Vol. 42, No. 47 Z-149I he UoiLu meJwon.THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. FRIDAY. JANUARY 9. 1942Three CentsBdsketeersFace ToughN.U.f Badger SquadsProbable Lineups:CHICAGOVS. NORTHWESTERNNelsonf.ClaaonFonsf.GrahamHeinenc.ClawsonWagenbergg-WendlandOakleyg-KrugerNels Norgren’s proteges face one oftheir toughest week-ends this week.Tomorrow night Northwestern, nowconsidered a leading candidate for thechampionship will invade the ChicagoFieldhouse and on Monday morningat 9:30 the squad will entrain for anengagement the same night with thepresent champions, the WisconsinBadgers, at Madison.Northwestern will shoot a veteranteam at the Maroons. With the ex¬ception of Otto Graham, who had de¬veloped into the team's star, all theWildcat starters participated in thePurple’s 41 to 36 victory over Chicagolast year.Wildcats SurpriseThe Wildcats surprised everyonelast Monday when they handed Min¬nesota, winner of five pre-seasongames, a 49-38 decision. Graham, whohas played every minute of both con¬ference games, led the Purple inscoring with 20 points. According toCoach Lonborg, however, Graham isnot in his full stride as yet.“Otto is not playing half as wellas he can. He is not in good basket¬ball shape yet,” the Wildcat coachNef Sees WorldWar II Hinder¬ing IndustryAlthough it is well known that warshave contributed to the progress ofindustry by stimulating invention, inmost cases warfare has been an effec¬tive drug on industrial development,said Dr. John U. Nef, professor ofeconomic history.Dr. Nef pointed out that some his¬torians have underestimated the in-tluence of war as a destructive factoron industrial advancement.Which Influence?“The historical evidence suggeststhat this side is more important thanthe other,” he said. “But which in¬fluence—the stimulating or the de¬structive—is in the ascendency inconnection with a particular era anda particular country, depends uponthe length of the wars and the natureof the part played by the country inthem.”.4s examples of how wars can stim¬ulate industry in one^^nation and createbottlenecks in another. Dr. Nef dis¬cussed the effect of European wars ofthe sixteenth and early seventeenthcenturies upon the industrial develop¬ment of England and the continentalnations.Postive EffectIn the case of England, he said,where little fighting was done on homesoil, the wars had a positive effect,playing an important role in bringingabout the “industrial revolution” ofthe period.Dr. Nef summarized the four prin¬cipal ways in which these wars pro¬moted the rise of the Industrial revo¬lution as follows:1. “By increasing the demand fornew chemic^ substances such as sul¬phur and saltpetre and particularlyfor products of the subsoil, above allfor metallic ores to be made into iron,steel, copper, brass, and lead objectsof all kinds for protection, and forhurling at the enemy.2. “By encouraging the growth oflarge-scale enterprise, required inextracting and mining the raw ma¬terials of war and manufacturingthem into armaments.(Continued on page four)said, “and he should start making hislong shots soon. Why, Otto can shootbetter than that...”Purple ConfidentThe Purple, of course, are quiteconfident of victory. Only yesterdayThe Daily Northwestern called theMaroons the “conference weak sister.”In attempt to stem the Wildcat’sdrive to the title, Norgren will againstart his team with sophomores hold¬ing down the center and one of theguard spots. Norgren is convincedthat the Chicago quintet is capable of(Continued on page three)TerraquaA Warming Home Warm¬ing^ at 7:30 tonight, sponsor¬ed by the outing club, Terra¬qua, marks the o f f i c i a Iopening of the skating rink,under the North Stands inStagg Field.Although admission is free,there will be an exhibition offigure skating, which will con¬clude by 9:30, to give thespectators an opportunity toattend the Ida Noyes OpenHouse.Hitch-HikingMagician Mys¬tifies CampusThe Kappa Sigmas have housedsome funny things in their day, butnow they have Oscar. Oscar — fullname Oscar Gutheil — is a hitch-hik¬ing magician imported from OhioState U. Here to attend some magi¬cian’s conclave, Gutheil spends hissummers touring the country in oth¬ers’ vehicles, performs amazingsleight-of-hand at various points alongthe way.By-means of these excursions, Gu¬theil t makes his expenses at OhioState, where he is a junior. He sup¬plements his summer roadwork withlocal performances at the Ohio capi¬tal city, whose residents affectionate¬ly refer to him as the “ColumbusWizard.”Covers U.S. in 35 DaysAs a hitch-hiker, Gutheil does well.His first excursion in the summer of’40 covered the forty-eight states,Canada, and Mexico in thirty - fivedays. His present speed record is fromthe' West Coast to Columbus in fourand a half days flat.Accompanying him on his expedi¬tions is a non-descript combination ofsuitcase, scooter, and portable radio.Wheeling it along at his side, it in¬trigues people, he says. In fact, heattributes many of his rides to thedevice, which has “Oscar the Hitch¬hiking Magician” painted on it inlarge luminous letters.Performances UniqueHis performances on these tripshave sometimes been extremely unique.At Yosemite Falls he baffled an audi¬ence of some 6,000 people who weresitting somewhere in the vicinity ofthe bottom of the falls. Later, in oneof the Brown Derby restaurants inLos Angeles, he caused a minor stirby beginning to fish about for hisdinner with a disappearing castingrod.Shortly now, Oscar and scooter de¬vice will depart for home, after firstgiving the Kappa Sigs a sampling ofhis talent. Eventually, he will wind upin the army, he supposes, where heasserts he will be useful in keepingup morale.Twelfth NightTwelfth Night Party will be heldfrom 9:00 to 12:00 at Ida Noyes to¬night. Admission is free.AliensGet ColdShoulderEmbarrassingIncidents AriseMany small, but embarrassing, inci¬dents have occured as a result of therestrictions imposed on enemy aliensin this city. Recently, two Americancitizens, Japanese girls bom in thiscountry, were not permitted to ridethe I.C., as the over-zealous officialconsidered them enemy aliens. Chi¬nese citizens have also been subjectedto minor indignities, and, as a result,are wearing buttons proclaiming theirnationality.Refugee RegulationsThere are 12 Germans, 2 Japanese,and 1 Italian at International House,although the Italian student and themajority of the German students areenemy in name only—they are mostlyJewish refugees who managed to es¬cape from their dictator “liberators.”The refugees are subject to thesame regulations as the Japanese stu¬dents, although their occidental ap¬pearance naturally makes thingseasier if they choose to travel by Illi¬nois Central.Any change of residence must bereported in advance, and permits areissued to anyone who wishes totravel.Telegrams BannedStudents had difficulty in obtainingmoney at first, as all their funds werefrozen; the order has since been re¬voked, and they now have access tothe money they have deposited in thiscountry. Naturally, they are notallowed to communicate with anyonein their homelands, and, in addition,they may send no cables or telegramsin this country.Cameras and radios confiscatedfrom Int House residents are grad¬ually finding their way back to theirowners, as it is well known that thelatter are not going to engage in anyFifth Column activities.HaydonA. Eustace Haydon, profes¬sor of Comparative Religions,will speak in RockefellerChapel Sunday morning, ateleven.Haydon is the author ofseveral philosophical worksincluding “The Question ofthe Ages” and “Man’s Searchfor the Good Life.” One ofChapel Union’s favorite dis¬cussion leaders. ProfessorHaydon is one of the foremostproponents of the HumanisticDoctrine.EnrollmentDrops 4% AtCollegeEnrollment at University College,Dean Clem O. Thompson stated yes¬terday, is only four per cent belowlast quarter. “Everything taken intoconsideration, this is marvelous,” hecommented. “I shouldn’t have beensurprised if it had gone down as muchas fifty per cent.” New registrationsmay still bring the count up, he added.Two new courses are being offeredfor the first time this quarter at thecollege. An education course dealingwith the elementary school, andanother in pharmacology, “presentedwith specific reference to the needsand interests of chemists”, are thetwo additions.Start 170AlbijiTns InAPODriveWith only two days of the twoweek drive gone. Alpha Phi 0-mega*s Defense Stamp Drive hasalready started 170 on stamp al¬bums, chapter president DonPanarese announced yesterday.Each book holds five dollarsworth of stamps when filled, andsome have made initial pur¬chases as high as two dollars.New Booth in CommonsArrangements are now beingmade by the Alpha Phis to openanother booth, probably inHutchinson Commons. The drivewill continue throughout nextweek. ,In addition to help from Wom¬en's Federation, Wyvern haslent the drive aid by furnishingwomen to staff the booths, Pan¬arese said. Those helping out areEileen Clinton, Mary May,Marge Bivens, Yvonne Martin,Mary Lou Landis, Marge Sulli¬van, and Edith Surry. RozannePetrozz, an independent, is alsoworking at the booth.Will Dorothy Lamour Aid?The possibility that DorothyLamour, noiv in Chicago helpingout the Red Cross, could be per¬suaded to trek down to theQuadrangles to give the driveadded publicity, is being con¬sidered as a desirable contin¬gency.Student-FacultyTableS tuden t-Facidty Tablemeets at noo7i today in theprivate dining room of Hutch-inso7i Commons. The facultymembers present will be A. P.Scott of the Humanities De¬partment, Trevino of theSpanish Department, Rossbyof the University's Meteorol¬ogy division, and Adeline D.Link and Zens Smith of thedivision of the Physical Sci¬ences.Student-Faculty Table meet¬ings have been transferredfrom Ida Noyes to the Com¬mons' private dining room, toprovide space for a largerattendance.Episcopals F ormLuncheonGroupAnderson Society, the UniversityEpiscopal student group, will haveluncheon together at a table in theCloister Club Wednesday noons. Epis¬copal students and their friends areinvited to join in the fellowship ofthese meetings together. Prominentguests will often be present as anadded attraction. Inquire at the cash¬ier’s desk for the number of the table.Frosh Bull SessionThe freshmen Bull Session willhold its first meeting of the quar¬ter this afternoon at 3:30 in theW.W.A. room at Ida Noyes.DiscussFate OfMusicalsPossibilityOf MergerThe fate of Mirror and Blackfriarsis being discussed with three or fourpossibilities raised. Dean of StudentsAaron J. Brumbaugh, Assistant Deanof Students William J. Scott, Black-friars Abbot Dale Johnson, and Mir¬ror Director William Randall met yes¬terday but nothing specific was an¬nounced.Separate Shows UnprofitableBoth Dean Scott and Johnson, how¬ever, revealed that some arrangementwill probably be made, with the verydefinite possibility that the two or¬ganizations will merge to put on ashow.Pointing out that the expenses ofneither show could be pared much be¬low $3600, Dean Scott said that itwould probably be unprofitable forboth organizations should they eachput on a show.Other Possibilities“Mirror is attended mainly by thefaculty and the community more thanthe student body in proportion any¬way; while Blackfriars draws wellfrom the alumni,” Dean Scott contin¬ued. “But it is too difficult to predictanything on the basis of the past.”Other possibilities besides the mer¬ger are complete withdrawal of bothorganizations or the abandonment ofBlackfriars and the establishment ofa new organization for the durationof the war.Red Cross GetsProceeds OfCage DanceIn step with present trends, TheReynolds Club Council will present acombined basketball and Winter “C”Dance tomorrow night in both loungesof the club.The proceeds of the dance will goto the benefit of the Red Cross, withadmission price scaling thirty-threecents including tax.Johnny Osborne’s OrchestraBy way of keeping up “the finestring of bands presented at the ‘C’’‘Dances during the past quarter”,mediator Hal Steffe announced thatJohnny Osborne and his orchestrawould play for the inaugural dance.Osborne was a featured saxophonistwith Glenn Miller until severalmonths ago when he left to form hisown band.Starting itnmediately after theNorthwestern Basketball game in theField House, the dance will be thefirst in a series of four presented bythe council to take the place of the“C” Dances. A book with three tick¬ets will be issued for one dollar afterthe first dance.New “Rumpus Room”Dancing will be possible in bothrooms with the band set up in onelounge and a public address systemin the other lounge. The game roomsdownstairs will be available and willoffer ping-pong, cards, and games ina newly-labeled “Rumpus room.” Theaffair will close shortly before one.The motif used in decorating thelounges is the traditional “V for Vic¬tory”, fitting in neatly with the planfor benefiting the Red Cross War Re¬lief Fund. As an added feature, bothbasketball teams will be the guestsof the Reynolds Club Council for theduration of'the evening.Vol. 42, No. 47 Z-149I he UoiLu meJwon.THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. FRIDAY. JANUARY 9. 1942Three CentsBdsketeersFace ToughN.U.f Badger SquadsProbable Lineups:CHICAGOVS. NORTHWESTERNNelsonf.ClaaonFonsf.GrahamHeinenc.ClawsonWagenbergg-WendlandOakleyg-KrugerNels Norgren’s proteges face one oftheir toughest week-ends this week.Tomorrow night Northwestern, nowconsidered a leading candidate for thechampionship will invade the ChicagoFieldhouse and on Monday morningat 9:30 the squad will entrain for anengagement the same night with thepresent champions, the WisconsinBadgers, at Madison.Northwestern will shoot a veteranteam at the Maroons. With the ex¬ception of Otto Graham, who had de¬veloped into the team's star, all theWildcat starters participated in thePurple’s 41 to 36 victory over Chicagolast year.Wildcats SurpriseThe Wildcats surprised everyonelast Monday when they handed Min¬nesota, winner of five pre-seasongames, a 49-38 decision. Graham, whohas played every minute of both con¬ference games, led the Purple inscoring with 20 points. According toCoach Lonborg, however, Graham isnot in his full stride as yet.“Otto is not playing half as wellas he can. He is not in good basket¬ball shape yet,” the Wildcat coachNef Sees WorldWar II Hinder¬ing IndustryAlthough it is well known that warshave contributed to the progress ofindustry by stimulating invention, inmost cases warfare has been an effec¬tive drug on industrial development,said Dr. John U. Nef, professor ofeconomic history.Dr. Nef pointed out that some his¬torians have underestimated the in-tluence of war as a destructive factoron industrial advancement.Which Influence?“The historical evidence suggeststhat this side is more important thanthe other,” he said. “But which in¬fluence—the stimulating or the de¬structive—is in the ascendency inconnection with a particular era anda particular country, depends uponthe length of the wars and the natureof the part played by the country inthem.”.4s examples of how wars can stim¬ulate industry in one^^nation and createbottlenecks in another. Dr. Nef dis¬cussed the effect of European wars ofthe sixteenth and early seventeenthcenturies upon the industrial develop¬ment of England and the continentalnations.Postive EffectIn the case of England, he said,where little fighting was done on homesoil, the wars had a positive effect,playing an important role in bringingabout the “industrial revolution” ofthe period.Dr. Nef summarized the four prin¬cipal ways in which these wars pro¬moted the rise of the Industrial revo¬lution as follows:1. “By increasing the demand fornew chemic^ substances such as sul¬phur and saltpetre and particularlyfor products of the subsoil, above allfor metallic ores to be made into iron,steel, copper, brass, and lead objectsof all kinds for protection, and forhurling at the enemy.2. “By encouraging the growth oflarge-scale enterprise, required inextracting and mining the raw ma¬terials of war and manufacturingthem into armaments.(Continued on page four)said, “and he should start making hislong shots soon. Why, Otto can shootbetter than that...”Purple ConfidentThe Purple, of course, are quiteconfident of victory. Only yesterdayThe Daily Northwestern called theMaroons the “conference weak sister.”In attempt to stem the Wildcat’sdrive to the title, Norgren will againstart his team with sophomores hold¬ing down the center and one of theguard spots. Norgren is convincedthat the Chicago quintet is capable of(Continued on page three)TerraquaA Warming Home Warm¬ing^ at 7:30 tonight, sponsor¬ed by the outing club, Terra¬qua, marks the o f f i c i a Iopening of the skating rink,under the North Stands inStagg Field.Although admission is free,there will be an exhibition offigure skating, which will con¬clude by 9:30, to give thespectators an opportunity toattend the Ida Noyes OpenHouse.Hitch-HikingMagician Mys¬tifies CampusThe Kappa Sigmas have housedsome funny things in their day, butnow they have Oscar. Oscar — fullname Oscar Gutheil — is a hitch-hik¬ing magician imported from OhioState U. Here to attend some magi¬cian’s conclave, Gutheil spends hissummers touring the country in oth¬ers’ vehicles, performs amazingsleight-of-hand at various points alongthe way.By-means of these excursions, Gu¬theil t makes his expenses at OhioState, where he is a junior. He sup¬plements his summer roadwork withlocal performances at the Ohio capi¬tal city, whose residents affectionate¬ly refer to him as the “ColumbusWizard.”Covers U.S. in 35 DaysAs a hitch-hiker, Gutheil does well.His first excursion in the summer of’40 covered the forty-eight states,Canada, and Mexico in thirty - fivedays. His present speed record is fromthe' West Coast to Columbus in fourand a half days flat.Accompanying him on his expedi¬tions is a non-descript combination ofsuitcase, scooter, and portable radio.Wheeling it along at his side, it in¬trigues people, he says. In fact, heattributes many of his rides to thedevice, which has “Oscar the Hitch¬hiking Magician” painted on it inlarge luminous letters.Performances UniqueHis performances on these tripshave sometimes been extremely unique.At Yosemite Falls he baffled an audi¬ence of some 6,000 people who weresitting somewhere in the vicinity ofthe bottom of the falls. Later, in oneof the Brown Derby restaurants inLos Angeles, he caused a minor stirby beginning to fish about for hisdinner with a disappearing castingrod.Shortly now, Oscar and scooter de¬vice will depart for home, after firstgiving the Kappa Sigs a sampling ofhis talent. Eventually, he will wind upin the army, he supposes, where heasserts he will be useful in keepingup morale.Twelfth NightTwelfth Night Party will be heldfrom 9:00 to 12:00 at Ida Noyes to¬night. Admission is free.AliensGet ColdShoulderEmbarrassingIncidents AriseMany small, but embarrassing, inci¬dents have occured as a result of therestrictions imposed on enemy aliensin this city. Recently, two Americancitizens, Japanese girls bom in thiscountry, were not permitted to ridethe I.C., as the over-zealous officialconsidered them enemy aliens. Chi¬nese citizens have also been subjectedto minor indignities, and, as a result,are wearing buttons proclaiming theirnationality.Refugee RegulationsThere are 12 Germans, 2 Japanese,and 1 Italian at International House,although the Italian student and themajority of the German students areenemy in name only—they are mostlyJewish refugees who managed to es¬cape from their dictator “liberators.”The refugees are subject to thesame regulations as the Japanese stu¬dents, although their occidental ap¬pearance naturally makes thingseasier if they choose to travel by Illi¬nois Central.Any change of residence must bereported in advance, and permits areissued to anyone who wishes totravel.Telegrams BannedStudents had difficulty in obtainingmoney at first, as all their funds werefrozen; the order has since been re¬voked, and they now have access tothe money they have deposited in thiscountry. Naturally, they are notallowed to communicate with anyonein their homelands, and, in addition,they may send no cables or telegramsin this country.Cameras and radios confiscatedfrom Int House residents are grad¬ually finding their way back to theirowners, as it is well known that thelatter are not going to engage in anyFifth Column activities.HaydonA. Eustace Haydon, profes¬sor of Comparative Religions,will speak in RockefellerChapel Sunday morning, ateleven.Haydon is the author ofseveral philosophical worksincluding “The Question ofthe Ages” and “Man’s Searchfor the Good Life.” One ofChapel Union’s favorite dis¬cussion leaders. ProfessorHaydon is one of the foremostproponents of the HumanisticDoctrine.EnrollmentDrops 4% AtCollegeEnrollment at University College,Dean Clem O. Thompson stated yes¬terday, is only four per cent belowlast quarter. “Everything taken intoconsideration, this is marvelous,” hecommented. “I shouldn’t have beensurprised if it had gone down as muchas fifty per cent.” New registrationsmay still bring the count up, he added.Two new courses are being offeredfor the first time this quarter at thecollege. An education course dealingwith the elementary school, andanother in pharmacology, “presentedwith specific reference to the needsand interests of chemists”, are thetwo additions.Start 170AlbijiTns InAPODriveWith only two days of the twoweek drive gone. Alpha Phi 0-mega*s Defense Stamp Drive hasalready started 170 on stamp al¬bums, chapter president DonPanarese announced yesterday.Each book holds five dollarsworth of stamps when filled, andsome have made initial pur¬chases as high as two dollars.New Booth in CommonsArrangements are now beingmade by the Alpha Phis to openanother booth, probably inHutchinson Commons. The drivewill continue throughout nextweek. ,In addition to help from Wom¬en's Federation, Wyvern haslent the drive aid by furnishingwomen to staff the booths, Pan¬arese said. Those helping out areEileen Clinton, Mary May,Marge Bivens, Yvonne Martin,Mary Lou Landis, Marge Sulli¬van, and Edith Surry. RozannePetrozz, an independent, is alsoworking at the booth.Will Dorothy Lamour Aid?The possibility that DorothyLamour, noiv in Chicago helpingout the Red Cross, could be per¬suaded to trek down to theQuadrangles to give the driveadded publicity, is being con¬sidered as a desirable contin¬gency.Student-FacultyTableS tuden t-Facidty Tablemeets at noo7i today in theprivate dining room of Hutch-inso7i Commons. The facultymembers present will be A. P.Scott of the Humanities De¬partment, Trevino of theSpanish Department, Rossbyof the University's Meteorol¬ogy division, and Adeline D.Link and Zens Smith of thedivision of the Physical Sci¬ences.Student-Faculty Table meet¬ings have been transferredfrom Ida Noyes to the Com¬mons' private dining room, toprovide space for a largerattendance.Episcopals F ormLuncheonGroupAnderson Society, the UniversityEpiscopal student group, will haveluncheon together at a table in theCloister Club Wednesday noons. Epis¬copal students and their friends areinvited to join in the fellowship ofthese meetings together. Prominentguests will often be present as anadded attraction. Inquire at the cash¬ier’s desk for the number of the table.Frosh Bull SessionThe freshmen Bull Session willhold its first meeting of the quar¬ter this afternoon at 3:30 in theW.W.A. room at Ida Noyes.DiscussFate OfMusicalsPossibilityOf MergerThe fate of Mirror and Blackfriarsis being discussed with three or fourpossibilities raised. Dean of StudentsAaron J. Brumbaugh, Assistant Deanof Students William J. Scott, Black-friars Abbot Dale Johnson, and Mir¬ror Director William Randall met yes¬terday but nothing specific was an¬nounced.Separate Shows UnprofitableBoth Dean Scott and Johnson, how¬ever, revealed that some arrangementwill probably be made, with the verydefinite possibility that the two or¬ganizations will merge to put on ashow.Pointing out that the expenses ofneither show could be pared much be¬low $3600, Dean Scott said that itwould probably be unprofitable forboth organizations should they eachput on a show.Other Possibilities“Mirror is attended mainly by thefaculty and the community more thanthe student body in proportion any¬way; while Blackfriars draws wellfrom the alumni,” Dean Scott contin¬ued. “But it is too difficult to predictanything on the basis of the past.”Other possibilities besides the mer¬ger are complete withdrawal of bothorganizations or the abandonment ofBlackfriars and the establishment ofa new organization for the durationof the war.Red Cross GetsProceeds OfCage DanceIn step with present trends, TheReynolds Club Council will present acombined basketball and Winter “C”Dance tomorrow night in both loungesof the club.The proceeds of the dance will goto the benefit of the Red Cross, withadmission price scaling thirty-threecents including tax.Johnny Osborne’s OrchestraBy way of keeping up “the finestring of bands presented at the ‘C’’‘Dances during the past quarter”,mediator Hal Steffe announced thatJohnny Osborne and his orchestrawould play for the inaugural dance.Osborne was a featured saxophonistwith Glenn Miller until severalmonths ago when he left to form hisown band.Starting itnmediately after theNorthwestern Basketball game in theField House, the dance will be thefirst in a series of four presented bythe council to take the place of the“C” Dances. A book with three tick¬ets will be issued for one dollar afterthe first dance.New “Rumpus Room”Dancing will be possible in bothrooms with the band set up in onelounge and a public address systemin the other lounge. The game roomsdownstairs will be available and willoffer ping-pong, cards, and games ina newly-labeled “Rumpus room.” Theaffair will close shortly before one.The motif used in decorating thelounges is the traditional “V for Vic¬tory”, fitting in neatly with the planfor benefiting the Red Cross War Re¬lief Fund. As an added feature, bothbasketball teams will be the guestsof the Reynolds Club Council for theduration of'the evening.Page TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 9. 1942Social Pressure AndThe Athletic ProgramT. Nelson Metcalf, the athletic director, has seriously proposedthat “social pressure” should be used to bring students out forathletics.We are against compulsory athletics at this time. We wouldprobably favor compulsory athletics when America is not at war,but we would never favor using “social pressure” to bring studentsout for athletics or any other extra-curricular activity.We would not support any extensive expansion of the athleticprogram now; the war program is taking enough of the students’time without requiring an additional athletic program. More thana few juniors and seniors who are about to be drafted ought to giveup athletics to take basic military training (which also involvesexercise) and to study harder in order to leave school with a‘degree. Athletics is an extra-curricular activity. Now is the timewhen these activities ought to be de-emphasized. Now is theworst time to attempt to extend an extra-curricular activity byusing “social pressure.” An extended athletic program will com¬pete with vital military training. Before we even consider indirectways of making athletics compulsory, we should make the BasicMilitary Training course compulsory.Better CompulsoryIf athletics was really necessary to everyone at this time,it would be far better to make athletics compulsory than to tryusing social pres.^ure for selling the program. We are completely!dumbfounded to find a supposedly sensible man like Mr. Metcalf iconsidering awarding badges to encourage participation in ath-!letics. If he really imagines such a system will work he is going to ibe tremendously disillusioned. We are thankful that university istudents have enough sense not to pay any attention to any at¬tempts to inveigle them into athletics by using “social pressure.”Silly BadgesIf any social pressure is used w'e think it will be turnedagainst the people who wear silly' badges showing their athleticpowers. As our sports editor pointed out yesterday, the peoplewho do need athletics most will be the last ones to respond to a!“social pressure” program.The students of the university showed an awareness of theneed for physical fitness when they filled the basic military courseto capacity. They decided that a basic military program fitted intopresent needs better than the athletic program. Would Metcalfwant to use social pressure against the students who spend threehours per week taking exercises under the basic military pro¬gram?Realize ResponsibilityThe students of the University realize their responsibilitiesunder the defense program. They do not need any social pressure_to realize these responsibilities. They certainly will not use socialpressure to support a program that may compete with the basicmilitary program.In wartime in particular there is a definite danger that socialpressure can be used to support projects that will boomerangagainst the defense program. In the last war we used social pressureto get every man. into the army though many of them were ofmore value to the nation in other positions. In this war we havethe same dangers. The great difficulty with social pressure is thatanyone can use it. Social pressure cannot only be used to furthergood causes; it can be used by groups who are likely to perhapssubconsciously take advantage of the war emergency to furthertheir own interests.Social Pressure IneffectiveIf any program athletic or otherwise is considered invaluablefor the welfare of the students, then such a program should bemade compulsory. The w’orst policy of all is to rely onsocial pressure to get support for an activity. Social pressure isusually ineffective. It becomes too easily misguided, particularlyin wartime when people are likely to be overemotional.The students of the university are busy enough trying to com¬plete their educations and helping with the defense program. Nowis the worst possible time to promote a program that may inter¬fere with both of these aims. Now is the time to restrict, not topromote the non-essential aspects of university life.J. B.By BOB LAWSONStrangely prolific in the matter ofengagements and marriages has beenvacation and the week previous. Infact, the period has been so prolificthat the fact that Kay Chittenden didnot get married was news. However,for the edification of those who didnot know the reason, it was not a jilt;she and her betrothed had simplyfailed to have banns announced forthe required three times, so the grape¬vine hath it.Lynn Tuttle and Bill Bell made itformal, when he hung his pin theThursday before vacation.Have you noticed ..... .that table 15cWINTERDANCEREYNOLDS CLUB9:30 -12:30John Osborne's Orchestra33cin the CoffeeShop has be¬come the self-appropri-• ated den for asearnest a packof wolves ashave been seenin many a day.The more regu¬lar members include Doc Reed, BobWilson. Fred Kretschmar, and DickReynolds. It’s as much as a girl'saplomb is worth to pass this chummylittle group attired in anything lessrevealing than a huge old-fashionedraccoon coat.Speaking of Bob Wilson, ’tis ru¬mored that he had a fine brawl at hishouse New Year’s Eve, which is along time ago for the Bazaar to men¬tion, but there isn’t anything doingthis week-end, space is long, and, be¬sides, it was a red-hot party.Nick Parisi, . . ....whose name seems strange in aBazaar instead of the sports page dida fine job of explaining to various ofthe girls who were selected on theAll-University football team, an¬nounced in the last Bazaar of lastquarter. Some of the girls were alittle puzzled as to the implicationand asked Nick what the duties oftheir various positions were.He explained to Janet Peacock thatan end must be tall, rangy, and ableto catch passes. Marietta Moore nowkhows that a quarterback must callthe next play. But his best was toPunky Johnson, when he told her thata halfback must be able to run fasterthan the fellows chasing her and mustbe able to “block it out for the boys.”Tlie OoUii THoAooriFOUNDED IN 1902The Daily Maroon is the official studentnewspaper of the University of Chicago, pub¬lished mornings except Saturday, Sunday, andMonday during the Autumn, Winter, andSpring quarters by The Daily Maroon Com¬pany, R881 University Avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:30 phone in stories to our printers.The Chief Printing Company, 148 West 62ndstreet. Telephones: Wentworth 6128 and 6124.The University of Chicago assumes no re¬sponsibility for any statements appearing inThe Daily Maroon, or for any contract enteredinto by 'llie Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves therights of publication of any material appear¬ing in this paper. Subscription rates: $2.75 ayear. $4 by mail. Single copies: three centa.Entered as second class matter March 18,I'.108, at the post office at Chicago, Illinois,under the act of March 8, 1879.MemberPlssocioied GDllG6iatG PressDistributor ofCbllebioie DibeslBOARD OP CONTROLEditorialRICHARD HIMMEL ChairmanJAMES BURTLEROBERT REYNOLDSBusinessEDGAR L. RACHLIN, Business ManagerRichard Bolks, Advertising ManagerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATESRobert Lawson, Nancy I.e8ser. Beats Mueller,Philip RiefT, Chloe Roth, Stuart Schulberg,Shirleo Smith, Marshall Pattullo andElizabeth Jane WatersBUSINESS ASSOCIATESGeorge Flanagan, Howard Kamin, RichardWallens, William Bell,Ellen TuttleEloise Goode's Selection...on that same team caused War¬ren Wilner, her man, to come charg¬ing into the Maroon office, uncertainw'hether to express amusement or topunch me in the nose. I wasn’t here,so I don’t know if he has reached adecision as yet. For his and any otherinterested party's information, I wishto repeat that the selections for thetwo teams was entirely the work ofsome University dashing blades andI had nothing to do with them saveprint them.With the presence of seven Sigmas,the old residents of Blake Hallare upset about their reputation asthe haven of the unorganized or mem¬bers of small clubs. They are begin¬ning to fear that Blake might becomeanother Foster Hall. This would neverdo, for Blake is inhabited by somegirls who would not fit into any such :category, :Scorning clubs andother social organiza¬tions based on anybut clandestine socialactivities, these girlsare now faced by adilemma, becausethey like the clubgirls personally. Itwill be very unfortu¬nate if Blake shouldlose its haphazard way of life. Butsome of the club girls, seeped in thepetty moral judgments of their orgaiyizations, look down their noses at theirfellow residents who blithely set outon dates at midnight or act in otherunpredictable ways, which clubs, jeal¬ously guarding the morals of theirmembers, would never countenance.-It was on similar petty groundsthat one of the -most popular andmost-publicized freshman womenblackballed by all the “big” clubs inthe recent rushing period, which incident left a sour taste in the mouthsof people who heard about it. Merelybecause this girl refused to bow downand cater to the strait-laced conventions demanded by the clubs and pre-ferred to enjoy herself in the com*pany of a fellow whom the dubsdidn’t approve, she was not bid. Thereis also a sophomore girl who is barredfrom membership for the same rea¬sons.Bob Hemingway ......is back after a brief sojourn atthe University of Michigan, whence hebetook himself because of W, H.Auden. When he returned, he broughtthe eminent Doctor Auden with himand took him to a party in Little Bo-hernia. Hemmy also brought a girlfrom Michigan. Dr. Auden had a goodtime, but Hemmy’s girl was a littleshocked at the goings-on.Night Editors: Elizabeth Jane Watersand Charlotte LevitaniKiiunEVtS CaREFUUV EXAmtOClt,Rapid, accurate tens doI^catioa emd repair toeye glosses in our ownshop.We Use Only IBgbeilQuality MatefkdsML HELS R. MESON -■ 138 EAST 6Sss.8Ta,Weitooi'r ^ *■rUeORiOOCOUCCJ,(,n MichiqOK 4vP STAte IBBICHAMPION STEAKS atISBELL’S1435 HYDE PARK BLVD.From International Live Stock ShowSteers — Charcoal broiled over glowingfires, searing and sealing all its naturalflavor.HYDE PARK 3434Free ftARAGI PorkiagPage TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 9. 1942Social Pressure AndThe Athletic ProgramT. Nelson Metcalf, the athletic director, has seriously proposedthat “social pressure” should be used to bring students out forathletics.We are against compulsory athletics at this time. We wouldprobably favor compulsory athletics when America is not at war,but we would never favor using “social pressure” to bring studentsout for athletics or any other extra-curricular activity.We would not support any extensive expansion of the athleticprogram now; the war program is taking enough of the students’time without requiring an additional athletic program. More thana few juniors and seniors who are about to be drafted ought to giveup athletics to take basic military training (which also involvesexercise) and to study harder in order to leave school with a‘degree. Athletics is an extra-curricular activity. Now is the timewhen these activities ought to be de-emphasized. Now is theworst time to attempt to extend an extra-curricular activity byusing “social pressure.” An extended athletic program will com¬pete with vital military training. Before we even consider indirectways of making athletics compulsory, we should make the BasicMilitary Training course compulsory.Better CompulsoryIf athletics was really necessary to everyone at this time,it would be far better to make athletics compulsory than to tryusing social pres.^ure for selling the program. We are completely!dumbfounded to find a supposedly sensible man like Mr. Metcalf iconsidering awarding badges to encourage participation in ath-!letics. If he really imagines such a system will work he is going to ibe tremendously disillusioned. We are thankful that university istudents have enough sense not to pay any attention to any at¬tempts to inveigle them into athletics by using “social pressure.”Silly BadgesIf any social pressure is used w'e think it will be turnedagainst the people who wear silly' badges showing their athleticpowers. As our sports editor pointed out yesterday, the peoplewho do need athletics most will be the last ones to respond to a!“social pressure” program.The students of the university showed an awareness of theneed for physical fitness when they filled the basic military courseto capacity. They decided that a basic military program fitted intopresent needs better than the athletic program. Would Metcalfwant to use social pressure against the students who spend threehours per week taking exercises under the basic military pro¬gram?Realize ResponsibilityThe students of the University realize their responsibilitiesunder the defense program. They do not need any social pressure_to realize these responsibilities. They certainly will not use socialpressure to support a program that may compete with the basicmilitary program.In wartime in particular there is a definite danger that socialpressure can be used to support projects that will boomerangagainst the defense program. In the last war we used social pressureto get every man. into the army though many of them were ofmore value to the nation in other positions. In this war we havethe same dangers. The great difficulty with social pressure is thatanyone can use it. Social pressure cannot only be used to furthergood causes; it can be used by groups who are likely to perhapssubconsciously take advantage of the war emergency to furthertheir own interests.Social Pressure IneffectiveIf any program athletic or otherwise is considered invaluablefor the welfare of the students, then such a program should bemade compulsory. The w’orst policy of all is to rely onsocial pressure to get support for an activity. Social pressure isusually ineffective. It becomes too easily misguided, particularlyin wartime when people are likely to be overemotional.The students of the university are busy enough trying to com¬plete their educations and helping with the defense program. Nowis the worst possible time to promote a program that may inter¬fere with both of these aims. Now is the time to restrict, not topromote the non-essential aspects of university life.J. B.By BOB LAWSONStrangely prolific in the matter ofengagements and marriages has beenvacation and the week previous. Infact, the period has been so prolificthat the fact that Kay Chittenden didnot get married was news. However,for the edification of those who didnot know the reason, it was not a jilt;she and her betrothed had simplyfailed to have banns announced forthe required three times, so the grape¬vine hath it.Lynn Tuttle and Bill Bell made itformal, when he hung his pin theThursday before vacation.Have you noticed ..... .that table 15cWINTERDANCEREYNOLDS CLUB9:30 -12:30John Osborne's Orchestra33cin the CoffeeShop has be¬come the self-appropri-• ated den for asearnest a packof wolves ashave been seenin many a day.The more regu¬lar members include Doc Reed, BobWilson. Fred Kretschmar, and DickReynolds. It’s as much as a girl'saplomb is worth to pass this chummylittle group attired in anything lessrevealing than a huge old-fashionedraccoon coat.Speaking of Bob Wilson, ’tis ru¬mored that he had a fine brawl at hishouse New Year’s Eve, which is along time ago for the Bazaar to men¬tion, but there isn’t anything doingthis week-end, space is long, and, be¬sides, it was a red-hot party.Nick Parisi, . . ....whose name seems strange in aBazaar instead of the sports page dida fine job of explaining to various ofthe girls who were selected on theAll-University football team, an¬nounced in the last Bazaar of lastquarter. Some of the girls were alittle puzzled as to the implicationand asked Nick what the duties oftheir various positions were.He explained to Janet Peacock thatan end must be tall, rangy, and ableto catch passes. Marietta Moore nowkhows that a quarterback must callthe next play. But his best was toPunky Johnson, when he told her thata halfback must be able to run fasterthan the fellows chasing her and mustbe able to “block it out for the boys.”Tlie OoUii THoAooriFOUNDED IN 1902The Daily Maroon is the official studentnewspaper of the University of Chicago, pub¬lished mornings except Saturday, Sunday, andMonday during the Autumn, Winter, andSpring quarters by The Daily Maroon Com¬pany, R881 University Avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:30 phone in stories to our printers.The Chief Printing Company, 148 West 62ndstreet. Telephones: Wentworth 6128 and 6124.The University of Chicago assumes no re¬sponsibility for any statements appearing inThe Daily Maroon, or for any contract enteredinto by 'llie Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves therights of publication of any material appear¬ing in this paper. Subscription rates: $2.75 ayear. $4 by mail. Single copies: three centa.Entered as second class matter March 18,I'.108, at the post office at Chicago, Illinois,under the act of March 8, 1879.MemberPlssocioied GDllG6iatG PressDistributor ofCbllebioie DibeslBOARD OP CONTROLEditorialRICHARD HIMMEL ChairmanJAMES BURTLEROBERT REYNOLDSBusinessEDGAR L. RACHLIN, Business ManagerRichard Bolks, Advertising ManagerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATESRobert Lawson, Nancy I.e8ser. Beats Mueller,Philip RiefT, Chloe Roth, Stuart Schulberg,Shirleo Smith, Marshall Pattullo andElizabeth Jane WatersBUSINESS ASSOCIATESGeorge Flanagan, Howard Kamin, RichardWallens, William Bell,Ellen TuttleEloise Goode's Selection...on that same team caused War¬ren Wilner, her man, to come charg¬ing into the Maroon office, uncertainw'hether to express amusement or topunch me in the nose. I wasn’t here,so I don’t know if he has reached adecision as yet. For his and any otherinterested party's information, I wishto repeat that the selections for thetwo teams was entirely the work ofsome University dashing blades andI had nothing to do with them saveprint them.With the presence of seven Sigmas,the old residents of Blake Hallare upset about their reputation asthe haven of the unorganized or mem¬bers of small clubs. They are begin¬ning to fear that Blake might becomeanother Foster Hall. This would neverdo, for Blake is inhabited by somegirls who would not fit into any such :category, :Scorning clubs andother social organiza¬tions based on anybut clandestine socialactivities, these girlsare now faced by adilemma, becausethey like the clubgirls personally. Itwill be very unfortu¬nate if Blake shouldlose its haphazard way of life. Butsome of the club girls, seeped in thepetty moral judgments of their orgaiyizations, look down their noses at theirfellow residents who blithely set outon dates at midnight or act in otherunpredictable ways, which clubs, jeal¬ously guarding the morals of theirmembers, would never countenance.-It was on similar petty groundsthat one of the -most popular andmost-publicized freshman womenblackballed by all the “big” clubs inthe recent rushing period, which incident left a sour taste in the mouthsof people who heard about it. Merelybecause this girl refused to bow downand cater to the strait-laced conventions demanded by the clubs and pre-ferred to enjoy herself in the com*pany of a fellow whom the dubsdidn’t approve, she was not bid. Thereis also a sophomore girl who is barredfrom membership for the same rea¬sons.Bob Hemingway ......is back after a brief sojourn atthe University of Michigan, whence hebetook himself because of W, H.Auden. When he returned, he broughtthe eminent Doctor Auden with himand took him to a party in Little Bo-hernia. Hemmy also brought a girlfrom Michigan. Dr. Auden had a goodtime, but Hemmy’s girl was a littleshocked at the goings-on.Night Editors: Elizabeth Jane Watersand Charlotte LevitaniKiiunEVtS CaREFUUV EXAmtOClt,Rapid, accurate tens doI^catioa emd repair toeye glosses in our ownshop.We Use Only IBgbeilQuality MatefkdsML HELS R. MESON -■ 138 EAST 6Sss.8Ta,Weitooi'r ^ *■rUeORiOOCOUCCJ,(,n MichiqOK 4vP STAte IBBICHAMPION STEAKS atISBELL’S1435 HYDE PARK BLVD.From International Live Stock ShowSteers — Charcoal broiled over glowingfires, searing and sealing all its naturalflavor.HYDE PARK 3434Free ftARAGI PorkiagTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 9. 1942U_—Swimming TeamMeets mini Next WeekThe University of Chicago swimming team, believed by Coach EdwardMcGillivray to be the strongest in recent years, opens a seven-meet schedule,meeting Illinois, in the Bartlett tank on the Midway Saturday, January 17at 2:30. «The team is headed by Captain Art Bethke, third place winner in theBig Ten meet last year, who leads the breast stroke swimmers. Others inthat bracket are Ken Geppinger, a convert from the basketball team who isa capable man in the water, and Joe Simmler, a sophomore who was amember of Lane Tech’s strong prep team two years ago.r* nrtx AArT^llll\/rA\/ Baugher, who as a sophomoreCfOwCil tVlCKSnIlyray last year was shifted from a competentsprinter to a good distance swimmer, isexpected to take Chicago’s first places inthe 220 to 440. Joe Blakeman, a promis¬ing first-year man, and Baxter Richard¬son, a veteran will back up Baugher.Hank Heinichen, who was state cham¬pion at 100 yards at Lane Tech two yearsago, has passed up all Coach EdwardMcGillivray’s sprinters to lead that divi¬sion. In addition, Bill Leach has joinedthe squad after a year out of attendance.His brother, Lin Leach, was a goodsprinter last year, and the pair will beuseful in the free style relay as well asin the 60 and 100.Paul Jordan, who was admitted toeligibility at the December Conferencemeetings though he is a student in theUniversity’s medical school after com-. . strongest team in years" pletion of his undergraduate studies inthree years, will be the No. 1 back stroker, with Blakeman also on tap in thatbranch of competition.John Crosby, a junior, is Chicago’s best diver. The Maroon schedulefollows:January17Illinois at ChicagoJanuary31Minnesota at MinneapolisFebruary7Iowa at ChicagoFebruary13Milwaukee A.C. at MilwaukeeFebruary14Wisconsin at MadisonFebruary18Northwestern at EvanstonMarch4Purdue at ChicagoMarch 13.14Conference at Ann ArborAh^ Yes! To Be A CoachTake Psych. 201 NowBy BILL LETWIN“Nels Norgren praises spirit of bas¬ketball squad.” Coming from the coachof a team, praise is neither unusualnor exciting. A good coach will, onevery possible occasion, praise someteam. His, the opponent coach’s, oreven one of antiquity. For very clearLet’s start outwith the first case.If his team hasnever won, thecoach has to keepthe players inspirits. How? Pub¬lic h o r n-blowing.In private, chancesare the poor fel¬lows catch hellregularly. In thesecond case, thecoach has a prettysure feeling thatthe next game isin his bag. He hooks the nearest re¬porter and starts raving to him aboutthe enemy team—boy, are they great,are they headed for the league cham¬pionship. Comes next Saturday, histeam wins, and he’s a hero for hav¬ing inspired his boys to the impos-■‘^iblc. He goes down in history as agreat teacher of the fundamentals, a:^parkling between-halves orator, anda devoted friend. And gets a $5000bonus at the end of the season froma group of grateful alumni.Will He Win?The coach who weaves his laurelwreath for Montana’s 1921 five is inan interesting pqsition. He’s not sure,will his team win or won’t they. Ifhis boys win, then they played justlike the Montanans in their prime;if they lose, then their opponentsplayed the same kind of foul, bloodygame that Cliff Institute used in de¬feating Montana in 1922. This mangoes down as a savant of the highestorder, an accomplished historian ofIhe sport, a peerless critic. And so,team or no team, every coach canachieve a reputation by the judicioususe of praise.Admires SpiritOffhand, without any acquaintancewith Coach Norgren, I would judgethat he is sincere in his commenda-Water Polo DroppedFrom Active ListBy WERNER BAUMSwimrring Coach McGillivray an¬nounced yesterday that water polo,in which the University has alwaysbeen strong, has been dropped fromthe schedule.At the recent Western Conferencemeeting in the Hotel Sherman a voteon the retention of the sport washeld. Only three schools, Chicago,Illinois and‘-Michigan were in favorof continuance. Northwestern waswilling to vote favorably if five otherschools did so.Chicago’s team has for years beenone of the strongest in the conference.In 1937, 1938 and 1939, for example,the team won the conference title.Only last year Illinois was seriouslyconsidering the abolition of water polosince: ‘‘Chicago, the only competitionin the neighborhood, is by far too goodfor us.”A Soft SpotMcGillivray has always had a softspot in his heart for the gruelinggame. Only recently, in a speech toa meeting of coaches, he made thefollowing remarks in regards to thesport:‘‘The only weakness in the swim¬ming program is the attention givento team play. Team play has beenproven to be a greater developer ofcharacter, a greater contributor to thesocial traits and qualities that go tomake up the good citizen.‘‘Well here we are—Swimming con¬tributes the most of the entire listof sports and its only weakness istion. I admire the team’s spirit too.In spite of William the Silent, it iseasier to persevere if there is someoccasional success. To keep on fight¬ing after the game is lost, and afterthe last three games were also lost,is one of the great American virtues.It compares only with “Go West,Young Man”, and bubble gum. Ourboys have this bull-dog virtue. “Inhoc signo vinces.”logical reasons.P. . . NelsNorgren. . . Northwestern’s star sophomore forwardstronger offensive ball than it hasshown this year and that it can givethe Wildcats a good scrap, althoughthe chance of a Maroon victory is notbright.According to Norgren, much of theIowa loss of Monday night can beattributed to poor ball handling. Inorder to cure this deficiency, the squadhas been concentrating on it duringthe week’s practice sessions.Twelve On Madison TripOn the trip to Madison, Norgrenwill carry a squad of twelve men.Slated to go are Fons, Nelson, Wagen-berg, Oakley, Heinen, Crosbie, Fogel,Zimmerman, Siska, Lifton, Krakowkaand Husum. These men all workedtogether during the Christmas recess.Wisconsin has dropped its lastthree games after an extensive win¬ning streak. The Badgers should haveone victory to their credit, however,before they meet the Maroons sincethey are scheduled to play Iowa atIowa City tomorrow.Gene Englund, second to JoeStampf, in last year’s scoring race,seems to have been found irreplace¬able. Star of the Cardinal team isJohn Kotz, the outstanding sophomorein the Big Ten last year. Kotz hasproven to be a brilliant shot, asupreme ball handler and a tirelessdefensive man.Page ThreadNorthwestern To InvadeFieldhouse SaturdayOtto GrahamMaroons to playat Madison Monday(Continued from page one)WrestlersOpen UpTomorrowGym TeamIn MeetTonightRead Swedenborg's“DIVINE LOVEAND WISDOM"lOc in paperof University and other _bookstoresThe University of Chicago’s wres¬tling team leaves the Midway tomor¬row for a one-day invasion drivewhich will take in Illinois Normal, atNormal, tomorrow afternoon andBradley Tech, at Peoria, the samenight, opening the 1942 season.The Maroon wrestlers will includeveterans in all weights except the121 and 175-pound brackets. Thesquad is headed by Captain Sam Zaf-ros, a capable 136-pound contender.Coach Spyros Vorres has not se¬lected his 121-pound contestant. Theremaining members of the group in¬clude: Carroll Pyle, a major letter-man at 128 pounds; Zafros; LarryBates, a minor letterman, or DickReynolds, a sophomore, at 145 pounds;Frank Getz, a veteran, or Bud Moran,a sophomore, at 155 pounds; LeonardHumphreville, a 165-pound veteran;Frank Wrobel, a sophomore at 175pounds; and Bob Mustain, experiencedheavyweight contestant.Last year the Maroon team lost toIllinois Normal 19 to 13 on the Mid¬way. Bradley has not been on theschedule since two years ago, whenChicago won 18 to 14.lack of team play. Water polo sup¬plies the team play, plus a lot of ex¬tra development. How, as coachesand physical educators, can we allowsuch an opportunity to pass? Weshould develop water polo and com¬plete our program.”Financial TroubleThe main reason for dropping thesport seems to be the financial ex¬pense involved. Evidently McGillivraycan’t see how it costs more to buybathing suits than baseball uniforms.Quoting again from his report:“More funds! Oh! Well let mequote from “The Score Card” a dailycolumn in the Chicago Daily News.‘Big Ten athletic directors talked atlength during last week’s meetingsof how to enlarge and intensify ourprograms to aid in the national emer¬gency but all of us had about everybranch of sport that could be utilized.’What about water polo in the BigTen?Yesterday’s announcement musthave put a big dent into “Baldy’s”heart.The Maroon gymnasts will opentheir season tonight in a meet withPurdue University to take place inBarelett Gymnasium at 8.Purdue is in the gymnastics com¬petition for the first time in many sea¬sons this year and the Maroons shouldemerge from the meet as victors.Earl and Courtney Shanken willhead the Maroon team. They will besupported by Jim Degan, All Ross,Don Robertson and Stanley Totura.CLASSIFIEDPrivate room and breakfast in return forstaying: nights with children. Near campus.Kann Dor. 7631.Contract Bridge—Classes and duplicate games.Call Plaza 8782 evenings.4 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSEFOR COLLEGE STUDENTS AND GRADUATESA thorough, tnttnsive, stenographic course—starting January 1, April 1, July 1, October 2.Interesting Booklet sent free, without obligation—write or phone. No solicitors employed.moserBUSINESS COLLEGE .PAUL MOSER, J.D«PH.B.Regular Courses for Beginners, open to HighSchool Graduates only, start first Mondayof each month. Advanced Courses startany Monday. Day and Evening. EveningCourses open to men.116 S. Michigan Ava., Chicago, Randolph 4347U. T.1131-1133 E.55th St.COMPLETE SELECTIONOF BEERS ANDOTHER BEVERAGESFREE DELIVERYMID. 0524BLATZ and SIEBENS BEERSHUBHOBNOBBERYCousin Gert says these are cold daysto have to walk to a movie with yourfellah, even arm in arm, even if he's abig fellah with a large comfortable arm.She says to him, I wish I had a big warmovercoat like yours, she says looking athim coy-like. He says to her, this is mynew GGG overcoat I got on sale at theHub, that used to be $75 and was re¬duced to $59.50. I love you, Gert, hesays, but you can't have my overcoat. Ifyou wear it, I go down the street in mynew suit from the Hub that they re¬duced to $39.50, and it looks so goodwe'll never get to the movie on accountof everybody will stop to look at it andwant to fool the goods. That's how goodit is. And my Huberest shoes, that wereon sale at $6.85, I had to wear galoshesto hide them. He looks at her whileshe grabs his arm a little closer to, andshe says, you sure are a swell-lookingfellah all right. And he says, Gert, withthese clothes from the Hub, swell clothesreduced so cheap like this at their bigsale, any fellah can be a swell-lookingfellah, and he grins.So I was talking to Cousin Gert lastnight, and she says she went down tothe Hub to look at their clothes on sale.She says they have swell Lytton suits intweeds and worsteds that are reduced to{ust $39.50, and other suits reduced to$34.50 and a wonderful coat with a liningthat comes out if you want that usedto be $50 and is only $39.50 on sale.? Cousin Gert says what she wants is acoat like that, and when it gets coldshe will put the lining in, and when itgets warm she will take the lining out.And she says she wants a swell tweedsuit like the ones she told me aboutthat are reduced to $34.50 and look likethey cost a lot more. And I says toher. Cousin Gert, maybe you'd look swelllike your fellah in a suit like that anda coat like that, but I don't think yourboss would like it, if you didn't look likea lady when you went to work in themorning. And Gert, she says to me, ifmy boss doesn't like that suit and thatcoat, it won't be because he doesn'tthink I look like a lady, it'll just be be¬cause he wishes he had a suit and a coatlike that himself.the i hubcHeexftef C.jCifttnx {.„n,l JttcLso,,. CH1CAC.OTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 9. 1942U_—Swimming TeamMeets mini Next WeekThe University of Chicago swimming team, believed by Coach EdwardMcGillivray to be the strongest in recent years, opens a seven-meet schedule,meeting Illinois, in the Bartlett tank on the Midway Saturday, January 17at 2:30. «The team is headed by Captain Art Bethke, third place winner in theBig Ten meet last year, who leads the breast stroke swimmers. Others inthat bracket are Ken Geppinger, a convert from the basketball team who isa capable man in the water, and Joe Simmler, a sophomore who was amember of Lane Tech’s strong prep team two years ago.r* nrtx AArT^llll\/rA\/ Baugher, who as a sophomoreCfOwCil tVlCKSnIlyray last year was shifted from a competentsprinter to a good distance swimmer, isexpected to take Chicago’s first places inthe 220 to 440. Joe Blakeman, a promis¬ing first-year man, and Baxter Richard¬son, a veteran will back up Baugher.Hank Heinichen, who was state cham¬pion at 100 yards at Lane Tech two yearsago, has passed up all Coach EdwardMcGillivray’s sprinters to lead that divi¬sion. In addition, Bill Leach has joinedthe squad after a year out of attendance.His brother, Lin Leach, was a goodsprinter last year, and the pair will beuseful in the free style relay as well asin the 60 and 100.Paul Jordan, who was admitted toeligibility at the December Conferencemeetings though he is a student in theUniversity’s medical school after com-. . strongest team in years" pletion of his undergraduate studies inthree years, will be the No. 1 back stroker, with Blakeman also on tap in thatbranch of competition.John Crosby, a junior, is Chicago’s best diver. The Maroon schedulefollows:January17Illinois at ChicagoJanuary31Minnesota at MinneapolisFebruary7Iowa at ChicagoFebruary13Milwaukee A.C. at MilwaukeeFebruary14Wisconsin at MadisonFebruary18Northwestern at EvanstonMarch4Purdue at ChicagoMarch 13.14Conference at Ann ArborAh^ Yes! To Be A CoachTake Psych. 201 NowBy BILL LETWIN“Nels Norgren praises spirit of bas¬ketball squad.” Coming from the coachof a team, praise is neither unusualnor exciting. A good coach will, onevery possible occasion, praise someteam. His, the opponent coach’s, oreven one of antiquity. For very clearLet’s start outwith the first case.If his team hasnever won, thecoach has to keepthe players inspirits. How? Pub¬lic h o r n-blowing.In private, chancesare the poor fel¬lows catch hellregularly. In thesecond case, thecoach has a prettysure feeling thatthe next game isin his bag. He hooks the nearest re¬porter and starts raving to him aboutthe enemy team—boy, are they great,are they headed for the league cham¬pionship. Comes next Saturday, histeam wins, and he’s a hero for hav¬ing inspired his boys to the impos-■‘^iblc. He goes down in history as agreat teacher of the fundamentals, a:^parkling between-halves orator, anda devoted friend. And gets a $5000bonus at the end of the season froma group of grateful alumni.Will He Win?The coach who weaves his laurelwreath for Montana’s 1921 five is inan interesting pqsition. He’s not sure,will his team win or won’t they. Ifhis boys win, then they played justlike the Montanans in their prime;if they lose, then their opponentsplayed the same kind of foul, bloodygame that Cliff Institute used in de¬feating Montana in 1922. This mangoes down as a savant of the highestorder, an accomplished historian ofIhe sport, a peerless critic. And so,team or no team, every coach canachieve a reputation by the judicioususe of praise.Admires SpiritOffhand, without any acquaintancewith Coach Norgren, I would judgethat he is sincere in his commenda-Water Polo DroppedFrom Active ListBy WERNER BAUMSwimrring Coach McGillivray an¬nounced yesterday that water polo,in which the University has alwaysbeen strong, has been dropped fromthe schedule.At the recent Western Conferencemeeting in the Hotel Sherman a voteon the retention of the sport washeld. Only three schools, Chicago,Illinois and‘-Michigan were in favorof continuance. Northwestern waswilling to vote favorably if five otherschools did so.Chicago’s team has for years beenone of the strongest in the conference.In 1937, 1938 and 1939, for example,the team won the conference title.Only last year Illinois was seriouslyconsidering the abolition of water polosince: ‘‘Chicago, the only competitionin the neighborhood, is by far too goodfor us.”A Soft SpotMcGillivray has always had a softspot in his heart for the gruelinggame. Only recently, in a speech toa meeting of coaches, he made thefollowing remarks in regards to thesport:‘‘The only weakness in the swim¬ming program is the attention givento team play. Team play has beenproven to be a greater developer ofcharacter, a greater contributor to thesocial traits and qualities that go tomake up the good citizen.‘‘Well here we are—Swimming con¬tributes the most of the entire listof sports and its only weakness istion. I admire the team’s spirit too.In spite of William the Silent, it iseasier to persevere if there is someoccasional success. To keep on fight¬ing after the game is lost, and afterthe last three games were also lost,is one of the great American virtues.It compares only with “Go West,Young Man”, and bubble gum. Ourboys have this bull-dog virtue. “Inhoc signo vinces.”logical reasons.P. . . NelsNorgren. . . Northwestern’s star sophomore forwardstronger offensive ball than it hasshown this year and that it can givethe Wildcats a good scrap, althoughthe chance of a Maroon victory is notbright.According to Norgren, much of theIowa loss of Monday night can beattributed to poor ball handling. Inorder to cure this deficiency, the squadhas been concentrating on it duringthe week’s practice sessions.Twelve On Madison TripOn the trip to Madison, Norgrenwill carry a squad of twelve men.Slated to go are Fons, Nelson, Wagen-berg, Oakley, Heinen, Crosbie, Fogel,Zimmerman, Siska, Lifton, Krakowkaand Husum. These men all workedtogether during the Christmas recess.Wisconsin has dropped its lastthree games after an extensive win¬ning streak. The Badgers should haveone victory to their credit, however,before they meet the Maroons sincethey are scheduled to play Iowa atIowa City tomorrow.Gene Englund, second to JoeStampf, in last year’s scoring race,seems to have been found irreplace¬able. Star of the Cardinal team isJohn Kotz, the outstanding sophomorein the Big Ten last year. Kotz hasproven to be a brilliant shot, asupreme ball handler and a tirelessdefensive man.Page ThreadNorthwestern To InvadeFieldhouse SaturdayOtto GrahamMaroons to playat Madison Monday(Continued from page one)WrestlersOpen UpTomorrowGym TeamIn MeetTonightRead Swedenborg's“DIVINE LOVEAND WISDOM"lOc in paperof University and other _bookstoresThe University of Chicago’s wres¬tling team leaves the Midway tomor¬row for a one-day invasion drivewhich will take in Illinois Normal, atNormal, tomorrow afternoon andBradley Tech, at Peoria, the samenight, opening the 1942 season.The Maroon wrestlers will includeveterans in all weights except the121 and 175-pound brackets. Thesquad is headed by Captain Sam Zaf-ros, a capable 136-pound contender.Coach Spyros Vorres has not se¬lected his 121-pound contestant. Theremaining members of the group in¬clude: Carroll Pyle, a major letter-man at 128 pounds; Zafros; LarryBates, a minor letterman, or DickReynolds, a sophomore, at 145 pounds;Frank Getz, a veteran, or Bud Moran,a sophomore, at 155 pounds; LeonardHumphreville, a 165-pound veteran;Frank Wrobel, a sophomore at 175pounds; and Bob Mustain, experiencedheavyweight contestant.Last year the Maroon team lost toIllinois Normal 19 to 13 on the Mid¬way. Bradley has not been on theschedule since two years ago, whenChicago won 18 to 14.lack of team play. Water polo sup¬plies the team play, plus a lot of ex¬tra development. How, as coachesand physical educators, can we allowsuch an opportunity to pass? Weshould develop water polo and com¬plete our program.”Financial TroubleThe main reason for dropping thesport seems to be the financial ex¬pense involved. Evidently McGillivraycan’t see how it costs more to buybathing suits than baseball uniforms.Quoting again from his report:“More funds! Oh! Well let mequote from “The Score Card” a dailycolumn in the Chicago Daily News.‘Big Ten athletic directors talked atlength during last week’s meetingsof how to enlarge and intensify ourprograms to aid in the national emer¬gency but all of us had about everybranch of sport that could be utilized.’What about water polo in the BigTen?Yesterday’s announcement musthave put a big dent into “Baldy’s”heart.The Maroon gymnasts will opentheir season tonight in a meet withPurdue University to take place inBarelett Gymnasium at 8.Purdue is in the gymnastics com¬petition for the first time in many sea¬sons this year and the Maroons shouldemerge from the meet as victors.Earl and Courtney Shanken willhead the Maroon team. They will besupported by Jim Degan, All Ross,Don Robertson and Stanley Totura.CLASSIFIEDPrivate room and breakfast in return forstaying: nights with children. Near campus.Kann Dor. 7631.Contract Bridge—Classes and duplicate games.Call Plaza 8782 evenings.4 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSEFOR COLLEGE STUDENTS AND GRADUATESA thorough, tnttnsive, stenographic course—starting January 1, April 1, July 1, October 2.Interesting Booklet sent free, without obligation—write or phone. No solicitors employed.moserBUSINESS COLLEGE .PAUL MOSER, J.D«PH.B.Regular Courses for Beginners, open to HighSchool Graduates only, start first Mondayof each month. Advanced Courses startany Monday. Day and Evening. EveningCourses open to men.116 S. Michigan Ava., Chicago, Randolph 4347U. T.1131-1133 E.55th St.COMPLETE SELECTIONOF BEERS ANDOTHER BEVERAGESFREE DELIVERYMID. 0524BLATZ and SIEBENS BEERSHUBHOBNOBBERYCousin Gert says these are cold daysto have to walk to a movie with yourfellah, even arm in arm, even if he's abig fellah with a large comfortable arm.She says to him, I wish I had a big warmovercoat like yours, she says looking athim coy-like. He says to her, this is mynew GGG overcoat I got on sale at theHub, that used to be $75 and was re¬duced to $59.50. I love you, Gert, hesays, but you can't have my overcoat. Ifyou wear it, I go down the street in mynew suit from the Hub that they re¬duced to $39.50, and it looks so goodwe'll never get to the movie on accountof everybody will stop to look at it andwant to fool the goods. That's how goodit is. And my Huberest shoes, that wereon sale at $6.85, I had to wear galoshesto hide them. He looks at her whileshe grabs his arm a little closer to, andshe says, you sure are a swell-lookingfellah all right. And he says, Gert, withthese clothes from the Hub, swell clothesreduced so cheap like this at their bigsale, any fellah can be a swell-lookingfellah, and he grins.So I was talking to Cousin Gert lastnight, and she says she went down tothe Hub to look at their clothes on sale.She says they have swell Lytton suits intweeds and worsteds that are reduced to{ust $39.50, and other suits reduced to$34.50 and a wonderful coat with a liningthat comes out if you want that usedto be $50 and is only $39.50 on sale.? Cousin Gert says what she wants is acoat like that, and when it gets coldshe will put the lining in, and when itgets warm she will take the lining out.And she says she wants a swell tweedsuit like the ones she told me aboutthat are reduced to $34.50 and look likethey cost a lot more. And I says toher. Cousin Gert, maybe you'd look swelllike your fellah in a suit like that anda coat like that, but I don't think yourboss would like it, if you didn't look likea lady when you went to work in themorning. And Gert, she says to me, ifmy boss doesn't like that suit and thatcoat, it won't be because he doesn'tthink I look like a lady, it'll just be be¬cause he wishes he had a suit and a coatlike that himself.the i hubcHeexftef C.jCifttnx {.„n,l JttcLso,,. CH1CAC.OPage FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY, JANUARY 9. 1942Cross-Country; t. *By JOAN WEHLENCurriculum changes and introduc¬tion of many new courses by Amer¬ican universities and colleges has fol¬lowed almost immediately on theUnited States’ entry into the war.Most schools began the new year withannouncements of extensions in theirprograms to allow students to com¬plete the regular four year course inthree years by improving summercourses, and offering more or them.Some are also extending the num¬ber of courses that a student is al¬lowed to take at one time. The resultof this will be to free a larger num¬ber of men for service in the armedforces and to enable these men tocomplete their education before theyenter the service. Medical and tech¬nical courses have been those whichare given special acceleration.In addition to these changes in theregular curriculum, many schoolshave introduced civilian trainingcourses similar to the one offered atthis University. The courses are plan¬ned to give the student some pre¬military training and to enable himto be ready to help in civilian de¬fense.Red Cross units have been startedat almost all colleges, and DePaulUniversity reports a 100 per cent en¬rollment among its young women.Pilot training courses are offered atsome universities, and science de¬partments all over the country areassisting the national defense effort.Some of the specific contributionsof various schools to the war effortare as follows:Indiana University: Introduction ofyear round program to be followedby graduation in three years. Ex¬tension of credits to men who aredrafted before completing the semes¬ter they are embarked upon.Hanover College: Aviation classesare offered to upper classmen, andgraduation will be made possible inthree years.University of Iowa: Civilian train¬ing courses are being given andcourses are being shortened.Drake University: The four yearTourse has been shortened to twoyears, seven months, so that freshmenentering in February of this year willbe able to graduate in August 1944.' Cornell University: A year roundcourse is being offered, enabling stu¬dents to finish in three years. Civilianpilot training is also being offered.University of Minnesota: Specialengineering courses are offered, aswell as army and navy ROTC courses.Graduation has been possible in threeyears at Minnesota for a number ofyears.University of Illinois: Preparationshave been made to train officers inthe University and to house them onthe campus. ROTC and civilian avi¬ation are offered.Iowa State University: As a resultof speed-ups begun last year in viewof the emergency, many students havealready been graduated ahead of time.Defense courses in engineering andcivilian training are being given.Works WritesOn 2 YearB.A. DegreeAdoption of a plan to grant abachelor’s degree at the end of twoyears would help clarify relationshipsexisting at present among the vari-gated types of institutions on thehigher educational level, assertedProfessor of Education George A.Works in a recent article written for“Current Issues in Higher Education”.Viewed from the point of fitting thetwo year degree into the generaleducation of the student. Worksclaims that the logical place to grantsuch a degree is at the end of thejunior college stage.He believes that there is sufficientevidence at hand to indicate that thejunior college is here to stay, andthat as such would find its place as ameans of preparing the student forhis advanced work leading to a higherdegree.The present situation regardingthe Master’s degree. Works feels, isunsatisfactory due to the fact that itrepresents only one year of work be¬yond the Bachelor’s, too short a pe-AreYouGoingToSKULL ANDCRESCENT'SCORSAGELESSFORMAL?THE ORCHESTRA-HARVEY KLYDETHE TIME-FRIDAY, JAN. 23,1942-9:30 to 1:00THE PLACE - CLOISTER CLUB, IDA NOYESTHE PRICE THE BID-$2.00 TAX INCLUDEDI'M GOINGMurrow Puts In OnlyChic^o AppearanceNef Sees WorldWar 11 Hinder¬ing Industry(Continued from page one)3. “By making the sovereign au¬thority dependent upon rich men—likethe Fuggers in the early sixteenthcentury—for loans of money neededto finance the wars.4. “By the technical discoveries,made in response to war, which havecontributed to the reductions in thelabor costs of production in many in¬dustries.”Destructive On ContinentHeard on the trans-Atlantic airchannels nearly every day for morethan two years, Edward R. Murrow,Chief of the CBS European Staff, willgive a person to person talk, Friday,January 16. The talk “England andAmerica in the First Year of War”,is being given under the auspices ofThe Association for Family Livingin Orchestra Hall at 8:30 P.M. Thiswill be Murrow’s first and only ap¬pearance in Chicago and vicinity sincehis return from Europe.row has traveled the length anbreadth of England, interviewinmen and women of all classes, on thstreets of London, on the Dover Coastin the hills of Scotland, in the Weismining country.Tickets can be obtained from thInformation Desk in the Press Building or from Marjorie Eckhouse oBarbara Deutsch. Reserved seats ar$1.00, $1.60, and $2.00, plus tax. Gallery seats are unreserved and the cosis 50c, plus tax.On the continent, however. Dr. Nefpointed out, where intense fightingoccurred, the destructive effect of warfar outweighed its positive role. Itwas in Northern Italy, the SpanishNetherlands. Germany, and centralEurope that the greatest harm wasdone, he said.In addition to the direct destructionof industry by fighting in the indus¬trial towns, in which troops set fireto factories and pilfered warehouses,there were even more serious indirectconsequences, he said. Chief of thesewere the serious losses in trade out¬lets, markets for which were quicklycaptured by the rapidly expandingindustries of England.However, Dr. Nef made clear, thecontinental warfare was only one ofriod in which to develop a thoroughbackground.Another criticism of the presentsystem which he believes might beoffset is that students at present aredetained too long at college and notallowed to assume their places outsideat an earlier date.Edward Murrow, now but 37 yearsold, is to be credited with the fieldorganization of one of today’s greatnews services. Before he joined thestaff of the Columbia BroadcastingSystem in 1935, and after his gradu¬ation from Washington State College,he had been President of the NationalStudent Federation and Assistant Di¬rector of the Institute of InternationalEducation.Since 1937, Mr. Murrow has beenin Europe covering such events priorto the war as the Austrian Anschlussand the fateful Munich Conference,and he was heard in the first broad¬cast ever made from the MaginotLine. All through the hostilities, Mur-many factors in causing the rapid de¬velopment of British industry.“Natural resources and geographi¬cal conditions, historical traditions,monetary, religious, constitutionaland intellectual history all contributedto bring about the early industrialrevolution,” he said.Invite WomenTo OrganizeIdaNoyesLeagueAny group, organization, or individual interested in women’s intramurabasketball should report to Ida NoyeiOffice. Team entries, with informatiotconcerning captain’s name and address, colors to be worn, and firstsecond, and third choices of times tcplay, should be made before Januarj16th.Individuals who wish to be placedon a team should report before tht14th to Miss Burns or Miss Bourmbetween 3:30 and 5 on Monday andWednesday afternoons and 7 and 9:3(]on Tuesday and Thursdays eveningsthe regrular hours for practice andgames. Practice at these hours hasalready begun.YOU CAN'T BEAT FUN. . . And There's Loads of it Here EveryFRIDAYCOLLEGE NIGHTNowHAROLD STOKESand. his new orchestra that you'll agree is tops for 1942THE KING'S JESTERSand their Queen, Mar jory WhitneyREDHUTSON"The Music Goes 'Round and 'Round"BERRY SISTERSHAL BEHANDOROTHY DORBEN DANCERSand a newCOLLEGE SHOWEvery Night—Prizes and SurprisesUs* your special Students Courtesy Card tor reduced price ad¬mission. If you haven't one, get it at th* Daily Maroon Office.Page FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY, JANUARY 9. 1942Cross-Country; t. *By JOAN WEHLENCurriculum changes and introduc¬tion of many new courses by Amer¬ican universities and colleges has fol¬lowed almost immediately on theUnited States’ entry into the war.Most schools began the new year withannouncements of extensions in theirprograms to allow students to com¬plete the regular four year course inthree years by improving summercourses, and offering more or them.Some are also extending the num¬ber of courses that a student is al¬lowed to take at one time. The resultof this will be to free a larger num¬ber of men for service in the armedforces and to enable these men tocomplete their education before theyenter the service. Medical and tech¬nical courses have been those whichare given special acceleration.In addition to these changes in theregular curriculum, many schoolshave introduced civilian trainingcourses similar to the one offered atthis University. The courses are plan¬ned to give the student some pre¬military training and to enable himto be ready to help in civilian de¬fense.Red Cross units have been startedat almost all colleges, and DePaulUniversity reports a 100 per cent en¬rollment among its young women.Pilot training courses are offered atsome universities, and science de¬partments all over the country areassisting the national defense effort.Some of the specific contributionsof various schools to the war effortare as follows:Indiana University: Introduction ofyear round program to be followedby graduation in three years. Ex¬tension of credits to men who aredrafted before completing the semes¬ter they are embarked upon.Hanover College: Aviation classesare offered to upper classmen, andgraduation will be made possible inthree years.University of Iowa: Civilian train¬ing courses are being given andcourses are being shortened.Drake University: The four yearTourse has been shortened to twoyears, seven months, so that freshmenentering in February of this year willbe able to graduate in August 1944.' Cornell University: A year roundcourse is being offered, enabling stu¬dents to finish in three years. Civilianpilot training is also being offered.University of Minnesota: Specialengineering courses are offered, aswell as army and navy ROTC courses.Graduation has been possible in threeyears at Minnesota for a number ofyears.University of Illinois: Preparationshave been made to train officers inthe University and to house them onthe campus. ROTC and civilian avi¬ation are offered.Iowa State University: As a resultof speed-ups begun last year in viewof the emergency, many students havealready been graduated ahead of time.Defense courses in engineering andcivilian training are being given.Works WritesOn 2 YearB.A. DegreeAdoption of a plan to grant abachelor’s degree at the end of twoyears would help clarify relationshipsexisting at present among the vari-gated types of institutions on thehigher educational level, assertedProfessor of Education George A.Works in a recent article written for“Current Issues in Higher Education”.Viewed from the point of fitting thetwo year degree into the generaleducation of the student. Worksclaims that the logical place to grantsuch a degree is at the end of thejunior college stage.He believes that there is sufficientevidence at hand to indicate that thejunior college is here to stay, andthat as such would find its place as ameans of preparing the student forhis advanced work leading to a higherdegree.The present situation regardingthe Master’s degree. Works feels, isunsatisfactory due to the fact that itrepresents only one year of work be¬yond the Bachelor’s, too short a pe-AreYouGoingToSKULL ANDCRESCENT'SCORSAGELESSFORMAL?THE ORCHESTRA-HARVEY KLYDETHE TIME-FRIDAY, JAN. 23,1942-9:30 to 1:00THE PLACE - CLOISTER CLUB, IDA NOYESTHE PRICE THE BID-$2.00 TAX INCLUDEDI'M GOINGMurrow Puts In OnlyChic^o AppearanceNef Sees WorldWar 11 Hinder¬ing Industry(Continued from page one)3. “By making the sovereign au¬thority dependent upon rich men—likethe Fuggers in the early sixteenthcentury—for loans of money neededto finance the wars.4. “By the technical discoveries,made in response to war, which havecontributed to the reductions in thelabor costs of production in many in¬dustries.”Destructive On ContinentHeard on the trans-Atlantic airchannels nearly every day for morethan two years, Edward R. Murrow,Chief of the CBS European Staff, willgive a person to person talk, Friday,January 16. The talk “England andAmerica in the First Year of War”,is being given under the auspices ofThe Association for Family Livingin Orchestra Hall at 8:30 P.M. Thiswill be Murrow’s first and only ap¬pearance in Chicago and vicinity sincehis return from Europe.row has traveled the length anbreadth of England, interviewinmen and women of all classes, on thstreets of London, on the Dover Coastin the hills of Scotland, in the Weismining country.Tickets can be obtained from thInformation Desk in the Press Building or from Marjorie Eckhouse oBarbara Deutsch. Reserved seats ar$1.00, $1.60, and $2.00, plus tax. Gallery seats are unreserved and the cosis 50c, plus tax.On the continent, however. Dr. Nefpointed out, where intense fightingoccurred, the destructive effect of warfar outweighed its positive role. Itwas in Northern Italy, the SpanishNetherlands. Germany, and centralEurope that the greatest harm wasdone, he said.In addition to the direct destructionof industry by fighting in the indus¬trial towns, in which troops set fireto factories and pilfered warehouses,there were even more serious indirectconsequences, he said. Chief of thesewere the serious losses in trade out¬lets, markets for which were quicklycaptured by the rapidly expandingindustries of England.However, Dr. Nef made clear, thecontinental warfare was only one ofriod in which to develop a thoroughbackground.Another criticism of the presentsystem which he believes might beoffset is that students at present aredetained too long at college and notallowed to assume their places outsideat an earlier date.Edward Murrow, now but 37 yearsold, is to be credited with the fieldorganization of one of today’s greatnews services. Before he joined thestaff of the Columbia BroadcastingSystem in 1935, and after his gradu¬ation from Washington State College,he had been President of the NationalStudent Federation and Assistant Di¬rector of the Institute of InternationalEducation.Since 1937, Mr. Murrow has beenin Europe covering such events priorto the war as the Austrian Anschlussand the fateful Munich Conference,and he was heard in the first broad¬cast ever made from the MaginotLine. All through the hostilities, Mur-many factors in causing the rapid de¬velopment of British industry.“Natural resources and geographi¬cal conditions, historical traditions,monetary, religious, constitutionaland intellectual history all contributedto bring about the early industrialrevolution,” he said.Invite WomenTo OrganizeIdaNoyesLeagueAny group, organization, or individual interested in women’s intramurabasketball should report to Ida NoyeiOffice. Team entries, with informatiotconcerning captain’s name and address, colors to be worn, and firstsecond, and third choices of times tcplay, should be made before Januarj16th.Individuals who wish to be placedon a team should report before tht14th to Miss Burns or Miss Bourmbetween 3:30 and 5 on Monday andWednesday afternoons and 7 and 9:3(]on Tuesday and Thursdays eveningsthe regrular hours for practice andgames. Practice at these hours hasalready begun.YOU CAN'T BEAT FUN. . . And There's Loads of it Here EveryFRIDAYCOLLEGE NIGHTNowHAROLD STOKESand. his new orchestra that you'll agree is tops for 1942THE KING'S JESTERSand their Queen, Mar jory WhitneyREDHUTSON"The Music Goes 'Round and 'Round"BERRY SISTERSHAL BEHANDOROTHY DORBEN DANCERSand a newCOLLEGE SHOWEvery Night—Prizes and SurprisesUs* your special Students Courtesy Card tor reduced price ad¬mission. If you haven't one, get it at th* Daily Maroon Office.lomat Turns ColUfC Prol«stor — Dr. Johnnyi, who was Hungarian Minister to the Unitedn until the Nazis took over his country, is shownwith two of his students at Dartmouth College,re he teaches a popular national defense courselower politics.Qu%%n ol Spoiltr Royal Highness. Miss Elaint McKte, St.ersburg (Florida) Junior Coikgc co-ed, waschoice of St. Ptttrsbuf9*s clubs as ruler ofrts for the current season. She was chosenn a bevy of 40 "pretenden to the throne"te annual Orange Ball. Queen Elaine is 19,chestnut brown hair, clear blue eyes, andghs 115 pounds.>nty Pledges Frolic in Sigma Chi Derby — Sally Rainer, Delta Delta Delta pledge at University of Ala-*. jumps into the lead in a steeplechase race in which the girls had to run over auto . ib through boxes. This annual event is climaxed with the selection of the Sweetheart of Sigma C-hi girl. More2000 students witnessed the ceremonies. D's*" ^Demonstrating His Superb Form, Ed Motter, (topman) who six years ago lost Kis vision, today amazesauthorities who believed his athletic feats impossiblewithout sight. His brother, Justin (bottom), taught Edthe tricks. The sightless athlete, a letterman of the U. C.L. A. gym team, actively participates in intercollegiatemeets.\lomat Turns ColUfC Prol«stor — Dr. Johnnyi, who was Hungarian Minister to the Unitedn until the Nazis took over his country, is shownwith two of his students at Dartmouth College,re he teaches a popular national defense courselower politics.Qu%%n ol Spoiltr Royal Highness. Miss Elaint McKte, St.ersburg (Florida) Junior Coikgc co-ed, waschoice of St. Ptttrsbuf9*s clubs as ruler ofrts for the current season. She was chosenn a bevy of 40 "pretenden to the throne"te annual Orange Ball. Queen Elaine is 19,chestnut brown hair, clear blue eyes, andghs 115 pounds.>nty Pledges Frolic in Sigma Chi Derby — Sally Rainer, Delta Delta Delta pledge at University of Ala-*. jumps into the lead in a steeplechase race in which the girls had to run over auto . ib through boxes. This annual event is climaxed with the selection of the Sweetheart of Sigma C-hi girl. More2000 students witnessed the ceremonies. D's*" ^Demonstrating His Superb Form, Ed Motter, (topman) who six years ago lost Kis vision, today amazesauthorities who believed his athletic feats impossiblewithout sight. His brother, Justin (bottom), taught Edthe tricks. The sightless athlete, a letterman of the U. C.L. A. gym team, actively participates in intercollegiatemeets.\It*s Fun and WorkWaiting OnEvery day most of the 200 mem¬bers of Williams College's Gar-Field Club file into the dininsroom for their meals. To servethem durins twenty-five minutelunch and forty-five minute din¬ner periods requires planning,assembly-line methods — and astaff of competent, well trainedwaiters. Mostly scholarship men,the waiters have developed atechnique and jargon that wouldput a jitterbug to shame. For thepart it's fun, but these peeves doirk the "cod-carriers": slow eatersat lunch; iced tea (because ofthe extra work); the task of dis¬tributing butter pats to all tables;and Sunday morning breakfastduty.i'r-iCoMcsidtc Discst Photos by Rendell^ Making a "set-up". After the food is prepared waitersf begin to filter in and start their "set-ups". Don Moore isone of the early arrivals. After all tables are ready, membersare summoned by a gong, and the cooks dish out the food2 On this meal waiters eat afterward, and so Sam Hunter is hunHe tries to snitch a dessert, but fails to elude the watchful eyejthe pastry cook. He'll just have to starve for a while.L3 "The File". The headwaiter returns from the dining hall and calls off the names of tablesempty of guests. Then waiters file into the hall with their heavy trays.r--<.<e A. ^ ^ J' would P-ei«5 "The Major Snatch". Speedy procedure is illustrated as the dishwasherempties the tray of Fred Bergfors. "Snatch" is the term applied to clearingthe table of dishes. The "major" takes care of the eating dishes, "minor" theserving platters.6 Kitchen crew. One of the student kitchenmechanic jobs is that of glasswashe'r. BillHenderson fills the post.“7 Milt Frigoff sulks as he "takes a deff/ — clearing away the coffe®'and saucers out in the lower club loun'Bane of the waiters, this job is used to peiiie those who infringe waiters ruleswHIt*s Fun and WorkWaiting OnEvery day most of the 200 mem¬bers of Williams College's Gar-Field Club file into the dininsroom for their meals. To servethem durins twenty-five minutelunch and forty-five minute din¬ner periods requires planning,assembly-line methods — and astaff of competent, well trainedwaiters. Mostly scholarship men,the waiters have developed atechnique and jargon that wouldput a jitterbug to shame. For thepart it's fun, but these peeves doirk the "cod-carriers": slow eatersat lunch; iced tea (because ofthe extra work); the task of dis¬tributing butter pats to all tables;and Sunday morning breakfastduty.i'r-iCoMcsidtc Discst Photos by Rendell^ Making a "set-up". After the food is prepared waitersf begin to filter in and start their "set-ups". Don Moore isone of the early arrivals. After all tables are ready, membersare summoned by a gong, and the cooks dish out the food2 On this meal waiters eat afterward, and so Sam Hunter is hunHe tries to snitch a dessert, but fails to elude the watchful eyejthe pastry cook. He'll just have to starve for a while.L3 "The File". The headwaiter returns from the dining hall and calls off the names of tablesempty of guests. Then waiters file into the hall with their heavy trays.r--<.<e A. ^ ^ J' would P-ei«5 "The Major Snatch". Speedy procedure is illustrated as the dishwasherempties the tray of Fred Bergfors. "Snatch" is the term applied to clearingthe table of dishes. The "major" takes care of the eating dishes, "minor" theserving platters.6 Kitchen crew. One of the student kitchenmechanic jobs is that of glasswashe'r. BillHenderson fills the post.“7 Milt Frigoff sulks as he "takes a deff/ — clearing away the coffe®'and saucers out in the lower club loun'Bane of the waiters, this job is used to peiiie those who infringe waiters ruleswHGood Toficl — Dorothy Bryant,^-year-old freshman in Texas Christianas been named "Sweetheart” of theI Band. She thinks collese men areis majorins in physical education.Not JutI an Ordinary Gama is this but four presidents of the fourclasses at Illinois State Normal University (Bloominston, III.) were en¬joying a bit of bridge in the student lounqe when the photographer caughtthem. It’s been five years since a woman has held a class presidency on tneISNU campus although there are two girls to every man at Normal.Dcfanta Coordinator at Radcliffe Collegeis Elizabeth Sturdevant who heads a committeewhich correlates all defense activities at the col¬lege. She is also secretary of the Student Gov¬ernment Association this year. Acmethan the average of the 4 otherrgest-seiling cigarettes tested...less thanfE SMOKE'S THE THIN,MELS ALWAYS TASTE GREAT. ANDHAT EXTRA MILDNESS MEANSA LOT TO ME, NATURALL/rhe smoke of slower-burningCamels contains28%LESSIICOTINEly of them...according to independentscientific tests of the smoke itself!RALPH FLANAGAN-— He SwamWorld*s Fastest MileTobacct) Company. Winston-Salem. N.C.Good Toficl — Dorothy Bryant,^-year-old freshman in Texas Christianas been named "Sweetheart” of theI Band. She thinks collese men areis majorins in physical education.Not JutI an Ordinary Gama is this but four presidents of the fourclasses at Illinois State Normal University (Bloominston, III.) were en¬joying a bit of bridge in the student lounqe when the photographer caughtthem. It’s been five years since a woman has held a class presidency on tneISNU campus although there are two girls to every man at Normal.Dcfanta Coordinator at Radcliffe Collegeis Elizabeth Sturdevant who heads a committeewhich correlates all defense activities at the col¬lege. She is also secretary of the Student Gov¬ernment Association this year. Acmethan the average of the 4 otherrgest-seiling cigarettes tested...less thanfE SMOKE'S THE THIN,MELS ALWAYS TASTE GREAT. ANDHAT EXTRA MILDNESS MEANSA LOT TO ME, NATURALL/rhe smoke of slower-burningCamels contains28%LESSIICOTINEly of them...according to independentscientific tests of the smoke itself!RALPH FLANAGAN-— He SwamWorld*s Fastest MileTobacct) Company. Winston-Salem. N.C.5$** Cook Up Novel Stunt —forges in the mechanical engineering shops atliege were put to novel use recently when student members of the American Sc-lineers used them for cooking hamburgers at,a "buffet".supper in honor of senior. Here are the chefs. From left: I. J. Hetherington, N. K. Lee, E. T. Light, R. B.G. P. McKay (kneeling), and I. L. Linten. The supper was served on the spot.Colle9.i«t« Discst Photo bv UpchurchBurning Up the Mortgage — Alabama College, Montevallo, Ala., had a $183,000fire recently — but this time it was good news. Here Business Manager E. H. Wills, Execu¬tive Secretary Shelby Southard, and Pres. A. F. Harman are shown officially burning nearlya quarter of a million dollars worth of building bonds which the college retired.~ aiti‘ •t|ljUniversity Installs World's Quitest Room — Even rubber mountings are used forthe 100,000-pound room being built at Northwestern University to eliminate all noiseand vibration for scientific studies. Professors claim it will be as silent as cosmic space.Walls are of six-inch concrete.InseparableTwins Flora and Dorothy Kimball of thehave been elected treasurer and secretaconsecutive year. They are now juniorsXi Delta sorority and both are enrolled i5$** Cook Up Novel Stunt —forges in the mechanical engineering shops atliege were put to novel use recently when student members of the American Sc-lineers used them for cooking hamburgers at,a "buffet".supper in honor of senior. Here are the chefs. From left: I. J. Hetherington, N. K. Lee, E. T. Light, R. B.G. P. McKay (kneeling), and I. L. Linten. The supper was served on the spot.Colle9.i«t« Discst Photo bv UpchurchBurning Up the Mortgage — Alabama College, Montevallo, Ala., had a $183,000fire recently — but this time it was good news. Here Business Manager E. H. Wills, Execu¬tive Secretary Shelby Southard, and Pres. A. F. Harman are shown officially burning nearlya quarter of a million dollars worth of building bonds which the college retired.~ aiti‘ •t|ljUniversity Installs World's Quitest Room — Even rubber mountings are used forthe 100,000-pound room being built at Northwestern University to eliminate all noiseand vibration for scientific studies. Professors claim it will be as silent as cosmic space.Walls are of six-inch concrete.InseparableTwins Flora and Dorothy Kimball of thehave been elected treasurer and secretaconsecutive year. They are now juniorsXi Delta sorority and both are enrolled iimpshiretile third»i Alpharal Arts.Regains Sight — Bernard M. Keilmurray,freshman adviser at Yale University, marvelsat the changes of the past five years as, mirac¬ulously, his sisht comes bach followins fiveyears of total blindness. He could not ex¬plain the miracle, neither could physicians.Dunking Freshmen by Long Distance — Campus Day at Reed College, Portland, Ore., finds students andfaculty abandoning the classroom for the lawn, lake, and canyon. Highlight is the Frosh-Soph tug of war over thelake. The freshmen lost this year and the picture tells why by the grim look on the faces of the sophomore“tuggers" Collesutc Disrst Photo by Cldus<r>Rising Prices Don't Bother Them — Theof cosmetics has resulted in college girls at NcCollege, Cleveland, O., making their own coIhand lotions, and other beautifiers. Here Rulland Geraldine Feldhake are mixing up a batclkream, some of which they will sell to other stuTypical Freshman Co-ed at the University of Wichita is pretty AnnabelleDean, left, of Wichita. She is 18 years old, weighs 119M pounds, andis 64^ inches tall. She comes nearest to being the “average" of 222freshman girls examined this fail by the women's physical education de¬partment. Lois Shelton, assistant in the department, is checking Anna-belle's measurements.impshiretile third»i Alpharal Arts.Regains Sight — Bernard M. Keilmurray,freshman adviser at Yale University, marvelsat the changes of the past five years as, mirac¬ulously, his sisht comes bach followins fiveyears of total blindness. He could not ex¬plain the miracle, neither could physicians.Dunking Freshmen by Long Distance — Campus Day at Reed College, Portland, Ore., finds students andfaculty abandoning the classroom for the lawn, lake, and canyon. Highlight is the Frosh-Soph tug of war over thelake. The freshmen lost this year and the picture tells why by the grim look on the faces of the sophomore“tuggers" Collesutc Disrst Photo by Cldus<r>Rising Prices Don't Bother Them — Theof cosmetics has resulted in college girls at NcCollege, Cleveland, O., making their own coIhand lotions, and other beautifiers. Here Rulland Geraldine Feldhake are mixing up a batclkream, some of which they will sell to other stuTypical Freshman Co-ed at the University of Wichita is pretty AnnabelleDean, left, of Wichita. She is 18 years old, weighs 119M pounds, andis 64^ inches tall. She comes nearest to being the “average" of 222freshman girls examined this fail by the women's physical education de¬partment. Lois Shelton, assistant in the department, is checking Anna-belle's measurements.M««t lh« Gant — President Jim Gillen of Beta Sisma fraternity of Manhattan Collegepresents Bandman Glenn Miller and his popular songstress, Marion Hutton, to members ofthe fraternity during a recent Victory Dance. CoUcBMte Discfl Photo byWhat Knotty Lest You Have, Grandma! — A "Turnabout Party"furnished plenty of fun and this fetching picture for residents of ChamberlainHouse, men's hall at the University of Wisconsin. This typically dressedcouple are "Mr." Jane Farnsworth and "Miss" George Schmidt. Chud^co*Puliins 0 Tradition — Each year freshmen of Arizona State Teachers College (Flagstaff),must pull the Homecominq King and Queen through the streets of the city to earn the right todispense with their green beanies. The giant logging wheels arc used to signify the students'nickname of "Lumberjacks". Coiitswie Ois*»t ptkxo by Mo^mBasketball Celebrates Its Fiftieth BirthdaNo ^ort in the category of competitive pastimes has grownand flourished as has basketball in the brief years it has beenin existence. Just fifty years ago Dr. James Naismith hungtwo peach baskets at opposite ends of the Springfield(Mass.) College gymnasium and invented the cage game.From this crude beginning, basketball has expanded untiltoday it is played by teams in more than fifty nations. It isreliably reported that last year upward of eighty millionsattended games throughout the United States.This Temple of Basketball will be erected in Springfield, Mass., to honor* the game's inventor. Its archives will preserve the names, records, and ac¬complishments of all great players and teams of the past, present and future.A student made this sketch during the first game in 1891. Notice the refereeon ladder ready to retrieve the ball.The first basketball team, consisting of nine players and their coach, posed on the steps of th'Springfield College gymnasium in 1891. Dr. Naismith is in civilian attire. Evidently walrumustaches were a crime requisite for athletes of that day.M««t lh« Gant — President Jim Gillen of Beta Sisma fraternity of Manhattan Collegepresents Bandman Glenn Miller and his popular songstress, Marion Hutton, to members ofthe fraternity during a recent Victory Dance. CoUcBMte Discfl Photo byWhat Knotty Lest You Have, Grandma! — A "Turnabout Party"furnished plenty of fun and this fetching picture for residents of ChamberlainHouse, men's hall at the University of Wisconsin. This typically dressedcouple are "Mr." Jane Farnsworth and "Miss" George Schmidt. Chud^co*Puliins 0 Tradition — Each year freshmen of Arizona State Teachers College (Flagstaff),must pull the Homecominq King and Queen through the streets of the city to earn the right todispense with their green beanies. The giant logging wheels arc used to signify the students'nickname of "Lumberjacks". Coiitswie Ois*»t ptkxo by Mo^mBasketball Celebrates Its Fiftieth BirthdaNo ^ort in the category of competitive pastimes has grownand flourished as has basketball in the brief years it has beenin existence. Just fifty years ago Dr. James Naismith hungtwo peach baskets at opposite ends of the Springfield(Mass.) College gymnasium and invented the cage game.From this crude beginning, basketball has expanded untiltoday it is played by teams in more than fifty nations. It isreliably reported that last year upward of eighty millionsattended games throughout the United States.This Temple of Basketball will be erected in Springfield, Mass., to honor* the game's inventor. Its archives will preserve the names, records, and ac¬complishments of all great players and teams of the past, present and future.A student made this sketch during the first game in 1891. Notice the refereeon ladder ready to retrieve the ball.The first basketball team, consisting of nine players and their coach, posed on the steps of th'Springfield College gymnasium in 1891. Dr. Naismith is in civilian attire. Evidently walrumustaches were a crime requisite for athletes of that day.f*f a Topiy-Turvy world for Emory University frosh on Fresh-nan Day. They are forced to wear tireir clothes backwards, walkbackwards, and eat backwards. At the Sisma Pi house, Georseerryman, Dewey Gillespie, and Bob Lorenson ate peas withheir knives while Sophomore Roy Jones (second from left) acts$ supervisorh.jro by r.frn«n• nq cos- Dollars for a Head ol Hair — The bar-— .me these Nlorth- privileqe of thfs haircut. EdwardCoinK ^*|f*U»wkins Dance*he»a a „ A. Orth holds the "foldinq douqh" in his hand asITthe annual ^^‘'..V^rDeKalb, |««no.s. > hrs fellow Lehiqh University dorm members shaveState Teachers jugs of cidcr ^ead. Somehow the January winds feeltunreMcK wibillyto him this year.Coll(9i«te Disett Photo by Schw*mChinese Santa — Always willing to lend a helping hand is LungMao, Chinese student at the University of Chicago. When he heardthat Volunteers of America were having a hard time finding enoughSanta Clauses to stand on Chicago street corners to assist in Christmascollection, he volunteered his services.AcmfJC)le0ialeDi6es}MMIONAL jhDVlttmiMIMblicolioat OfHc*; It3 F«wli«tuiiaiM. MiM«apaUt;-- lifylcfTNCr4te MMlitwt'Maw400 No. MkWsM Avonoo, CUoho■ WU- «■ 1---Toufh Schedule Ahead — Here’show New York University's basketballteam lined up just before the first of ahard 20-game schedule. Varsity play¬ers are (left to ri^ht) Mort Lazar, BobDavidoff, Jim Coward, Paul Payne,and Manny Schuman. Acmrf*f a Topiy-Turvy world for Emory University frosh on Fresh-nan Day. They are forced to wear tireir clothes backwards, walkbackwards, and eat backwards. At the Sisma Pi house, Georseerryman, Dewey Gillespie, and Bob Lorenson ate peas withheir knives while Sophomore Roy Jones (second from left) acts$ supervisorh.jro by r.frn«n• nq cos- Dollars for a Head ol Hair — The bar-— .me these Nlorth- privileqe of thfs haircut. EdwardCoinK ^*|f*U»wkins Dance*he»a a „ A. Orth holds the "foldinq douqh" in his hand asITthe annual ^^‘'..V^rDeKalb, |««no.s. > hrs fellow Lehiqh University dorm members shaveState Teachers jugs of cidcr ^ead. Somehow the January winds feeltunreMcK wibillyto him this year.Coll(9i«te Disett Photo by Schw*mChinese Santa — Always willing to lend a helping hand is LungMao, Chinese student at the University of Chicago. When he heardthat Volunteers of America were having a hard time finding enoughSanta Clauses to stand on Chicago street corners to assist in Christmascollection, he volunteered his services.AcmfJC)le0ialeDi6es}MMIONAL jhDVlttmiMIMblicolioat OfHc*; It3 F«wli«tuiiaiM. MiM«apaUt;-- lifylcfTNCr4te MMlitwt'Maw400 No. MkWsM Avonoo, CUoho■ WU- «■ 1---Toufh Schedule Ahead — Here’show New York University's basketballteam lined up just before the first of ahard 20-game schedule. Varsity play¬ers are (left to ri^ht) Mort Lazar, BobDavidoff, Jim Coward, Paul Payne,and Manny Schuman. AcmrCv.« SanM Trip* A« LifM F.nta.h* *i Cri.lom,.Fr»rHouses dance. Se.e.al hund.ed couples danced am,d athemes -an,ins (tom a smohe-filled Pans cafe to an almosphen d,ChiTstmas (esiivily. With (ive o.cheslias playms dances c.tculaledi,from one house to anothei.Center of Attraction with these Michisan StateCollese co-eds is Gerald E. Smith who plays aleading role in the collese's student productionof "Stase Door”. The lucky guy!cVIt Pays to be Popular — Winners of the University Daily Kansan popularity con¬test smile at the checks awarded them. Miriam Bartlett, Pi Beta Phi, used hers for atrip to Sun Valley, Idaho, while Kenneth Ketchum, independent took in the RoseBowl game during the Christmas vacation...««fanl tor Alluiprimps before the mirrortouches with— Princess Agatha, played by- s.isc mirror as “her” maid. Bill Close, applitouches with a disinfectant sprayer. They arc rehearsing tlscene of the University of Pennsylvania's Mask and Wig f"Out of This World”.Wtdr WorldCv.« SanM Trip* A« LifM F.nta.h* *i Cri.lom,.Fr»rHouses dance. Se.e.al hund.ed couples danced am,d athemes -an,ins (tom a smohe-filled Pans cafe to an almosphen d,ChiTstmas (esiivily. With (ive o.cheslias playms dances c.tculaledi,from one house to anothei.Center of Attraction with these Michisan StateCollese co-eds is Gerald E. Smith who plays aleading role in the collese's student productionof "Stase Door”. The lucky guy!cVIt Pays to be Popular — Winners of the University Daily Kansan popularity con¬test smile at the checks awarded them. Miriam Bartlett, Pi Beta Phi, used hers for atrip to Sun Valley, Idaho, while Kenneth Ketchum, independent took in the RoseBowl game during the Christmas vacation...««fanl tor Alluiprimps before the mirrortouches with— Princess Agatha, played by- s.isc mirror as “her” maid. Bill Close, applitouches with a disinfectant sprayer. They arc rehearsing tlscene of the University of Pennsylvania's Mask and Wig f"Out of This World”.Wtdr World