsilon“C”, Delta Upsilon “E”, Deke “C” andPsi Upsilon “D”.The “A” league race is just enter¬ing the stage which should determinethe final outcome. In the Woodlawnsection is Delta Kappa Epsilon, thedefending champion. 'The Dekes, how¬ever, must face the Phi Delts and PhiPsis, both undefeated, in their lasttwo games and popular opinion seemsto be in favor of a Phi Psi victory.Freddy Shaver and his mates havedemonstrated a fast and hard type ofbasketball, cruel to the opponents, inthe first three games.Alpha Delta Phi, last season’snumber two team, faces only oneStill audible in his approval ofspirit that has never left his tJthrough a long string of disastrldefeats. Coach Nels Norgren willhis charges against an Indianaketball team glorying in the spotlilafter its recent victories over Wise]sin and Purdue.Once again in a recent interviiNorgren reiterated what has comebe a swan song, briefly that Indi;like all other outfits in the WestConference is a dangerous outfit raing with the best in the midlanpossessing in speed and marksmansqualities to off-set its comparatlack of height.Praise Effort“The boys put forth a marveleffort at Ohio State, but it wa-enough to make up for our handiin the matter of height,’’ Norgrenserted, and added further that ,1.Fons and Dave Zimmerman are pducing the much-valued aggressbrand of play.At the starting whi.stlc it willthe usual Fons, Nelson, Heinen, W,enberg, Oakley or Crosbie five twill take the floor, with the resergetting their accustomed numberminutes in, Norgren stated.The Hoosiers, who started the stson not too auspiciously, have elbo\\their way into the spotlight by hting the jackpot on 32 percent of thtattempts at pay dirt and triumpover Wisconsin and Purdue, ashould more than give the game bnot too potent Maroons their mone\worth Saturday night.Strong SquadSeven lettermen, the hangover frothe national collegiate championstwo years ago, form the nucleusthe Hoosier aggregation abetted by Icapable group of Sophomores and rserves. Versatile Andy Zimmer, wllpossesses talents enabling him to pe!form in any one of the three positioron a basketball team, is the fair-haied eye-catcher and shooter extriordinary and will prove nastier thsever to the Maroons because of hskyscraping height of 6’5’’.The bright test of the reserves a:Johnny Logan, Irwin Swanson, Wiliam Fry, Ed Denton, and WilliaTrophy and from this bunch wprobably come the rest of the firfive.The last three years have provito be the days of plenty and of fruiful harvests for Hoosier Head BranMcCracken who has presented the fscitizens of that basketball crazy laiwith twenty-eight victories and oigdefeats, which puts them well ahein Big Ten standings for the last ftyears.more strong opponent, Delta UpsiliIn the “B” league the D.U.’s aremost certain to win their section whthe Phi Psis may yet run into troutThe Deke “B’’ team, although orbeaten, has yet to meet the Phi Pand may hand them a surprise. Tand heavy, the Dekes may be ableoutlast the rough Phi Psi aggreftion.Play in the novice league is d(nitely for fun. Most of the men on 1novice league teams never see a bketball exceept on game days. 1“Big Houses” evidently seem to hra definite -advantage, however, fmost of their teams are still undefeed.COLLEGE NIGHT every fridayRUSS MORGAN and his orchestrawith Jana, lijg ht ni ng sketch art¬ist, ^ F red d y and Betty Roberts,dancers, Phyllis Lynne, Alyce Cerf,George Henry, Clarence Mel terand the Dorothy Dorben Dancersin the Marine Dining Room of theEDGEWATER BEACH HOTELGet Student Rate Tickets at Maroon OfficePage FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 30. 1942INDIANA PLAYS HERE TOMORROWrestlersMeet IowaBoasting an undefeated wrestlingsquad up to the present time, CoachSpyros K. Vorres and his grapplingproteges travel to Iowa City, Iowa,to wrestle the University of Iowa to¬morrow evening.Previously, the Maroons have de¬feated the Illinois State Normal Col¬lege, Bradley Tech, Northwestern, andWheaton College. The tilt with Iowawill be Chicago’s second conferenceencounter this year.Last week Iowa slaughtered Brad¬ley Tech University 31-0, while thelocal squad beat Bradley by the slimmargin of 21-10. During the past dec¬ade Chicago has been the jinx teamof the conference to Iowa. They havebeaten them ten consecutive times withthe exception of last year, when theMaroons suffered a 25-3 setback.As wrestling teams go, Iowa hasthe unanimous approval of weatheredcritics to take the conference cham¬pionship this year without any diffi¬culty. Three regular Hawkeyes whoscored overwhelming victories in theMaroon meet last year are again toappear in the lineup.Wrestlers NeededGoing through a tough schedulewith a depleted crew. Coach Vorresbelieves that unless some freshmanand other interested upperclassmencome out for the sport, chartces forhaving at least a squad with averagecalibre next year will be very slim.Vorres is not interested in men withexperience, but prefers to have menwho have not been taught any wrest¬ling systems before, and who are will¬ing to incorporate wrestling tech¬niques as a new experience.Captain Sammy Zafros, who wrest¬led his last collegiate match againstNorthwestern last Saturday, has leftfor the Army Air Corps. AviationCadet Sam Zafros is now in serviceat the Pilot Replacement Center, atKelly Field, Texas.Andy ZimmerEleven MeetMinnesotaTrackMenToDuel FreshIn their first pre-season meet ofthe year, the varsity indoor-tracksquad will race the freshmen trackaspirants this afternoon at 4 in theFieldhouse.During the coming week, MichiganState University will hold a fresh¬man meet at their home grounds andmail the results to Coach Ned Mer-riam, who will then compare MichiganFresh from their victory over theUniversity of Illinois swimming team,the University swimmers journey toMinneapolis Saturday to meet theMinnesota team in Minnesota’s firstBig Ten meet of the current season.Eleven swimmers have been select¬ed by Coach McGillivray to face thestrong Minnesota team; Bill Baugher,John Crosby, Bill and Lynn Leach,Craig Leman, Paul Jordan, JohnSimmler, Joe Blakeman, and HankHeinichen are the swimmers chosenfor the trip. Minnesota has experi¬enced men competing in the distanceevents, diving, backstroke, and breaststroke, and, according to Mr. McGilli¬vray, should, if past performances areany indication, prove to be a formid¬able opponent.'The Maroon distance swimmershave made a better showing thanusual this season, and, if they canmake any kind of a stand in Satur¬day’s contest, the University squadshould have a better than even chanceof winning the meet. With threeweeks of intensive practice behindthem as well as one Conference meet,the squad will be in much better formthan it was for the Illinois meet.State’s results with the Maroon fresh¬man results.Time trials have been coming alongquite satisfactorily. The first Big Tenmeet of the season will be held onFebruary 7 against a well trainedPurdue University squad here at theFieldhouse.Members of the Student So¬cial Committee and the Wash¬ington Prom Benefit Commit¬tee are asked to obtain theirbids from Bob Dean today.Bean will be in Mandel Cor¬ridor all morning.Jack Fans. Aggressive MaroonEd NelsonJohn LoganHoosier Forward. . Junior ForwardFive'A'TeamsUndefeatedBy WERNER BAUMLatest Intramural basketball stand¬ings show that Phi Kappa Psi holdsthe leadership in the Woodlawn sec¬tion of the “A” league while the Al¬pha Delts and D.U.’s are tied for thelead in the University section.The Phi Psis, reputedly the strong¬est team in any league, are unblem¬ished in three trials but are closelyfollowed by the Dekes and Phi Deltswho have won two victories.Delta Upsilon also holds down thelead in the Alpha part of the “B”league by virtue of three victorie.swhile all the other teams have lost atleast one game. In the Beta section ofthis league the Phi Psis again rankat the top, also having chalked upthree victories without a loss.Not counting last night’s games,six of the novice league teams arestill undefeated. They are Alpha Delt“C”, Delta Upsilon “C”, Psi Upsilon“C”, Delta Upsilon “E”, Deke “C” andPsi Upsilon “D”.The “A” league race is just enter¬ing the stage which should determinethe final outcome. In the Woodlawnsection is Delta Kappa Epsilon, thedefending champion. 'The Dekes, how¬ever, must face the Phi Delts and PhiPsis, both undefeated, in their lasttwo games and popular opinion seemsto be in favor of a Phi Psi victory.Freddy Shaver and his mates havedemonstrated a fast and hard type ofbasketball, cruel to the opponents, inthe first three games.Alpha Delta Phi, last season’snumber two team, faces only oneStill audible in his approval ofspirit that has never left his tJthrough a long string of disastrldefeats. Coach Nels Norgren willhis charges against an Indianaketball team glorying in the spotlilafter its recent victories over Wise]sin and Purdue.Once again in a recent interviiNorgren reiterated what has comebe a swan song, briefly that Indi;like all other outfits in the WestConference is a dangerous outfit raing with the best in the midlanpossessing in speed and marksmansqualities to off-set its comparatlack of height.Praise Effort“The boys put forth a marveleffort at Ohio State, but it wa-enough to make up for our handiin the matter of height,’’ Norgrenserted, and added further that ,1.Fons and Dave Zimmerman are pducing the much-valued aggressbrand of play.At the starting whi.stlc it willthe usual Fons, Nelson, Heinen, W,enberg, Oakley or Crosbie five twill take the floor, with the resergetting their accustomed numberminutes in, Norgren stated.The Hoosiers, who started the stson not too auspiciously, have elbo\\their way into the spotlight by hting the jackpot on 32 percent of thtattempts at pay dirt and triumpover Wisconsin and Purdue, ashould more than give the game bnot too potent Maroons their mone\worth Saturday night.Strong SquadSeven lettermen, the hangover frothe national collegiate championstwo years ago, form the nucleusthe Hoosier aggregation abetted by Icapable group of Sophomores and rserves. Versatile Andy Zimmer, wllpossesses talents enabling him to pe!form in any one of the three positioron a basketball team, is the fair-haied eye-catcher and shooter extriordinary and will prove nastier thsever to the Maroons because of hskyscraping height of 6’5’’.The bright test of the reserves a:Johnny Logan, Irwin Swanson, Wiliam Fry, Ed Denton, and WilliaTrophy and from this bunch wprobably come the rest of the firfive.The last three years have provito be the days of plenty and of fruiful harvests for Hoosier Head BranMcCracken who has presented the fscitizens of that basketball crazy laiwith twenty-eight victories and oigdefeats, which puts them well ahein Big Ten standings for the last ftyears.more strong opponent, Delta UpsiliIn the “B” league the D.U.’s aremost certain to win their section whthe Phi Psis may yet run into troutThe Deke “B’’ team, although orbeaten, has yet to meet the Phi Pand may hand them a surprise. Tand heavy, the Dekes may be ableoutlast the rough Phi Psi aggreftion.Play in the novice league is d(nitely for fun. Most of the men on 1novice league teams never see a bketball exceept on game days. 1“Big Houses” evidently seem to hra definite -advantage, however, fmost of their teams are still undefeed.COLLEGE NIGHT every fridayRUSS MORGAN and his orchestrawith Jana, lijg ht ni ng sketch art¬ist, ^ F red d y and Betty Roberts,dancers, Phyllis Lynne, Alyce Cerf,George Henry, Clarence Mel terand the Dorothy Dorben Dancersin the Marine Dining Room of theEDGEWATER BEACH HOTELGet Student Rate Tickets at Maroon Officehed High on • Stool, called the tallest in the booh, Marian Powers, a freshman at Rocldord College, un¬is some of the treasures in the Old Booh Room at MaddoxThe room is filled annually with second-hand volumesI7th 18th, and 19th centuries, shipped to this mid-ern campus from a London boohshop.It loohs lihe the bashetball developed a "flat" as Fred Lewis ofLong Island University dribbles along, but the lightning-lihe ac¬tion of the Speedray camera is responsible for the impression.The ball was caught at the moment of impact with the floor, Clos-inq in on Lewis is Warren Taylor (9) of the University of Oregon.L.I.U. ehed out a 33-31 victory. int«rn4tjon4iHeads Meet — Pained expressions resulted when Ed Fl^ccusChristine Waples bumped their heads while going after the ball dur-' soccer match between boys of Haverford College and girls of Bryn'f College. >«r,de WorldDiscins Army Dcbitcrs — Members of the cadet debating team at United States MilitaryAcademy are shown mahing recordings for use in criticisms of their technique in radio debating.Capt. FHerbert G. Sparrow (right), public speaking adviser, gives Cadet P. B. Woodward somemicrophone tips. ^MMHhed High on • Stool, called the tallest in the booh, Marian Powers, a freshman at Rocldord College, un¬is some of the treasures in the Old Booh Room at MaddoxThe room is filled annually with second-hand volumesI7th 18th, and 19th centuries, shipped to this mid-ern campus from a London boohshop.It loohs lihe the bashetball developed a "flat" as Fred Lewis ofLong Island University dribbles along, but the lightning-lihe ac¬tion of the Speedray camera is responsible for the impression.The ball was caught at the moment of impact with the floor, Clos-inq in on Lewis is Warren Taylor (9) of the University of Oregon.L.I.U. ehed out a 33-31 victory. int«rn4tjon4iHeads Meet — Pained expressions resulted when Ed Fl^ccusChristine Waples bumped their heads while going after the ball dur-' soccer match between boys of Haverford College and girls of Bryn'f College. >«r,de WorldDiscins Army Dcbitcrs — Members of the cadet debating team at United States MilitaryAcademy are shown mahing recordings for use in criticisms of their technique in radio debating.Capt. FHerbert G. Sparrow (right), public speaking adviser, gives Cadet P. B. Woodward somemicrophone tips. ^MMHSkimming Campus Smokestacks■<’' -k ^'iJT w. ^Iy7“ ■^ ,4pr T^ ‘I-wK'T - };University of Michisan, Ann Arbor, MichisanBrown University, Providence, Rhode IslandBirmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, Alabama.Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut.Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.Skimming Campus Smokestacks■<’' -k ^'iJT w. ^Iy7“ ■^ ,4pr T^ ‘I-wK'T - };University of Michisan, Ann Arbor, MichisanBrown University, Providence, Rhode IslandBirmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, Alabama.Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut.Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.M«tt tli« CkampI — DeanH. J. Reed (risht), and F. C.Hockema, both of PurdueUniversity pose with LoyalAlumnus 4th, 18-months-oldAn9us steer judsed championat the International Live StockExposition. Ac*«☆A Special First AidG>urtc for national defensefinds these four MassachusettsState College co-eds practic¬ing the prone pressure methodof artificial respiration. Dem-onstratinq are Phyllis Drink-water (left) and Priscilla Scott,while the subjects are ShirleyO'Connell (left) and PeggyGale. To attend the coursethese girls are giving up datesand study hours one eveningevery week.TWTTrlTrtiss Test Pilot BILL WARDTESTS DIVE-BOMBERS FOR THE NAVY... SHARESTHE HAVY MAH'S PREFERENCE FOR CAMELSa#-THECIGARETTE OFCOSTLIERTOBACCOSICOTINEan the average of the 4 otherlargest-selling brands tested•.. less than any of them...according to independentntific tests of the smoke itself!J Kc\ ivtids Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem. Ninth CarolinaNOTHING COMES EVENCLOSE TO CAMEL5 WITH ME.they're milder By far.AND, MAN, WHAT ASWELL FLAVORTHE SMOKESLOWER-BURNING CAMELSCONTAINS28%M«tt tli« CkampI — DeanH. J. Reed (risht), and F. C.Hockema, both of PurdueUniversity pose with LoyalAlumnus 4th, 18-months-oldAn9us steer judsed championat the International Live StockExposition. Ac*«☆A Special First AidG>urtc for national defensefinds these four MassachusettsState College co-eds practic¬ing the prone pressure methodof artificial respiration. Dem-onstratinq are Phyllis Drink-water (left) and Priscilla Scott,while the subjects are ShirleyO'Connell (left) and PeggyGale. To attend the coursethese girls are giving up datesand study hours one eveningevery week.TWTTrlTrtiss Test Pilot BILL WARDTESTS DIVE-BOMBERS FOR THE NAVY... SHARESTHE HAVY MAH'S PREFERENCE FOR CAMELSa#-THECIGARETTE OFCOSTLIERTOBACCOSICOTINEan the average of the 4 otherlargest-selling brands tested•.. less than any of them...according to independentntific tests of the smoke itself!J Kc\ ivtids Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem. Ninth CarolinaNOTHING COMES EVENCLOSE TO CAMEL5 WITH ME.they're milder By far.AND, MAN, WHAT ASWELL FLAVORTHE SMOKESLOWER-BURNING CAMELSCONTAINS28%66£&VWelU ColleAnsW«'^^***®^Uraine Teninsa*'““ rs.Tii - i*- j*"' “\w^A'-SfEishi Feel Up —This action tool< place when Franh Bosart (85) of Oklahoma A. & M. failed to scorein the first period of qame with City Collese of New York Jack Herron (66) a teammate tries to score onthe rebound but C.CT.N.y.’s Claude Phill ips (5) and Leo Levine (9) block the shot. C.C.N.Y. won thebattle 39-30.Ac»*mr 4,#Crammingit's that time of the year again when most college students must pre¬pare for exams . . . and Ainslie Pryor of Southwestern College,Memphis, Tenn., is doing just that. He claims a little relaxation byreading magazines is helpful during a long cram session.hUvertySlidinf to a Three Point Landins — To gain admiit<the "Hay Hop", informal party held in the Field HouseSt. Lours, guests were forced to crawl through a 12-foot tua waxed slide. If you think it wasn’t fun look at Doristoward the hay pile.66£&VWelU ColleAnsW«'^^***®^Uraine Teninsa*'““ rs.Tii - i*- j*"' “\w^A'-SfEishi Feel Up —This action tool< place when Franh Bosart (85) of Oklahoma A. & M. failed to scorein the first period of qame with City Collese of New York Jack Herron (66) a teammate tries to score onthe rebound but C.CT.N.y.’s Claude Phill ips (5) and Leo Levine (9) block the shot. C.C.N.Y. won thebattle 39-30.Ac»*mr 4,#Crammingit's that time of the year again when most college students must pre¬pare for exams . . . and Ainslie Pryor of Southwestern College,Memphis, Tenn., is doing just that. He claims a little relaxation byreading magazines is helpful during a long cram session.hUvertySlidinf to a Three Point Landins — To gain admiit<the "Hay Hop", informal party held in the Field HouseSt. Lours, guests were forced to crawl through a 12-foot tua waxed slide. If you think it wasn’t fun look at Doristoward the hay pile.High Flyer — Muriel Smith, acrobatic drum majorette for the University of Miami, fliesthrough the air demonstrating one of the stunts she performed for the huge Orange Bowlcrowd on New Year’s Day. AcmeShe Zoomed Option Seles — To spur the sales of Senior Week options at MassachusettsInstitute of Technology, Committee Chairman Shepard Y. Tyree, left, and Thomas T. Crowleyasked petite Northeast Airline stewardess Dotty lisley to help. Her appearance at Tech causeda big rush'of option-buying, ogling ’42-ers. Techphoto by WunschSoronadc in iko Dark — Hood College girls helped to create a real Christmas atmosphere by singing carols throughout;; the town of Frederick, Maryland, in the early morning hours.ol p'®:Wdif Ha Hat a Ckanca Any#ay — Undoubtedly the most far-seeing politician on the University of Oregon campus is Bill Belt,candidate for president in 1964. Bill has built up a large organiza¬tion and achieved national notoriety within the short space of 15months since he first threw his hat into the mythical ring. His petslogan is "A Cinch with Belt". Ottcti nwte by ArndtHigh Flyer — Muriel Smith, acrobatic drum majorette for the University of Miami, fliesthrough the air demonstrating one of the stunts she performed for the huge Orange Bowlcrowd on New Year’s Day. AcmeShe Zoomed Option Seles — To spur the sales of Senior Week options at MassachusettsInstitute of Technology, Committee Chairman Shepard Y. Tyree, left, and Thomas T. Crowleyasked petite Northeast Airline stewardess Dotty lisley to help. Her appearance at Tech causeda big rush'of option-buying, ogling ’42-ers. Techphoto by WunschSoronadc in iko Dark — Hood College girls helped to create a real Christmas atmosphere by singing carols throughout;; the town of Frederick, Maryland, in the early morning hours.ol p'®:Wdif Ha Hat a Ckanca Any#ay — Undoubtedly the most far-seeing politician on the University of Oregon campus is Bill Belt,candidate for president in 1964. Bill has built up a large organiza¬tion and achieved national notoriety within the short space of 15months since he first threw his hat into the mythical ring. His petslogan is "A Cinch with Belt". Ottcti nwte by ArndtFraternity Dollars for Dafonsa — Everett Wilson, Financechairman oF the Atlas Club, national proFessional OsteopathicFraternity of the Kirhsville Collese oF Osteopathy and Surgery,Kirhsville, Mo., inspects the Fraternity's Christmas tree whichhas been loaded with "sreenbacks”. Each member oF theKirksville chapter save a "sreenback" as did many oF theiralumni to help trim the tree. The dollars were used to buyDeFense Bonds which will be applied towards the Fraternity'shouse mortsage. CollcsMtc DiscM Ptwto by HunterPity tho Poor Coach — When the three Parks brothers, Charles, CliFFord; and Stancently enrolled at Northeastern University, Boston, Freda Pearce, secretary, had her hatFull keeping them straight. But think oF the bewilderment track coach Jerry Latton will f,in the spring when they report For practice on the cinder track. All three were outstandhigh school perFormers. CoiUsw** D.9*« PtKwo by iCoufkl in War Zono — Members oF the San Jose (CaliF.) State College Football teawho were stranded in Honolulu by the war, are shown as they go through guard duty dat the Famous Punahon School. 'BuyDefenseBondsk!$S/ Kiss Polica■ *>;At Augustana C^lege, Sioux Fails, S. D., studfiitsare reviving the Folk dance craze. Most popularamong the predominantly Scan<finavian student bodyisJ^ '^Kios, Kloaf^ohta** tkrnowtiated here by Ma^ jorte Di«t|stlh, a fresbman. First sbe assumes a w»^Caivorlis^*) waii-flower eatt, them the smiling "Yttak" acceptance to die **Vilde cfodanse?'*The pictures at bottom show the four teasing "Kjos*"poses the poHca*ist ilitkts.C«ltel»tc llli^a nmw try Otwi>Fraternity Dollars for Dafonsa — Everett Wilson, Financechairman oF the Atlas Club, national proFessional OsteopathicFraternity of the Kirhsville Collese oF Osteopathy and Surgery,Kirhsville, Mo., inspects the Fraternity's Christmas tree whichhas been loaded with "sreenbacks”. Each member oF theKirksville chapter save a "sreenback" as did many oF theiralumni to help trim the tree. The dollars were used to buyDeFense Bonds which will be applied towards the Fraternity'shouse mortsage. CollcsMtc DiscM Ptwto by HunterPity tho Poor Coach — When the three Parks brothers, Charles, CliFFord; and Stancently enrolled at Northeastern University, Boston, Freda Pearce, secretary, had her hatFull keeping them straight. But think oF the bewilderment track coach Jerry Latton will f,in the spring when they report For practice on the cinder track. All three were outstandhigh school perFormers. CoiUsw** D.9*« PtKwo by iCoufkl in War Zono — Members oF the San Jose (CaliF.) State College Football teawho were stranded in Honolulu by the war, are shown as they go through guard duty dat the Famous Punahon School. 'BuyDefenseBondsk!$S/ Kiss Polica■ *>;At Augustana C^lege, Sioux Fails, S. D., studfiitsare reviving the Folk dance craze. Most popularamong the predominantly Scan<finavian student bodyisJ^ '^Kios, Kloaf^ohta** tkrnowtiated here by Ma^ jorte Di«t|stlh, a fresbman. First sbe assumes a w»^Caivorlis^*) waii-flower eatt, them the smiling "Yttak" acceptance to die **Vilde cfodanse?'*The pictures at bottom show the four teasing "Kjos*"poses the poHca*ist ilitkts.C«ltel»tc llli^a nmw try Otwi>(•'"''fd klh/r?r‘d> teoJi"’'«'»«l-OiTomcf ©f the Tiiticf — Reorganized after four years of inactivity, the Interna¬tional Relations Club at Colgate University has made the building of a club librarya major project. The university has given the club a room in the Student Union, fac¬ulty members have helped with collecting specialized books and the men nowhave about 300 volumes catalogued for their own private reading.Arck«ry Champ — The Garandmay be the army's choice of weap¬ons, but the bow and arrow stilt hasa place in the life of Lt. John Rich¬ard Sedgwick, Jr., recently of theUniversity of Hawaii, now stationedat Schofield Barracks, Oahu. Lt.Sedgwick copped individual hon¬ors in the 1941 national men’s in¬tercollegiate telegraphic archerytournament.NATIONAL AOVEITISINOSEKVICi 11^^.4t0 M«aitM A«^'««, N««"^Mlt40# N». MkMfMi A«mw, Oricat*Builds Glass **Body*' to Study Heart — Dr. Victor Lorber, in¬structor of physiology at the University of Minnesota, has devised thismechanical circulatory system to study the causes of heart failure. Glassand rubber tubes act as veins and arteries while two large cylinders repre¬sent lungs. Acme<t>iK*trMi omc«i mMiaatiHNaOmim Sm PiHMiMa Lw AmAIm(•'"''fd klh/r?r‘d> teoJi"’'«'»«l-OiTomcf ©f the Tiiticf — Reorganized after four years of inactivity, the Interna¬tional Relations Club at Colgate University has made the building of a club librarya major project. The university has given the club a room in the Student Union, fac¬ulty members have helped with collecting specialized books and the men nowhave about 300 volumes catalogued for their own private reading.Arck«ry Champ — The Garandmay be the army's choice of weap¬ons, but the bow and arrow stilt hasa place in the life of Lt. John Rich¬ard Sedgwick, Jr., recently of theUniversity of Hawaii, now stationedat Schofield Barracks, Oahu. Lt.Sedgwick copped individual hon¬ors in the 1941 national men’s in¬tercollegiate telegraphic archerytournament.NATIONAL AOVEITISINOSEKVICi 11^^.4t0 M«aitM A«^'««, N««"^Mlt40# N». MkMfMi A«mw, Oricat*Builds Glass **Body*' to Study Heart — Dr. Victor Lorber, in¬structor of physiology at the University of Minnesota, has devised thismechanical circulatory system to study the causes of heart failure. Glassand rubber tubes act as veins and arteries while two large cylinders repre¬sent lungs. Acme<t>iK*trMi omc«i mMiaatiHNaOmim Sm PiHMiMa Lw AmAImBob Davidoff (17) of New York University tries to takethe ball away from Charles Stanton of Syracuse Univer¬sity durins the hard-fousht basketball qame betweenthese rival schools. N.Y.U. topped the Orangemen by34-31 » tnif rr\^tton^//Now If >•«*« L«». to CljjSS, y«uV. Ul. for Br..l.f„| - To p-omo.e bette Mudent'lacull,relations (Iowa) Collesc s Student Council sponsored a novel idea. They started the eiuMO clock classes fifteen minutec e;trl\/.anrJ coruoi-l :.a: f j i ^ t,, N.wuiit.11 spun^orea a novel Idea. I hey started the eighto’clock classes fifteen minutes early and served breakfast, consisting of doughnuts, coffee, and bananasin class. This picture was taken in the speech class of Mr. Dave Phillips. Coii*9ioie Dtg«tt Photo bv StdiDr«x«l Honors Founder — Manon S. Powell, President iWoman’s Student Government Association, and Gilbert S. K*Vice President of the Men’s Student Council, represent Drexeltute of Technology students in honoring Anthony Joseph Drexelfounded the. college In 1891, at fiftieth Founder’s Day ccremiAID yOURCOUNTRY’S ESSENTIALDEFENSEratf#.By BuyingSAVINGS STAMPSarid BONDS TODAYiiri*Take a Back Seat, Eddie! — Eddie Cantor with his five daughters and no sons is"also ran". President Julian A. MePhee of California Polytechnic College, SaObispo, California, has gone him one better — he has six daughters and no sons iIronical part of the situation is that MePhee heads a college which has some 900 boNO girls. Coii«9i«it Pho«o F.Bob Davidoff (17) of New York University tries to takethe ball away from Charles Stanton of Syracuse Univer¬sity durins the hard-fousht basketball qame betweenthese rival schools. N.Y.U. topped the Orangemen by34-31 » tnif rr\^tton^//Now If >•«*« L«». to CljjSS, y«uV. Ul. for Br..l.f„| - To p-omo.e bette Mudent'lacull,relations (Iowa) Collesc s Student Council sponsored a novel idea. They started the eiuMO clock classes fifteen minutec e;trl\/.anrJ coruoi-l :.a: f j i ^ t,, N.wuiit.11 spun^orea a novel Idea. I hey started the eighto’clock classes fifteen minutes early and served breakfast, consisting of doughnuts, coffee, and bananasin class. This picture was taken in the speech class of Mr. Dave Phillips. Coii*9ioie Dtg«tt Photo bv StdiDr«x«l Honors Founder — Manon S. Powell, President iWoman’s Student Government Association, and Gilbert S. K*Vice President of the Men’s Student Council, represent Drexeltute of Technology students in honoring Anthony Joseph Drexelfounded the. college In 1891, at fiftieth Founder’s Day ccremiAID yOURCOUNTRY’S ESSENTIALDEFENSEratf#.By BuyingSAVINGS STAMPSarid BONDS TODAYiiri*Take a Back Seat, Eddie! — Eddie Cantor with his five daughters and no sons is"also ran". President Julian A. MePhee of California Polytechnic College, SaObispo, California, has gone him one better — he has six daughters and no sons iIronical part of the situation is that MePhee heads a college which has some 900 boNO girls. Coii«9i«it Pho«o F.