the Dcuiu Tlki/icKynVol. 4l,No. 30 Z-149THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941Price Three CentsBob Becui Will HeadWashington PromPlanning CommitteeBob Bean, Psi U junior, has beennamed chairman of the WashingtonI'roni by the Social Committee,Other students who will aid in theplanning for the dance will be namedMonday, when the complete commit¬tee will be announced.The Social Committee has employedan agent to work full time to engagea band which will insure the Prom’ssuccess. The committee hopes toavoid the difficulty of past years whichhas resulted from signing an orches¬tra too late. By beginning negotia¬tions early, the chances of securing aname band for the February date aregreatly enhanced.In keeping with Social Committeepolicy for ’41-’42, to provide biggerand better dances and orchestras forless money, the ’42 Wash Prom willbring no increase in price of bids,but will be even larger and more en¬tertaining than last year’s.One of the worst shocksfelt in recent years was re¬corded on the University seis¬mograph in Rosenwald at12:14 yesterday afternoonaccording to Hilmut Lands-berg, associate professor olmeteorology.First reported by a seismo¬graph in England where theshock almost shattered theinstrument, the probably epi¬center was a line runningnorth and south through themiddle of the AtlanticOcean, said Landsberg, andit might have seriously af¬fected Greenland and Ice¬land. The Associated Pressindicated the Madiera Is-^ lands as the probable loca¬tion.Bob Bean■Interview Hercik-CzechStudent Tells OfHasty Flight To ParisAfter Nazi OnslaughtBy JAMES MACLFTaR out of France, of course.”The tale of how a Czech student fled | Convoyed through Gibraltar to CasParis by bicycle in the German on-! ablanca, the ship followed the coast ofslaught of June, 1940 and landed a i Africa down to Dakar where the cap-year and a half later in New York tain announced there would be awith an American visa, and a trunkful j week’s stay. Instead of a week, thoof documents concerning the French ! company remained in Dakar fromarmistice was disclosed in an inter- January to May, excited from time toview yesterday with Vladimir Hercik, | time by announcements of impendingstudent at the Chicago Theological; departure which never materialized.Seminary, “By the end of April,” narrated Mr.Having remained at the University j Hercik, “w'e wei'e becoming sceptical,of Paris up to the last moment in [ The food was very bad. The weatherorder to complete four out of the five j (Continued on page three)necessary examinations, Hercik and j ——U.S. PremiereOf 'Canzoni'By CollegiumRenewWeatherCoursesBachman To DhectBand At Fall ConcertiIn Mandel Sundaysome friends from the Czech Protes¬tant Mission cycled out of Paris justten hours before the German occupa¬tion. When the party reached Orleans,the city was in chaos. “It was herethat I received my first real taste ofwar,” stated the young Czech. “Wewere bombed ten times during the dayand after the bombings, mobs pillaged, , . ^and looted the shops. Here too, I was | Tjie American premiere ofseparated from my friends although I zoni,” by Salomone Rossi and Sig-we met again in Pau.”From Orleans, Hercik cycled thefour hundred miles to Bayonne on theSpanish frontier. Learning, severaldays after his arrival that Bayonnewas to be in Occupied France, heagain set out, this time eastward toPau in the Pyrenees, where he re¬joined his party. After resting threeweeks, the group journeyed to Mar¬seilles in hopes of finding passagethere. Kept waiting from August toOctober for his exit visa, Hercik madegood use of his time by going north tothe town of Clermont-Ferrand, wherethe University of Strasbourg had beentransplanted. Here, he took his fifthiind last examination toward his de¬gree, and returned to Marseilles withthe intention of setting sail for Brazil.As Hercik explained, “This was ouronly chance since Spain refused to is-f^ue visas, especially to Czech andPolish people. We finally embarked onJan. 16. The ship was very crowded,ino.stly with Spanish Republicans.There were the former president ofSpain, some of his ministers, manydoctors, lawyers, professors, and jour-nali.sts. We werp all very happy to beNo Mix-upTo allay rumors. Assistant Deanof Students William J. Scott an¬nounced yesterday that there wasno moving up of the date of frater¬nity initiation despite, the earlierpledging date. Two quarters of res¬idence are still necessary before in¬itiation.mund Levarie will be performed atthe first concert of the CollegiumMusicum.Rossi was a court musician in Vi¬enna around 1600 where his workswere highly acclaimed by the publicof his day. Since then his manuscriptshave rested in obscurity until Dr.Levarie found them in an old Vienneselibrary. Levarie started editing andtranscribing them for strings. Thissets some sort of record for longtime collaboration.In the old manuscript, music wasmarked “alcuni instrumenti,” whichmeans “for any instrument.” The newversion will soon be published by Dim-it in New York. The music is to beplayed from Dr. Levarie’s own manu¬scripts December 3 at InternationalHouse.The continuance of the meteorologyprogram in cooperation with the AirCorps, the Weather Bureau, and theCivilian Aeronautics Authority wasannounced yesterday by ProfessorCarl Rossby, head of the Meteorologydepartment.The course for the next group ofstudents will begin July 1. There willbe 25 openings for Flying Cadets and22 for those sponsored by the WeatherBureau of the CAA. The present pro¬gram has enrolled the same numberof men.Although students from both classi¬fications take the same courses theFlying Cadets receive $127.50 a month.After completing the program theyare sent to Selfridge Field in Mich¬igan to receive some flight training.They are then commissioned as sec¬ond lieutenants in the Air Corps anddo meteorological work.Receive $75 a MonthThe others receive $75 a month andhave their choice of work in theArmy, the Navy, or the Weather Bu¬reau. About 75 percent go into theNavy Rossby, said, because thatbranch of the service offers no spe¬cialized training of its own. They re¬ceive commissions as second lieuten¬ants in the army or ensigns in thenavy.Applications must be filed far inadvance for this program with thegovernment demanding certain phys¬ical requirements and the Universityacademic requirements. Science ma¬jors are preferred with a knowledge ofmathematics and physics indispensa¬ble.Dean Rossby emphasized the im¬portance of an early decision regard¬ing the progi*am to allow students totake courses in the next two quarterswhich would be particularly helpfulpreparation. Further information maybe obtained from his secretary in Ry-erson 356.Harold BachmanAppointAugeiCosmic KidTo FacultyAppointment of Dr. Pierre Auger,the outstanding French scientist in thefield of cosmic ray research and oneof the leading physicists of France, tothe post of research associate in phys¬ics at the University, was announcedrecently by President Hutchins.Although only 42, Dr. Auger has al¬ready won acclaim for two discoveries,the “Auger effect”, the multiple photo¬electric effect with x-rays, and the“giant showers” of cosmic rays. Hewill continue his investigations of cos¬mic rays in his research at the Uni¬versity.Harold Bachman, Director of theUniversity of Chicago Band will directthe annual Fall Concert of that groupin Mandel Hall next Sunday, Novem¬ber 30, at 3:30. Bachman who is na¬tionally known as the conductor of theAmerican Legion Band for the year1941-42, is in his sixth year on theQuadrangles where he has introducedmany compositions new to the musicworld.Sunday’s concert will feature ninepresentations chosen by Mr. Bachmanand the members of the band them¬selves. The type of concert given onthe quadrangles is thoroughly enjoyedby the members of the band andtherefore has always proven of inter¬est to everyone.Scheduled for Sunday is a programof varied interest because it containsworks by several composers and ofseveral types. First selection to beplayed is a choral melody, Komm Sus-ser Tod by Bach which will be fol¬lowed by the Allegro Maestro fromHandel’s Water Music Suite and ar¬ranged by Don Malin.Next the band will play the Queenof Hearts, Overture by Gagnier. Afterthis will come a group of numbers“showing off” the various section ofthe band such as the woodwind section,the brasses, and the percussion instru¬ments. Fifth on the program is theCoronation Scene from Boris Godou-now by Moussorgsky.Garden of the Gods, a lyric poemdedicated by Rubertis to the Uni¬versity of Chicago Band will then beplayed for the first time in this cityTFollowing this memorable composi¬tion are Three Negro Dances by Flor¬ence B. Price. The band and Mr. Bach¬man have chosen four selections hon¬oring the Army, the U.S. Naval Re¬serves, the Air Corps, and the Amer¬ican Patrol to add a military air tothe program.Student DirectoryRolls Off Presses InBright Green; GivesData On All StudentsPaul Hindemith On Modern ArtIs Next Moody Lecture SlatePaul Hindemith, professor of musictheory at Yale University, will speako n “Understanding ContemporaryMusic,” December 4 in Mandel Hallat 8:30. This lecture is sponsored bythe William Vaughn Moody Founda¬tion.Born in Hanau, Germany, Profes¬sor Hindemith first won fame as aviolinist and later as a composer. Hetook an active part in the Donaue-schingen Festivals (1921-1926), thentransferred to Baden-Baden (1927-19-29) and Berlin (1930), and became theoutstanding figure in modern Germanmusic, as evidenced by the number ofmusicians who attended these fetesyearly. Subsequent to his arrival inthe United States, he taught in theBerlin Hochschule (^927-1937) andplayed the viola both as a soloist andas a member of the Amar quartet. Re¬cent political events in his native landhave caused Hindemith’s compositionsto be banned there.Student Directory, newly reuphol¬stered in bright green, yesterday ap¬peared on the Quadrangles. One ofthe minor annual efforts of the Uni¬versity Press, it is being marketed atthe entrance to Cobb Hall and diversother prominent places, for a solitaryshilling.Investing students will find withinits pages names, addresses, and tele¬phone numbers of all students in theCU MeetsProfessorsSaturdayProfessors Merle Coulter, MaynardKrueger, Howard Carter, and JosephLohman will be included in ChapelUnion’s Meet-Your-Professor outingto be held at Palos Park Saturday, itwas announced today by co-chairmenBob Boyer and Gloria Edwards. Pricefor the outing is 70c of which 50cmust be deposited by Thursday in theoffice of Rockefeller Memorial Chapel.A list is now posted in the Chapeloffice where limited reservations willbe made for 20 students of which tenmust be new students. Students in¬tent on going to Chapel Union’s latestouting are instructed to bring packedlunches and be prepared for recreationand discussion with the four popularUniversity professors named above.University, also addresses and phonenumbers of fraternities, residencehalls, and club presidents. Included inaddition is a list of University officersand offices.For years the Directory has beendoing yeoman service as substitutefor the proverbial “little black book”.This year’s, listing everyone fromglamorpants Traeger on down, will beno exception.Among other things your twenty-five cents brings you forty-sevenSmiths, forty-one Johnsons, five Nich¬ols, six cats (Katzs), one dog (Doig),and one Robert McCormick (no colo¬nel).Also revealed is the fact that theUniversity is housing two Washing¬tons, two Hoovers, two Coolidges, aJefferson, a Madison, three Hardings,and one Monroe.Schmitt To SpeakTonight On PeaceBernadotte E. Schmitt will spealtonight in Social Science 122 at 8:0(on the subject “The Roosevelt-Church-ill Points and the Conditions olPeace.” Professor Schmitt is one olthe leaders of the group that holdsGermany responsible for the IasiWorld War.Distinguished Service Professor andalso winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Pro¬fessor Schmitt will lecture under thesponsorship of the Graduate HistoryClub.the Dcuiu Tlki/icKynVol. 4l,No. 30 Z-149THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941Price Three CentsBob Becui Will HeadWashington PromPlanning CommitteeBob Bean, Psi U junior, has beennamed chairman of the WashingtonI'roni by the Social Committee,Other students who will aid in theplanning for the dance will be namedMonday, when the complete commit¬tee will be announced.The Social Committee has employedan agent to work full time to engagea band which will insure the Prom’ssuccess. The committee hopes toavoid the difficulty of past years whichhas resulted from signing an orches¬tra too late. By beginning negotia¬tions early, the chances of securing aname band for the February date aregreatly enhanced.In keeping with Social Committeepolicy for ’41-’42, to provide biggerand better dances and orchestras forless money, the ’42 Wash Prom willbring no increase in price of bids,but will be even larger and more en¬tertaining than last year’s.One of the worst shocksfelt in recent years was re¬corded on the University seis¬mograph in Rosenwald at12:14 yesterday afternoonaccording to Hilmut Lands-berg, associate professor olmeteorology.First reported by a seismo¬graph in England where theshock almost shattered theinstrument, the probably epi¬center was a line runningnorth and south through themiddle of the AtlanticOcean, said Landsberg, andit might have seriously af¬fected Greenland and Ice¬land. The Associated Pressindicated the Madiera Is-^ lands as the probable loca¬tion.Bob Bean■Interview Hercik-CzechStudent Tells OfHasty Flight To ParisAfter Nazi OnslaughtBy JAMES MACLFTaR out of France, of course.”The tale of how a Czech student fled | Convoyed through Gibraltar to CasParis by bicycle in the German on-! ablanca, the ship followed the coast ofslaught of June, 1940 and landed a i Africa down to Dakar where the cap-year and a half later in New York tain announced there would be awith an American visa, and a trunkful j week’s stay. Instead of a week, thoof documents concerning the French ! company remained in Dakar fromarmistice was disclosed in an inter- January to May, excited from time toview yesterday with Vladimir Hercik, | time by announcements of impendingstudent at the Chicago Theological; departure which never materialized.Seminary, “By the end of April,” narrated Mr.Having remained at the University j Hercik, “w'e wei'e becoming sceptical,of Paris up to the last moment in [ The food was very bad. The weatherorder to complete four out of the five j (Continued on page three)necessary examinations, Hercik and j ——U.S. PremiereOf 'Canzoni'By CollegiumRenewWeatherCoursesBachman To DhectBand At Fall ConcertiIn Mandel Sundaysome friends from the Czech Protes¬tant Mission cycled out of Paris justten hours before the German occupa¬tion. When the party reached Orleans,the city was in chaos. “It was herethat I received my first real taste ofwar,” stated the young Czech. “Wewere bombed ten times during the dayand after the bombings, mobs pillaged, , . ^and looted the shops. Here too, I was | Tjie American premiere ofseparated from my friends although I zoni,” by Salomone Rossi and Sig-we met again in Pau.”From Orleans, Hercik cycled thefour hundred miles to Bayonne on theSpanish frontier. Learning, severaldays after his arrival that Bayonnewas to be in Occupied France, heagain set out, this time eastward toPau in the Pyrenees, where he re¬joined his party. After resting threeweeks, the group journeyed to Mar¬seilles in hopes of finding passagethere. Kept waiting from August toOctober for his exit visa, Hercik madegood use of his time by going north tothe town of Clermont-Ferrand, wherethe University of Strasbourg had beentransplanted. Here, he took his fifthiind last examination toward his de¬gree, and returned to Marseilles withthe intention of setting sail for Brazil.As Hercik explained, “This was ouronly chance since Spain refused to is-f^ue visas, especially to Czech andPolish people. We finally embarked onJan. 16. The ship was very crowded,ino.stly with Spanish Republicans.There were the former president ofSpain, some of his ministers, manydoctors, lawyers, professors, and jour-nali.sts. We werp all very happy to beNo Mix-upTo allay rumors. Assistant Deanof Students William J. Scott an¬nounced yesterday that there wasno moving up of the date of frater¬nity initiation despite, the earlierpledging date. Two quarters of res¬idence are still necessary before in¬itiation.mund Levarie will be performed atthe first concert of the CollegiumMusicum.Rossi was a court musician in Vi¬enna around 1600 where his workswere highly acclaimed by the publicof his day. Since then his manuscriptshave rested in obscurity until Dr.Levarie found them in an old Vienneselibrary. Levarie started editing andtranscribing them for strings. Thissets some sort of record for longtime collaboration.In the old manuscript, music wasmarked “alcuni instrumenti,” whichmeans “for any instrument.” The newversion will soon be published by Dim-it in New York. The music is to beplayed from Dr. Levarie’s own manu¬scripts December 3 at InternationalHouse.The continuance of the meteorologyprogram in cooperation with the AirCorps, the Weather Bureau, and theCivilian Aeronautics Authority wasannounced yesterday by ProfessorCarl Rossby, head of the Meteorologydepartment.The course for the next group ofstudents will begin July 1. There willbe 25 openings for Flying Cadets and22 for those sponsored by the WeatherBureau of the CAA. The present pro¬gram has enrolled the same numberof men.Although students from both classi¬fications take the same courses theFlying Cadets receive $127.50 a month.After completing the program theyare sent to Selfridge Field in Mich¬igan to receive some flight training.They are then commissioned as sec¬ond lieutenants in the Air Corps anddo meteorological work.Receive $75 a MonthThe others receive $75 a month andhave their choice of work in theArmy, the Navy, or the Weather Bu¬reau. About 75 percent go into theNavy Rossby, said, because thatbranch of the service offers no spe¬cialized training of its own. They re¬ceive commissions as second lieuten¬ants in the army or ensigns in thenavy.Applications must be filed far inadvance for this program with thegovernment demanding certain phys¬ical requirements and the Universityacademic requirements. Science ma¬jors are preferred with a knowledge ofmathematics and physics indispensa¬ble.Dean Rossby emphasized the im¬portance of an early decision regard¬ing the progi*am to allow students totake courses in the next two quarterswhich would be particularly helpfulpreparation. Further information maybe obtained from his secretary in Ry-erson 356.Harold BachmanAppointAugeiCosmic KidTo FacultyAppointment of Dr. Pierre Auger,the outstanding French scientist in thefield of cosmic ray research and oneof the leading physicists of France, tothe post of research associate in phys¬ics at the University, was announcedrecently by President Hutchins.Although only 42, Dr. Auger has al¬ready won acclaim for two discoveries,the “Auger effect”, the multiple photo¬electric effect with x-rays, and the“giant showers” of cosmic rays. Hewill continue his investigations of cos¬mic rays in his research at the Uni¬versity.Harold Bachman, Director of theUniversity of Chicago Band will directthe annual Fall Concert of that groupin Mandel Hall next Sunday, Novem¬ber 30, at 3:30. Bachman who is na¬tionally known as the conductor of theAmerican Legion Band for the year1941-42, is in his sixth year on theQuadrangles where he has introducedmany compositions new to the musicworld.Sunday’s concert will feature ninepresentations chosen by Mr. Bachmanand the members of the band them¬selves. The type of concert given onthe quadrangles is thoroughly enjoyedby the members of the band andtherefore has always proven of inter¬est to everyone.Scheduled for Sunday is a programof varied interest because it containsworks by several composers and ofseveral types. First selection to beplayed is a choral melody, Komm Sus-ser Tod by Bach which will be fol¬lowed by the Allegro Maestro fromHandel’s Water Music Suite and ar¬ranged by Don Malin.Next the band will play the Queenof Hearts, Overture by Gagnier. Afterthis will come a group of numbers“showing off” the various section ofthe band such as the woodwind section,the brasses, and the percussion instru¬ments. Fifth on the program is theCoronation Scene from Boris Godou-now by Moussorgsky.Garden of the Gods, a lyric poemdedicated by Rubertis to the Uni¬versity of Chicago Band will then beplayed for the first time in this cityTFollowing this memorable composi¬tion are Three Negro Dances by Flor¬ence B. Price. The band and Mr. Bach¬man have chosen four selections hon¬oring the Army, the U.S. Naval Re¬serves, the Air Corps, and the Amer¬ican Patrol to add a military air tothe program.Student DirectoryRolls Off Presses InBright Green; GivesData On All StudentsPaul Hindemith On Modern ArtIs Next Moody Lecture SlatePaul Hindemith, professor of musictheory at Yale University, will speako n “Understanding ContemporaryMusic,” December 4 in Mandel Hallat 8:30. This lecture is sponsored bythe William Vaughn Moody Founda¬tion.Born in Hanau, Germany, Profes¬sor Hindemith first won fame as aviolinist and later as a composer. Hetook an active part in the Donaue-schingen Festivals (1921-1926), thentransferred to Baden-Baden (1927-19-29) and Berlin (1930), and became theoutstanding figure in modern Germanmusic, as evidenced by the number ofmusicians who attended these fetesyearly. Subsequent to his arrival inthe United States, he taught in theBerlin Hochschule (^927-1937) andplayed the viola both as a soloist andas a member of the Amar quartet. Re¬cent political events in his native landhave caused Hindemith’s compositionsto be banned there.Student Directory, newly reuphol¬stered in bright green, yesterday ap¬peared on the Quadrangles. One ofthe minor annual efforts of the Uni¬versity Press, it is being marketed atthe entrance to Cobb Hall and diversother prominent places, for a solitaryshilling.Investing students will find withinits pages names, addresses, and tele¬phone numbers of all students in theCU MeetsProfessorsSaturdayProfessors Merle Coulter, MaynardKrueger, Howard Carter, and JosephLohman will be included in ChapelUnion’s Meet-Your-Professor outingto be held at Palos Park Saturday, itwas announced today by co-chairmenBob Boyer and Gloria Edwards. Pricefor the outing is 70c of which 50cmust be deposited by Thursday in theoffice of Rockefeller Memorial Chapel.A list is now posted in the Chapeloffice where limited reservations willbe made for 20 students of which tenmust be new students. Students in¬tent on going to Chapel Union’s latestouting are instructed to bring packedlunches and be prepared for recreationand discussion with the four popularUniversity professors named above.University, also addresses and phonenumbers of fraternities, residencehalls, and club presidents. Included inaddition is a list of University officersand offices.For years the Directory has beendoing yeoman service as substitutefor the proverbial “little black book”.This year’s, listing everyone fromglamorpants Traeger on down, will beno exception.Among other things your twenty-five cents brings you forty-sevenSmiths, forty-one Johnsons, five Nich¬ols, six cats (Katzs), one dog (Doig),and one Robert McCormick (no colo¬nel).Also revealed is the fact that theUniversity is housing two Washing¬tons, two Hoovers, two Coolidges, aJefferson, a Madison, three Hardings,and one Monroe.Schmitt To SpeakTonight On PeaceBernadotte E. Schmitt will spealtonight in Social Science 122 at 8:0(on the subject “The Roosevelt-Church-ill Points and the Conditions olPeace.” Professor Schmitt is one olthe leaders of the group that holdsGermany responsible for the IasiWorld War.Distinguished Service Professor andalso winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Pro¬fessor Schmitt will lecture under thesponsorship of the Graduate HistoryClub.Page TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941Bazaarist Goes HawthorneLoves Great Stone FacesThe Trotskyite TrialAnd Civil LibertiesWe hope the Department of Justice will dropits case against the Socialist Workers’ Party inMinneapolis. The Socialist Workers, betterknown as Trotskyites, are charged with plottingto overthrow the United States Government.We are not members of the Socialist Work¬ers’ Party or any other radical group; we thinkthe Trotskyites are mistaken and disagree withthem on many important issues. But we alsobelieve in freedom of expression and freedomof assembly even for people who are misguidedin their political thinking.It is true that the Trotskyites advocate avague theoretical “revolution.” Is advocatingrevolution going beyond the limits of freespeech? Should the G Men arrest every mis¬guided fanatic who wants to “overthrow thegovernment?” We think these questions werebest answered by the great Justice Holmes in’his dissenting opinion on the case of Gitlow vs.New York. Holmes maintained that people whoadvocate overthrowing the government shouldbe prosecuted only when there is a “clear andpresent danger” of their proposed revolutionbecoming successful.We agree with Justice Holmes. We think oneof the greatest dangers to the American systemof government lies in prosecuting extreme butharmless radicals. Such cases are too easilyused as precedents to justify more flagrantabuses of civil liberties.If such people are sent to jail, we are onlynext door to banning the great radical classicslike the Communist Manifesto and Lenin’s“State and the Revolution”. If we imprison peo¬ple who oppose the American form of govern¬ment we are endangering those who oppose theinstitutions closely allied to traditional Amer¬icanism. We may find ourselves prosecuting so¬cialists who are opposed to the capitalist sys¬tem which in the minds of too many people issynonymous with “Americanism.”If we accept the “clear and present danger”doctrine and decide that the Trotskyites shouldnot be prosecuted if there is no possibility oftheir revolution becoming successful, then wemust ask ourselves: “Will the Trotskyites be¬come dangerous?” “Are they really any menaceto the American system?”The American newspapers, even the NewYork Times, have not covered this case ade¬quately. We have therefore had to depend onthe Nation, the New Republic, and the Amer¬ican Civil Liberties Union for most of our in¬formation. According to these sources, theTrotskyites are in no sense “a clear and presentdanger.” They are miserably small—about 2000members, divided into an almost endless num¬ber of factions and armed with two .22 caliberrifles to “overthrow the government.”We do not think the Trotskyites are nearlyas much a danger to the American form of gov¬ernment as the notorious Smith Act underwhich they are being prosecuted. This law waspassed as a rider on defense legislation to bene¬fit a group of poll tax congressmen. Since thelaws against treason are adequate to protect usfrom armed insurrections, this law can serveno useful purpose. It can serve only as a tool inthe hands of the potential American Fascistswho would like to prohibit criticism of ouroligarchic southern election laws, and make peo¬ple believe in the capitalist system on the basisof blind faith rather than reason.J. B.Today on QuadranglesHistory Club, “The Roosevelt-Churchill Eight Pointsand the Terms of Peace”. Social Science 122, 8.Zoology Club, “Problems Relating to Periodicity inAnimals”, Zoology 14, 4:30.Opera Hour, “Tosca”, Reynolds Club Lounge, 4:30.Public Lecture, Dr. Norman C. Wetzel, GraduateEducation 126, 8.Socialist Club, Discussion of Burnham’s “ManagerialRevolution”, Frank Knight, Edward Shils, and OskarLange, 8, SS 105,GargoylesBy RUTH WEHLANAfter some three years of looking at faces andconnecting names with them, we have come to the con¬clusion that the best faces are those that have nonames. F’rinstance—the stone faces to be found slightlyabove the sight line on practically any of the Indianalimestone structures between 57th, 59th, Ellis, and Uni¬versity. There are particularly choice examples on Man-del Hall. On the right side of the stage door is a medie¬val-looking lady with a dribble on her chin. This samedribble has been there since the fall of 1938, and wethink that it would be nice if Buildings and Groundswiped it off for her. To the left and above the droolinglady are four or five varieties of face, all registeringdifferent stages of nausea. On the south side of Wie-boldt arch are the Culture Twins, known familiarlyto us as Stop and Go. “Go” has Greek above his headand is making a beckoning sort of gesture. “Stop” hasLatin above his head and is holding his hand in a posi¬tion closely approximating that of a traffic cop at Stateand Madison. Every morning we say hello to thetwins and every evening we say goodbye—it justdoesn’t seem right to ignore them.The Snows of Yesteryear DepartmentAsh Taylor, the blond venus of the Alpha Delt house,is currently dismembering cadavers at Northwesternmedical school. Lorraine Curtin, red-haired Wyvernwhom people used to mistake for Peggy Flynn Self, isengaged to an off campus man named Norm Nagel.This is all as it should be, for Lorraine herself is nowoff-campus. Jay Mullen, prime joyboy of the Chi Psilodge, is off in Con¬necticut some place,Wesleyan Collegewe think. Incident¬ally, have you not¬iced how very muchalike Andy Park andMullen are? Andy isblond and Jay isdark, but outside ofthis minor consid¬eration, they arereasonably accurate. . . pajamas . , . facsimiles of eachother.Things We Would Never Know If ItWeren't For The Coffee Shop:Frannie Tuttle has Allen Burris’ Deke pin. Cor¬rection: Beverly Glenn has a Beta pin, as advertised,but it belongs to Bob Kraybill. Dick Reynolds sathere ain’t no justice. He wants his name menfiohithe Bazaar; “Doc” Reed_doesn’t want his name men¬tioned. “Doc”’s name appeared twice yesterday; Dick’sdidn’t even appear once. Just to balance the situation,we will say “Dick Reynolds—Dick Reynolds—Dick Rey¬nolds”.We have found, in the depths of the C-shop, the hepchick than which there is no hepper. Her name is Ma¬mie and her-hair is red and she is a waitress. We trustthat it was not her eyelash we found in the sugarbowl at table number 11 yesterday. Anyone missing aneyelash may call for same at the reception desk in theMaroon office.Pollyanna... story of the week demonstrates that there is goodto be found in everything. One Mrs. Baum, resident ofBellwood, hung her laundry in the back yard to dry.Among the wet clothes was a fine pair of pajamaswhich turned up missing, as we say in the backwoods.A week later Mrs. Baum received a package throughthe mails. Inside the package was the pair of pajamas,neatly ironed, and a note which said, “Sorry, theydon’t fit”.Tfie OcJlxj TJh/iocnFOUNDED IN 1902The Daily Maroon is the official student newspaper of the Uni¬versity of Chicago, published mornings except Saturday, Sunday,and Monday during the Autumn, winter, and Spring quarters byThe^ Daily Maroon Company, 5831 University Avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:30 phone in stories to our printers. The Chief PrintingCompany, 148 West 62nd street. Telephones: Wentworth 6123 and6124.The University of Chicago assumes no responsibility for anystatements appearing in The Daily Maroon, or for any contractentered into by The Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves the rights of publication ofany material appearing in this paper. Subscription rates: $3 a year$4 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Entered as second class matter March 18, 1908, at the post office jat Chicago. Illinois, under the act of March 3, 1879.MemberPissocioted GoIIg^oIg PressDistributor ofGDlle6icile DibeslBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialJAMES BURTLE RICHARD PHILBRICK, ChairmanRICHARD HIMMEL ROBERT REYNOLDSBUSINESSEDGAR L. RACHLIN, Business ManagerRICHARD BOLKS, Advertising ManagerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATESRobert Lawson, Nancy Lesser, Beata Mueller, Philip RiefT, ChloeRoth, Stuart Schulberg. and Shirlee Smith.BUSINESS ASSOCIATESBusiness AssociatesGeorge Flanagan, Howard Kamin, Richard Petersen, RichardWallens, William Bell, Ellen TuttleNight Editors: Ray Poplett and June Cohen-Letter-Hand Asks ForFewer RushingRestrictionsAgain as in other years the Inter-fratemity Rushing Code has failed toaccomplish its purpose. So-called “dir¬ty” rushing reached the matter-of-fact stage during the last days ofrushing and the “extra legal code” ofmutual blindness to rushing infrac¬tions among fraternity men was againin force as in other years.I do not condemn “dirty” rushing.The fault does not lie with the fra¬ternity men. Rushing is friendly as¬sociation leading to real friendshipswhich is the basic reason for mostfreshmen joining a particular fra¬ternity. The present Rushing Codeconstitutes an unnatural limitation onthese friendly associations amongfraternity men and freshmen.I propose that the Rushing Code beabolished except for the new rulingwhich prohibits week night rushingin the men’s dorms.When I suggested this to CharlesPercy last spring he felt that it wouldresult in the wealthiest fraternitiespledging the highest calibre of menand staggering rushing expenses forall fraternities. I do not see any suchdanger. The number of freshmen whowould be influenced by expensive rush¬ing parties in addition to the ordinaryrushing functions would be negligible.Moreover the kind of freshman whow'ould be influenced by such a displayis hardly the type most fraternitieswould care to have as a member. Anyfreshman who stops to think mustrealize that if he joins a fraternitywith an expensive rushing programthat he will have to bear this financialburden himself later on.I believe that the new ruling in re¬gard to evening rushing in the men’sdorms is a step forward. The AutumnQuarter is a critical period in a fresh¬man’s life and anything that can bedone to assure a better start scho¬lastically is well worth the effort.Chester C. Hand. Jr.SOCIOLOGY CLUBLouis Wirth, professor of So¬ciology, will be the second speakerin the series on “Books that haveinfluenced me most” sponsored bythe Sociolgy Club Thursday, De¬cember 4.The meeting, open to everyonewill be held at 8 o’clock in the So¬cial Sciences Commons Room. Thefirst speaker was Professor ErnestBurgess.PLEDGE NOTEKappa Sigma announces the pledg-ing of Charles Bickert and John Guc-ich.LEX1162 E. 63rdPush Back SeatsLast Times TodayErrol Flynn—Fred MacMurray"DIVE BOMBER"also"ICE-CAPADES"THU—FRI—SATNovember 27-2B-2?HENRY FONDA—JOAN BENNETT■'WILD GEESE CALLING 'PlusDEAD END KIDS"SPOOKS RUN WILD "EXTRA! COLOR CARTOONNow under-armCream DeodorantsafelyStops PerspirationFreshmen and sophomores work¬ing for the Student Publicityboard should report at the officein Mitchell Tower today from 2:30to 4:30. Be sure to bring names ofhigh school .seniors.Read Swedenborg's'DIVINE LOVEAND WISDOM'lOc unabridgedat University and otherbookstores1. Does not rot dresses or men’sshirts. Does not irritate skin.2. No waiting to dry. Can beused right after shaving.3. Instantly stops perspirationfor 1 to 3 days. Removes odorfrom perspiration.4. A pure, white, greaseless,stainless vanishing cream.5. Arrid has been awarded theApproval Seal of the AmericanInstitute of Laundering forbeing harmless to fabrics.Arrid is th« LARGEST SELLINGDEODORANT. Try a jar todaylARRID__ At allalorM •elliac toU«t vHMla39< ■ i** (alao in 10« and S9« Jan)Get it atREADERSYour Campus Drug StoreWE DELIVERFree Campus Tel. #352WHO IS THE MOST%PHOTOGENIC COUPLEThe Winners Will Be Chosen From Pic¬tures Taken At The Inter-Fraternity BallBYWHALEN & BUCHANANSTUDIOTHE PRIZE!ONE DOZEN 8x10 PHOTOS5510 S. CORNELL THE CORNELL HOTELFAIRFAX 5400Page TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941Bazaarist Goes HawthorneLoves Great Stone FacesThe Trotskyite TrialAnd Civil LibertiesWe hope the Department of Justice will dropits case against the Socialist Workers’ Party inMinneapolis. The Socialist Workers, betterknown as Trotskyites, are charged with plottingto overthrow the United States Government.We are not members of the Socialist Work¬ers’ Party or any other radical group; we thinkthe Trotskyites are mistaken and disagree withthem on many important issues. But we alsobelieve in freedom of expression and freedomof assembly even for people who are misguidedin their political thinking.It is true that the Trotskyites advocate avague theoretical “revolution.” Is advocatingrevolution going beyond the limits of freespeech? Should the G Men arrest every mis¬guided fanatic who wants to “overthrow thegovernment?” We think these questions werebest answered by the great Justice Holmes in’his dissenting opinion on the case of Gitlow vs.New York. Holmes maintained that people whoadvocate overthrowing the government shouldbe prosecuted only when there is a “clear andpresent danger” of their proposed revolutionbecoming successful.We agree with Justice Holmes. We think oneof the greatest dangers to the American systemof government lies in prosecuting extreme butharmless radicals. Such cases are too easilyused as precedents to justify more flagrantabuses of civil liberties.If such people are sent to jail, we are onlynext door to banning the great radical classicslike the Communist Manifesto and Lenin’s“State and the Revolution”. If we imprison peo¬ple who oppose the American form of govern¬ment we are endangering those who oppose theinstitutions closely allied to traditional Amer¬icanism. We may find ourselves prosecuting so¬cialists who are opposed to the capitalist sys¬tem which in the minds of too many people issynonymous with “Americanism.”If we accept the “clear and present danger”doctrine and decide that the Trotskyites shouldnot be prosecuted if there is no possibility oftheir revolution becoming successful, then wemust ask ourselves: “Will the Trotskyites be¬come dangerous?” “Are they really any menaceto the American system?”The American newspapers, even the NewYork Times, have not covered this case ade¬quately. We have therefore had to depend onthe Nation, the New Republic, and the Amer¬ican Civil Liberties Union for most of our in¬formation. According to these sources, theTrotskyites are in no sense “a clear and presentdanger.” They are miserably small—about 2000members, divided into an almost endless num¬ber of factions and armed with two .22 caliberrifles to “overthrow the government.”We do not think the Trotskyites are nearlyas much a danger to the American form of gov¬ernment as the notorious Smith Act underwhich they are being prosecuted. This law waspassed as a rider on defense legislation to bene¬fit a group of poll tax congressmen. Since thelaws against treason are adequate to protect usfrom armed insurrections, this law can serveno useful purpose. It can serve only as a tool inthe hands of the potential American Fascistswho would like to prohibit criticism of ouroligarchic southern election laws, and make peo¬ple believe in the capitalist system on the basisof blind faith rather than reason.J. B.Today on QuadranglesHistory Club, “The Roosevelt-Churchill Eight Pointsand the Terms of Peace”. Social Science 122, 8.Zoology Club, “Problems Relating to Periodicity inAnimals”, Zoology 14, 4:30.Opera Hour, “Tosca”, Reynolds Club Lounge, 4:30.Public Lecture, Dr. Norman C. Wetzel, GraduateEducation 126, 8.Socialist Club, Discussion of Burnham’s “ManagerialRevolution”, Frank Knight, Edward Shils, and OskarLange, 8, SS 105,GargoylesBy RUTH WEHLANAfter some three years of looking at faces andconnecting names with them, we have come to the con¬clusion that the best faces are those that have nonames. F’rinstance—the stone faces to be found slightlyabove the sight line on practically any of the Indianalimestone structures between 57th, 59th, Ellis, and Uni¬versity. There are particularly choice examples on Man-del Hall. On the right side of the stage door is a medie¬val-looking lady with a dribble on her chin. This samedribble has been there since the fall of 1938, and wethink that it would be nice if Buildings and Groundswiped it off for her. To the left and above the droolinglady are four or five varieties of face, all registeringdifferent stages of nausea. On the south side of Wie-boldt arch are the Culture Twins, known familiarlyto us as Stop and Go. “Go” has Greek above his headand is making a beckoning sort of gesture. “Stop” hasLatin above his head and is holding his hand in a posi¬tion closely approximating that of a traffic cop at Stateand Madison. Every morning we say hello to thetwins and every evening we say goodbye—it justdoesn’t seem right to ignore them.The Snows of Yesteryear DepartmentAsh Taylor, the blond venus of the Alpha Delt house,is currently dismembering cadavers at Northwesternmedical school. Lorraine Curtin, red-haired Wyvernwhom people used to mistake for Peggy Flynn Self, isengaged to an off campus man named Norm Nagel.This is all as it should be, for Lorraine herself is nowoff-campus. Jay Mullen, prime joyboy of the Chi Psilodge, is off in Con¬necticut some place,Wesleyan Collegewe think. Incident¬ally, have you not¬iced how very muchalike Andy Park andMullen are? Andy isblond and Jay isdark, but outside ofthis minor consid¬eration, they arereasonably accurate. . . pajamas . , . facsimiles of eachother.Things We Would Never Know If ItWeren't For The Coffee Shop:Frannie Tuttle has Allen Burris’ Deke pin. Cor¬rection: Beverly Glenn has a Beta pin, as advertised,but it belongs to Bob Kraybill. Dick Reynolds sathere ain’t no justice. He wants his name menfiohithe Bazaar; “Doc” Reed_doesn’t want his name men¬tioned. “Doc”’s name appeared twice yesterday; Dick’sdidn’t even appear once. Just to balance the situation,we will say “Dick Reynolds—Dick Reynolds—Dick Rey¬nolds”.We have found, in the depths of the C-shop, the hepchick than which there is no hepper. Her name is Ma¬mie and her-hair is red and she is a waitress. We trustthat it was not her eyelash we found in the sugarbowl at table number 11 yesterday. Anyone missing aneyelash may call for same at the reception desk in theMaroon office.Pollyanna... story of the week demonstrates that there is goodto be found in everything. One Mrs. Baum, resident ofBellwood, hung her laundry in the back yard to dry.Among the wet clothes was a fine pair of pajamaswhich turned up missing, as we say in the backwoods.A week later Mrs. Baum received a package throughthe mails. Inside the package was the pair of pajamas,neatly ironed, and a note which said, “Sorry, theydon’t fit”.Tfie OcJlxj TJh/iocnFOUNDED IN 1902The Daily Maroon is the official student newspaper of the Uni¬versity of Chicago, published mornings except Saturday, Sunday,and Monday during the Autumn, winter, and Spring quarters byThe^ Daily Maroon Company, 5831 University Avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:30 phone in stories to our printers. The Chief PrintingCompany, 148 West 62nd street. Telephones: Wentworth 6123 and6124.The University of Chicago assumes no responsibility for anystatements appearing in The Daily Maroon, or for any contractentered into by The Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves the rights of publication ofany material appearing in this paper. Subscription rates: $3 a year$4 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Entered as second class matter March 18, 1908, at the post office jat Chicago. Illinois, under the act of March 3, 1879.MemberPissocioted GoIIg^oIg PressDistributor ofGDlle6icile DibeslBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialJAMES BURTLE RICHARD PHILBRICK, ChairmanRICHARD HIMMEL ROBERT REYNOLDSBUSINESSEDGAR L. RACHLIN, Business ManagerRICHARD BOLKS, Advertising ManagerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATESRobert Lawson, Nancy Lesser, Beata Mueller, Philip RiefT, ChloeRoth, Stuart Schulberg. and Shirlee Smith.BUSINESS ASSOCIATESBusiness AssociatesGeorge Flanagan, Howard Kamin, Richard Petersen, RichardWallens, William Bell, Ellen TuttleNight Editors: Ray Poplett and June Cohen-Letter-Hand Asks ForFewer RushingRestrictionsAgain as in other years the Inter-fratemity Rushing Code has failed toaccomplish its purpose. So-called “dir¬ty” rushing reached the matter-of-fact stage during the last days ofrushing and the “extra legal code” ofmutual blindness to rushing infrac¬tions among fraternity men was againin force as in other years.I do not condemn “dirty” rushing.The fault does not lie with the fra¬ternity men. Rushing is friendly as¬sociation leading to real friendshipswhich is the basic reason for mostfreshmen joining a particular fra¬ternity. The present Rushing Codeconstitutes an unnatural limitation onthese friendly associations amongfraternity men and freshmen.I propose that the Rushing Code beabolished except for the new rulingwhich prohibits week night rushingin the men’s dorms.When I suggested this to CharlesPercy last spring he felt that it wouldresult in the wealthiest fraternitiespledging the highest calibre of menand staggering rushing expenses forall fraternities. I do not see any suchdanger. The number of freshmen whowould be influenced by expensive rush¬ing parties in addition to the ordinaryrushing functions would be negligible.Moreover the kind of freshman whow'ould be influenced by such a displayis hardly the type most fraternitieswould care to have as a member. Anyfreshman who stops to think mustrealize that if he joins a fraternitywith an expensive rushing programthat he will have to bear this financialburden himself later on.I believe that the new ruling in re¬gard to evening rushing in the men’sdorms is a step forward. The AutumnQuarter is a critical period in a fresh¬man’s life and anything that can bedone to assure a better start scho¬lastically is well worth the effort.Chester C. Hand. Jr.SOCIOLOGY CLUBLouis Wirth, professor of So¬ciology, will be the second speakerin the series on “Books that haveinfluenced me most” sponsored bythe Sociolgy Club Thursday, De¬cember 4.The meeting, open to everyonewill be held at 8 o’clock in the So¬cial Sciences Commons Room. Thefirst speaker was Professor ErnestBurgess.PLEDGE NOTEKappa Sigma announces the pledg-ing of Charles Bickert and John Guc-ich.LEX1162 E. 63rdPush Back SeatsLast Times TodayErrol Flynn—Fred MacMurray"DIVE BOMBER"also"ICE-CAPADES"THU—FRI—SATNovember 27-2B-2?HENRY FONDA—JOAN BENNETT■'WILD GEESE CALLING 'PlusDEAD END KIDS"SPOOKS RUN WILD "EXTRA! COLOR CARTOONNow under-armCream DeodorantsafelyStops PerspirationFreshmen and sophomores work¬ing for the Student Publicityboard should report at the officein Mitchell Tower today from 2:30to 4:30. Be sure to bring names ofhigh school .seniors.Read Swedenborg's'DIVINE LOVEAND WISDOM'lOc unabridgedat University and otherbookstores1. Does not rot dresses or men’sshirts. Does not irritate skin.2. No waiting to dry. Can beused right after shaving.3. Instantly stops perspirationfor 1 to 3 days. Removes odorfrom perspiration.4. A pure, white, greaseless,stainless vanishing cream.5. Arrid has been awarded theApproval Seal of the AmericanInstitute of Laundering forbeing harmless to fabrics.Arrid is th« LARGEST SELLINGDEODORANT. Try a jar todaylARRID__ At allalorM •elliac toU«t vHMla39< ■ i** (alao in 10« and S9« Jan)Get it atREADERSYour Campus Drug StoreWE DELIVERFree Campus Tel. #352WHO IS THE MOST%PHOTOGENIC COUPLEThe Winners Will Be Chosen From Pic¬tures Taken At The Inter-Fraternity BallBYWHALEN & BUCHANANSTUDIOTHE PRIZE!ONE DOZEN 8x10 PHOTOS5510 S. CORNELL THE CORNELL HOTELFAIRFAX 5400THE DAILY MAROON, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941Page ThreeSocialistReviewTonightTonight’s book review round-table,first of three of its kind to be held onsuccessive Wednesdays under the di¬rection of the University SocialistClub, will include Professors Frank H.Knight, Oskar Lange, and EdwardShils of the division of the social sci¬ences, it was announced yesterday.The round table is scheduled to con¬vene in Social Science 105 at 7:30.Piscussuants Knight, Lange, andShils will confine their remarks toJames Burnham’s book, The Mana¬gerial Revolution. Burnham’s latestwork has caused considerable commentin social and political circles for itsinsight into contemporary trends.Professor Knight of the economicsdepartment is co-editor of the Journalof Political Economy and recently pre¬sented two symposium papers duringThe University’s Fiftieth anniversary.The dissertations were written for thedejiartments of philosophy and eco¬nomics.Lange is research associate for theCowles commission in the departmentof economics and is also associateprofessor. Shils, who will open discus¬sion on The Managerial Revolutionthis evening with a brief resume ofthe book’s theme, is instructor in thesocial sciences of the College,Remaining publications to be dis¬cussed in the three-book series will bethe Dean of Canterbury’s The SovietRower, A Socialist Sixth of the World,and a pamphlet published by the Na¬tional Resources Commission entitled“After Defense—What?” Participantsfor these subsequent Wednesday nightsessions have not yet been selected.Feature of the book review serieswill be that each book will be surveyedfrom various angles and no particularideas or opinions will be emphasized.YWCAFinanceDrive OnTo help support their activities forthe year, the Y.W.C.A. is promotingtheir annual finance drive, during theperiod of November 24 to December3. Scope of this year’s program, forwhich disbursements from the treas¬ury of the organization are made, in¬clude service projects, conferences, theNational Student Council, educationalwork, and campus functions.Contributions to the fund can begiven to any cabinet member. Therewill also be tables in Ida Noyes, Man-del Hall, and Cobb Hall.Heading the Young Women’s Chris¬tian Association of the University arethe Junior and Senior Cabinets, Mar¬jorie Woodrich, president of Y.W.C.A.,acts as chairman to the Senior Cabi¬net, composed of Peggy Zimmer, vice-president, Caroline Allen, secretary,Joan Augustus, treasurer, MildredReese, Margot Faust, Louise Kachel,Louise Cummins, Phyllis Richards,Shirley Borman, Betsy Kuh, Jean Car¬gill, Violet Escarraz, Janet Wagner,and Dorothy Meier.Chairmanship of the Junior CabinetCzech—(Continued from page one)Camera ClubAn opportunity to make theirown Christmas cards is being of¬fered to all the members of the In¬ternational House (Camera Club,("omplete equipment will be avail¬able at the meeting which the Clubis holding tonight at 7:30 in roomR at International housewas at its hottest. So we began nego¬tiations with an Argentine companyto have a boat come over for us. Themoney was all collected when therewas a new official announcement. Wewere to return to Casablanca in Mor¬occo and from there cross the ocean toMartinique. Arriving at Casablanca,we learned that Martinique was im¬possible and in three days, everyonewas insde an African concentrationcamp. Here we must be kept until wewere able to leave the country.”Catching a tropical fever and hav¬ing his visa expire were just,inciden¬tal matters to the main difficulty offinding a boat to the Americas. Finallyin September, a Portuguese ship boundfor New York made a call at Casa¬blanca and Hercik was able to securepassage. He arrived in the UnitedStates without further mishap exceptthat the British Authorities at Ber¬muda confiscated some of his notesand documents.SchedulePicturesFor ClubsFirst of the girls’ club pictures forCap and Gown will be taken today inIda Noyes by the De Haven Studios.The schedule for photographs will in¬clude one or two clubs each week dayfrom now until December 9.Pictures will be taken individuallyat ten minute intervals. The studiowill work in Room C from 9-12 andfrom 1-4. Schedules for each club willbe posted at club meetings by Cap andGown.The daily schedule follows:Wednesday, Nov. 26—Pi Delta PhiThursday, Nov. 27—Chi Rho SigmaFriday, Nov. 28—Morning—Alpha Chi ThetaAfternoon—Phi Beta DeltaMonday, Dec. 1—EsotericTuesday, Dec. 2—QuadranglerWednesday, Dec. 3—Mortar BoardThursday, Dec. 4—SigmaFriday, Dec. 5—Morning—Alpha EpsilonAfternoon—TriotaMonday, Dec. 8—WyvernTuesday, Dec. 9—Morning—Delta SigmaAfternoon—W y vernWednesday, Dec. 10—Morning—Pi Delta UpsilonAfternoon—Tau Sigma Upsilonis taken over by the vice-president ofthe “Y”. This cabinet consists ofCharlotte Allen, Mary Bogie, AnnabelBrown, Mary Elisabeth Davis, AudreyEarl, Harriet Eaton, Donis Fisher,Barbara Gilfillan, Lois Merker, CarolMiller, Lucille Peterson, Shirley Pet¬erson, Miriam Petty, Zipporah Potten-ger, Betty Schroder, and Ann Gardi¬ner.Offering an opportunity for discus¬sion of essential values for living, forpersonal counselling, recreation, fel¬lowship, and the development of lead¬ership qualities, the Y.W.C.A. hasattracted many new members. Theycontribute to the United Service Or¬ganizations, the National StudentCouncil, and the World Student Serv¬ice Fund. Besides being affiliated withthe National Y.W.C.A. they belong tothe World’s Student Christian Federa¬tion.-Financial Report-Emphasizes Double Financial'^Squeeze^^ Facing UniversityNow financial problems facing theprivately endowed universities andcolleges of the country are emphasizedin the annual financial report of theUniversity issued Saturday by HarveyC. Daines, comptroller.The University is still strugglingwith the major readjustments necessi¬tated by the depression-born declinein return from investments. It is nowconfronted with another major“.squeeze”, a reduction in student rev¬enues through operation of the Se¬lective Service Act and other defenseniea.sures, and the rising operatingcosts for supplies and non-academicwages and salaries.“That an enhancement of dividendson stock holdings will counterbalancethe effect of this double ‘squeeze’ isdubious, due to restrictions on cor¬porate earnings through governmentprice control and high income and ex¬cess profit taxes,” Mr. Daines says.“This added pressure on a budgetwhich has been highly compressed formore than a decade suggests a mostprecarious future.”The report which covers the fiscalyear 1940-1941 ending June 30, 1941shows the gross operating income ofthe University aggregated $10, 929,256for the year, against gross expendi¬tures of $10,826,767; the $102,489 ex¬cess was restricted income. But thegross income included consumable giftsof $1,675,477, or 14.3%, of which $979,-507 consisted of special gifts receivedin prior years which were applied tosupport the 1940-41 operations.Rate of return on the average bal¬ances of endowment funds was 4.24%compared with 4.17% in 1939-40 and6.2%, in 1929-30.Mr. Daines points out that “thisreduction of 1.96% is equivalent to adecline of 32% in rate of return or$1,435,819 in annual income if appliedto the present endowment.”At the close of the fiscal year thetotal assets owned amounted to $128,-781,040, an enhancement of $1,175,422during the year. Of the total, $73,320,-043 was in endowment, an increase of$750,855, and $44,619,015 had been in¬vested in plant and equipment. Thebalance is distributed under the cat¬egories of general, loan, and annuityfunds.Market value of all investmentswas 3.9% less than the book value of$76,932,176. The diversification of in¬vestment was as follows: Bonds,27.9% preferred stocks, 9.8%; com¬mon stocks, 28.1%; real estate, mort¬gages, and real estate contracts,33.7%; sundry, .5%.During the year, gifts paid in forall purposes amounted to $3,307,498of which $1,843,334 was for endow-men, $456,652 was unrestricted, andthe balance restricted in some man¬ner. During the two years ended June30, 1941, the University receivedpledges of $8,671,307, of which $5,-504,012 was credited to the FiftiethAnniversary Fund. Contributions oftrustees during this period amountedto $1,800,405. jDuring the last fiscal year 11,897students were enrolled, an increase of2% over the previous year. The rev¬enue from students totaled $2,533,460,or 23% of the aggregate income fromall sources. But beginning with July1, 1941, a decline in registration hasoccurred, largely the result of thedraft and other defense activities.This decline in number of students,which has occurred in practically allAmerican colleges and universities,will seriously affect academic budgets,Mr. Daines points out.“One bright light looms in the tan¬gible evidences of loyalty and appreci¬ation manifested during the observ¬ance of the Fiftieth Anniversary, thegenerous responses of the citizens ofChicago and the alumni have beenmost gratifying. The University isgrateful indeed for this munificent andwholehearted support.“What the University now needsand will continue to need is a host ofloyal friends who will support itthrough regular annual giving. Toprovide the greatest benefit, such con¬tributions should not be restricted.“The major problem now confront¬ing the University is not expansionbut the maintenance of its activitiesat their present level of excellence.rilTEREDSMOKINGGENUINE nnm for medico msPMDtED ONLY IN THIS RED G BUCK BOX >66 Baffle Filter whirl-cools smoke; traps juices, flakesand nicotine in pipes, cigarette and cigar holders.nNKST BmAR MONBY CAN BUYMackieDrinksHereRobert M. Mackie, executive secre¬tary of the World’s Student Chris¬tian Federation, will be a guest oncampus Thursday, November 27. Agroup of students have been invitedto meet him at a tea at the home ofRobert Mackie. . . with GilkeysDean and Mrs. Gilkey from 3:30 to5:30 that afternoon.Membership of the World’s StudentChristian Association is made up ofstudent religious organizationthroughout the world. “It is a world¬wide fellowship of Christian studentsdoing pioneer work by maintainingForumHearsMcGuireWith John L. Lewis, the UnitedMine Workers, and the strike ques¬tion raging up and down the editorialpages of the nation, the University’sStudent Forum will hear ChristineMcGuire, instructor in the social sci¬ences in the College, report on “TheLabor Problem” today, at 3:30, inLexington 5.An open discussion will follow MissMcGuire’s speech. The meeting is o-pen to everyone, with emphasis plac¬ed on the attendance of those intrest-ed in formal debate. The Student For¬um will soon select its debaters forthe regular debating season. Fromthese regular platform orators, theForum leaders, under the direction ofBill Bradbury, will choose the personsthat will represent the University atthe Western Conference Tourney.and deepening their unity in themidst of a world conflict, workingwith international conferences, sup¬plying printed information, and ad¬ministering relief to students in thewar torn countries of Europe and theFar East.HEADING FOR HOME?Start right and easy! Send yourluggage round-trip by trusty, low-cost Railway Express, and takeyour train with peace of mind.Wepick-up and deliver, remember,at no extra charge within our reg¬ular vehicle limits in all cities andprincipal towns. You merely phoneRailwa^&ExpressAOBNCY^'^P^ INC.v:ATION-WIDE RAIL-AIR SERVICEFREE DELIVERYBOUnONIERE FREEM 1 T Z 1 Elor your I^F corsagesMIDWAY 4020-4021 1301 E. 55thHYDE PARKRENT-A-CARSYSTEMNew De Luxe Plymoufhs, Radio and Heater Low Self Adjusting Ratesfor Pleasure, Business, Vacation, Weddings & FuneralsSpecial pommercial and Long Trip Rates Trips as Low as 3c per MileDRIVE YOURSELFNO MINIMUM GUA'RANTEE5330 LAKE PARK AVE. CHICAGO PHONE PLAZA 339709SHOW BOATSaratoga TrunkPrice $2.50Just Published!GIVE BOOKS THIS— CHRISTMAS —some suggestionsBromfield—Wild is the River $2.50Chase—Wind Swept 2.75Wolfe—The Hills Beyond 2.50VanPassen—That Day Alone 3.75Gunther—Inside Latin America 3.50Collected SonnetsEdna St. Vincent Millay 3.00Adley—A Dialectic of Morals 1.80MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE IDEAL CHRISTMASGIFTS. ORDERS SHOULD BE PLACED NOW.GIFT CARDS FREE.WOODWORTH'SROOK STORE1311 E. 57th St. — Open EveningsTHE DAILY MAROON, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941Page ThreeSocialistReviewTonightTonight’s book review round-table,first of three of its kind to be held onsuccessive Wednesdays under the di¬rection of the University SocialistClub, will include Professors Frank H.Knight, Oskar Lange, and EdwardShils of the division of the social sci¬ences, it was announced yesterday.The round table is scheduled to con¬vene in Social Science 105 at 7:30.Piscussuants Knight, Lange, andShils will confine their remarks toJames Burnham’s book, The Mana¬gerial Revolution. Burnham’s latestwork has caused considerable commentin social and political circles for itsinsight into contemporary trends.Professor Knight of the economicsdepartment is co-editor of the Journalof Political Economy and recently pre¬sented two symposium papers duringThe University’s Fiftieth anniversary.The dissertations were written for thedejiartments of philosophy and eco¬nomics.Lange is research associate for theCowles commission in the departmentof economics and is also associateprofessor. Shils, who will open discus¬sion on The Managerial Revolutionthis evening with a brief resume ofthe book’s theme, is instructor in thesocial sciences of the College,Remaining publications to be dis¬cussed in the three-book series will bethe Dean of Canterbury’s The SovietRower, A Socialist Sixth of the World,and a pamphlet published by the Na¬tional Resources Commission entitled“After Defense—What?” Participantsfor these subsequent Wednesday nightsessions have not yet been selected.Feature of the book review serieswill be that each book will be surveyedfrom various angles and no particularideas or opinions will be emphasized.YWCAFinanceDrive OnTo help support their activities forthe year, the Y.W.C.A. is promotingtheir annual finance drive, during theperiod of November 24 to December3. Scope of this year’s program, forwhich disbursements from the treas¬ury of the organization are made, in¬clude service projects, conferences, theNational Student Council, educationalwork, and campus functions.Contributions to the fund can begiven to any cabinet member. Therewill also be tables in Ida Noyes, Man-del Hall, and Cobb Hall.Heading the Young Women’s Chris¬tian Association of the University arethe Junior and Senior Cabinets, Mar¬jorie Woodrich, president of Y.W.C.A.,acts as chairman to the Senior Cabi¬net, composed of Peggy Zimmer, vice-president, Caroline Allen, secretary,Joan Augustus, treasurer, MildredReese, Margot Faust, Louise Kachel,Louise Cummins, Phyllis Richards,Shirley Borman, Betsy Kuh, Jean Car¬gill, Violet Escarraz, Janet Wagner,and Dorothy Meier.Chairmanship of the Junior CabinetCzech—(Continued from page one)Camera ClubAn opportunity to make theirown Christmas cards is being of¬fered to all the members of the In¬ternational House (Camera Club,("omplete equipment will be avail¬able at the meeting which the Clubis holding tonight at 7:30 in roomR at International housewas at its hottest. So we began nego¬tiations with an Argentine companyto have a boat come over for us. Themoney was all collected when therewas a new official announcement. Wewere to return to Casablanca in Mor¬occo and from there cross the ocean toMartinique. Arriving at Casablanca,we learned that Martinique was im¬possible and in three days, everyonewas insde an African concentrationcamp. Here we must be kept until wewere able to leave the country.”Catching a tropical fever and hav¬ing his visa expire were just,inciden¬tal matters to the main difficulty offinding a boat to the Americas. Finallyin September, a Portuguese ship boundfor New York made a call at Casa¬blanca and Hercik was able to securepassage. He arrived in the UnitedStates without further mishap exceptthat the British Authorities at Ber¬muda confiscated some of his notesand documents.SchedulePicturesFor ClubsFirst of the girls’ club pictures forCap and Gown will be taken today inIda Noyes by the De Haven Studios.The schedule for photographs will in¬clude one or two clubs each week dayfrom now until December 9.Pictures will be taken individuallyat ten minute intervals. The studiowill work in Room C from 9-12 andfrom 1-4. Schedules for each club willbe posted at club meetings by Cap andGown.The daily schedule follows:Wednesday, Nov. 26—Pi Delta PhiThursday, Nov. 27—Chi Rho SigmaFriday, Nov. 28—Morning—Alpha Chi ThetaAfternoon—Phi Beta DeltaMonday, Dec. 1—EsotericTuesday, Dec. 2—QuadranglerWednesday, Dec. 3—Mortar BoardThursday, Dec. 4—SigmaFriday, Dec. 5—Morning—Alpha EpsilonAfternoon—TriotaMonday, Dec. 8—WyvernTuesday, Dec. 9—Morning—Delta SigmaAfternoon—W y vernWednesday, Dec. 10—Morning—Pi Delta UpsilonAfternoon—Tau Sigma Upsilonis taken over by the vice-president ofthe “Y”. This cabinet consists ofCharlotte Allen, Mary Bogie, AnnabelBrown, Mary Elisabeth Davis, AudreyEarl, Harriet Eaton, Donis Fisher,Barbara Gilfillan, Lois Merker, CarolMiller, Lucille Peterson, Shirley Pet¬erson, Miriam Petty, Zipporah Potten-ger, Betty Schroder, and Ann Gardi¬ner.Offering an opportunity for discus¬sion of essential values for living, forpersonal counselling, recreation, fel¬lowship, and the development of lead¬ership qualities, the Y.W.C.A. hasattracted many new members. Theycontribute to the United Service Or¬ganizations, the National StudentCouncil, and the World Student Serv¬ice Fund. Besides being affiliated withthe National Y.W.C.A. they belong tothe World’s Student Christian Federa¬tion.-Financial Report-Emphasizes Double Financial'^Squeeze^^ Facing UniversityNow financial problems facing theprivately endowed universities andcolleges of the country are emphasizedin the annual financial report of theUniversity issued Saturday by HarveyC. Daines, comptroller.The University is still strugglingwith the major readjustments necessi¬tated by the depression-born declinein return from investments. It is nowconfronted with another major“.squeeze”, a reduction in student rev¬enues through operation of the Se¬lective Service Act and other defenseniea.sures, and the rising operatingcosts for supplies and non-academicwages and salaries.“That an enhancement of dividendson stock holdings will counterbalancethe effect of this double ‘squeeze’ isdubious, due to restrictions on cor¬porate earnings through governmentprice control and high income and ex¬cess profit taxes,” Mr. Daines says.“This added pressure on a budgetwhich has been highly compressed formore than a decade suggests a mostprecarious future.”The report which covers the fiscalyear 1940-1941 ending June 30, 1941shows the gross operating income ofthe University aggregated $10, 929,256for the year, against gross expendi¬tures of $10,826,767; the $102,489 ex¬cess was restricted income. But thegross income included consumable giftsof $1,675,477, or 14.3%, of which $979,-507 consisted of special gifts receivedin prior years which were applied tosupport the 1940-41 operations.Rate of return on the average bal¬ances of endowment funds was 4.24%compared with 4.17% in 1939-40 and6.2%, in 1929-30.Mr. Daines points out that “thisreduction of 1.96% is equivalent to adecline of 32% in rate of return or$1,435,819 in annual income if appliedto the present endowment.”At the close of the fiscal year thetotal assets owned amounted to $128,-781,040, an enhancement of $1,175,422during the year. Of the total, $73,320,-043 was in endowment, an increase of$750,855, and $44,619,015 had been in¬vested in plant and equipment. Thebalance is distributed under the cat¬egories of general, loan, and annuityfunds.Market value of all investmentswas 3.9% less than the book value of$76,932,176. The diversification of in¬vestment was as follows: Bonds,27.9% preferred stocks, 9.8%; com¬mon stocks, 28.1%; real estate, mort¬gages, and real estate contracts,33.7%; sundry, .5%.During the year, gifts paid in forall purposes amounted to $3,307,498of which $1,843,334 was for endow-men, $456,652 was unrestricted, andthe balance restricted in some man¬ner. During the two years ended June30, 1941, the University receivedpledges of $8,671,307, of which $5,-504,012 was credited to the FiftiethAnniversary Fund. Contributions oftrustees during this period amountedto $1,800,405. jDuring the last fiscal year 11,897students were enrolled, an increase of2% over the previous year. The rev¬enue from students totaled $2,533,460,or 23% of the aggregate income fromall sources. But beginning with July1, 1941, a decline in registration hasoccurred, largely the result of thedraft and other defense activities.This decline in number of students,which has occurred in practically allAmerican colleges and universities,will seriously affect academic budgets,Mr. Daines points out.“One bright light looms in the tan¬gible evidences of loyalty and appreci¬ation manifested during the observ¬ance of the Fiftieth Anniversary, thegenerous responses of the citizens ofChicago and the alumni have beenmost gratifying. The University isgrateful indeed for this munificent andwholehearted support.“What the University now needsand will continue to need is a host ofloyal friends who will support itthrough regular annual giving. Toprovide the greatest benefit, such con¬tributions should not be restricted.“The major problem now confront¬ing the University is not expansionbut the maintenance of its activitiesat their present level of excellence.rilTEREDSMOKINGGENUINE nnm for medico msPMDtED ONLY IN THIS RED G BUCK BOX >66 Baffle Filter whirl-cools smoke; traps juices, flakesand nicotine in pipes, cigarette and cigar holders.nNKST BmAR MONBY CAN BUYMackieDrinksHereRobert M. Mackie, executive secre¬tary of the World’s Student Chris¬tian Federation, will be a guest oncampus Thursday, November 27. Agroup of students have been invitedto meet him at a tea at the home ofRobert Mackie. . . with GilkeysDean and Mrs. Gilkey from 3:30 to5:30 that afternoon.Membership of the World’s StudentChristian Association is made up ofstudent religious organizationthroughout the world. “It is a world¬wide fellowship of Christian studentsdoing pioneer work by maintainingForumHearsMcGuireWith John L. Lewis, the UnitedMine Workers, and the strike ques¬tion raging up and down the editorialpages of the nation, the University’sStudent Forum will hear ChristineMcGuire, instructor in the social sci¬ences in the College, report on “TheLabor Problem” today, at 3:30, inLexington 5.An open discussion will follow MissMcGuire’s speech. The meeting is o-pen to everyone, with emphasis plac¬ed on the attendance of those intrest-ed in formal debate. The Student For¬um will soon select its debaters forthe regular debating season. Fromthese regular platform orators, theForum leaders, under the direction ofBill Bradbury, will choose the personsthat will represent the University atthe Western Conference Tourney.and deepening their unity in themidst of a world conflict, workingwith international conferences, sup¬plying printed information, and ad¬ministering relief to students in thewar torn countries of Europe and theFar East.HEADING FOR HOME?Start right and easy! Send yourluggage round-trip by trusty, low-cost Railway Express, and takeyour train with peace of mind.Wepick-up and deliver, remember,at no extra charge within our reg¬ular vehicle limits in all cities andprincipal towns. You merely phoneRailwa^&ExpressAOBNCY^'^P^ INC.v:ATION-WIDE RAIL-AIR SERVICEFREE DELIVERYBOUnONIERE FREEM 1 T Z 1 Elor your I^F corsagesMIDWAY 4020-4021 1301 E. 55thHYDE PARKRENT-A-CARSYSTEMNew De Luxe Plymoufhs, Radio and Heater Low Self Adjusting Ratesfor Pleasure, Business, Vacation, Weddings & FuneralsSpecial pommercial and Long Trip Rates Trips as Low as 3c per MileDRIVE YOURSELFNO MINIMUM GUA'RANTEE5330 LAKE PARK AVE. CHICAGO PHONE PLAZA 339709SHOW BOATSaratoga TrunkPrice $2.50Just Published!GIVE BOOKS THIS— CHRISTMAS —some suggestionsBromfield—Wild is the River $2.50Chase—Wind Swept 2.75Wolfe—The Hills Beyond 2.50VanPassen—That Day Alone 3.75Gunther—Inside Latin America 3.50Collected SonnetsEdna St. Vincent Millay 3.00Adley—A Dialectic of Morals 1.80MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE IDEAL CHRISTMASGIFTS. ORDERS SHOULD BE PLACED NOW.GIFT CARDS FREE.WOODWORTH'SROOK STORE1311 E. 57th St. — Open EveningsPage FourTHE DAILY MAROON. WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941DISTINCTIVE MODELSSUITING EVERYPREFERENCE. FILTERMAKES PIPE FUNCTION^ SUPERBLY AIndians Defeat Red Devils27-20 For Six-Man TitleMahoney Runs 65 yds.In Final Minutes ToMake Winning ScoreBy JOHN GUGICHIn a surprising victory at Staggfield yesterday, the second place In¬dians defeated the first place RedDevils, defending champions, for thesix-man title, by a narrow margin of27-20 on a field that was coated thick¬ly with mud. Tom Mahoney, fleet In¬dian halfback, made the decisive playin the closing minutes of the gamewhen he eluded the entire Devil teamand ran 65 yards down the watery fieldfor the winning touchdown. HenryMelin converted by catching a passfrom Bob Riley in the end zone.Making the first touchdown midwaythrough the first half, Mahoney of theIndians went over on a line buck. Hethen made the conversion on an endrun. The first Devil score was madeon a long pass from Duke Harlan toGeorge Balia who ran 10 yards intothe end zone for the score. The Devilswent into the lead when Harlan dropkicked for the conversion.Melin Receives in the End ZoneComing back immediately to de¬molish the Devils’ lead. Hank Melincaught a pass from Bob Riley in theend zone. Harlan made use of hisunique ability to evade would-be tack-lers by running 40 yards down thefield for the marker. Melin, behind abeautiful running interference, ran 30yards to a touchdown, to again put histeam in front of the Satan aggrega¬tion. Mahoney aided the cause by con¬verting on a line buck.Fighting desperately, the Red Dev¬ils moved up the field slowly, finallybringing the ball up to the Indians’two yard stripe. Gene Johnson scoredthe touchdown on a plunge throughcenter to tie the ball game.Frantically fighting against the rac¬ing scourge of time, the Indians re¬ceived the ball on the kickoff from-the Red Devils on their own 15 yardline. With the sidelines hushed on thenext play, Tom Mahoney broke loosefor his deciding run down the fieldthat brought the second annual cham¬pionship to the Indian team.Devils Handicapped by MudThe Red Devils, who were onlybeaten once in the tournament series,were visibly handicapped by the mud¬dy condition of the field. Added tothis, they were also at a disadvantagefrom the standpoint of weight. BobCummins, Satan 210 pound back-fieldman, who had been their main¬stay during the tournament series,has been unable to play for the pastfew weeks because of a broken thumb.Ever since his absence from the line¬up, the team has not shown the ag¬gressiveness that was characteristic ofit.Ray RandallJack Fansmeet the athleteSWIMMERSCoach McGillvray has called ameeting of the members of theswimmi||flR|pam for this afternoon.All varsity members are asked tobe in coach’s office, Bartlett Pool,at 4:30.Indoor TrackMen Preparestarts practicingLatest promise of a successfultrack season is the recent appoint¬ment of Joe Novak as assistant totrack coach Ned Merriam. Coming tothe Maroons from Wright Junior Col¬lege, Novak yesterday began work bylooking over the crop competing infield events, his specialty.Indoor track practlc opened yester¬day, with the squad taking advantageof the field house track for the firsttime this year. Many fine lettermenare returning this season amongwhom are Trudy Dahlberg, Ray Ran¬dall, Howard Winkleman, John Leg-gitt, and sophomores Bud Tozer, Nor¬man Barker, and Harry Roberts whowill be hard combinations to beat inthe longer distances. Warren Wilner,a senior “C” man, is a product of theMaroon coaching staff, having had noprevious experience. He has develop¬ed into one of the leading Big Ten 440men.Shanken’s Pole VaultA1 Rider, only weight man out forthe team, would welcome some enthu¬siastic freshman competition for thejob. The Shanken twins, famous fortheir gymnastic ability, have decidedto try a hand at pole vaulting. Thesetwo men in addition to Bob Kincheloe,should make a steady triple threat.Don Marrow, another outstandingharrier, is expected to do big thingsbecause of the much Improved condi¬tion of his legs.Although the regular indoor trackseason will not officially open until themiddle of January, Coach Merriam isexpecting to schedule a practicemeet sometime next month.Meet TheAthleteJack FonsQuiet and conscientious are two ad¬jectives rarely applied to an athletebut Jack Fons can be called both. Tall,dark, mild-mannered Fons is actingcaptain of the basketball team andmainstay of the baseball team. No onewould think of calling him a “natural”athlete but his three year record forthe Maroon and his sojourn in highschool stand in mute testimony to hisachievements.In Hirsch High School his SouthSide scoring record paced the basket¬ball team to the semi-finals of the cityleague while he led the baseball ninein batting and played a consistent, ifnot sparkling, outfield. He found ithard to choose between Wisconsin andChicago after graduating but finallypicked the Midway as the best placeto get a general education and pursuehis favorite study, chemistry.Letters as a SophomoreIn his sophomore year, Fons madehis old English C in basketball andplayed third base for the last five en¬counters of the baseball team. Lastyear Fons grew to the height of 6feet 2 which increased his effective¬ness on the basketball court to the ex¬tent of finishing second only to JoeStampf’s record-breaking total score.But more valuable to the teaip thanhis individual scoring was the all-around aggressiveness and steady playthat marked him as one of the fewbright rays in an otherwise gloomyseason.Enthusiastic About TeamFons is more than enthusia.sticabout the prospects for this yearsfive. The return of forwards Ed Nel¬son and himself promise an improvedscoring punch along with the sopho¬mores who acquitted themselves wellin their role as scrubs. When askedabout prospects for the coming base¬ball team, Fons could not be reachedfor comment.Bruce SmithStamp! PlaysOn All-StarsJoe Stampf, captain of last year’sMaroon five is scheduled to make hislast appearance as a collegiate in thegame between the College All-Starsand the Oshkosh National BasketballLeague champions Friday evening.The contest will take place in the Chi¬cago Stadium before a crowd of 22,-000.Playng center for the Maroons,Stampf, a member of Sigma Chi, wonthe Big Ten scoring title last season.In the game Joe will be playing withGene Englund of Wisconsin, his clos¬est competitor in the scoring race.Stampf was originally scheduledfor a starting position but blisterswhich have developed on his feet inthe last few days may keep him onthe sidelines at the opening whisttle.Featured with the All-Star gamewill be a tussle between the ChicagoBruins and the famous New YorkRenaissance. Tickets are selling from$.55 up.Cagers EmployNew SystemJoe Stampf. . All-Conference StarAsserting, “We may, just may, leadthe second division this year,” tall,intensive Jack Fons threw a ray ofhope into the basketball outlook forthe impending season when interview¬ed just aftter he withdrew from aheated scrimmage with the freshmenyesterday. Acting Captain Jack Fonsstated that the cagers are employinga new system which calls for offens¬ive tactics on the defensive and whichhe expects to make possible the inter¬ception of more than a modicum ofthe opponent’s passes.In the heated scrimmage yesterdayboth the freshmen and the varsitydisplayed gameness and fight, but al¬so more than a little ragged play,neither team sinking more than avery small portion of their attemptedshots at the basket.The freshmen during the early min¬utes of the scrimmage threw up aneffective defense under the hoop, butlater the varsity began pouring themin with not too much effort. As onesideline commentator said, “thefirst freshman five is a potent con¬gregation, but the squad is lacking incapable reserves.” First year men Ell-man and Nagy are both smooth ballhandlers and should prove bother¬some to the varsity boys in practicesessions.All-StarsBernie Bierman, coach of Min¬nesota’s Golden Gophers, againchampions of the Western Confer¬ence, has announced his choice ofthe 1941 All-Conference team:L.E. Schreiner—WisconsinL.T. Wildung—MinnesotaL.G. Levy—MinnesotaC. Ingalls—MichiganR.G. Howard—Ohio StateR.T. Bauman—NorthwesternR.E. Fitch—MinnesotaQ.B. Hillenbrand—IndianaL.H. Smith—MinnesotaR.H. Westifall—MichiganF.B. Daley—Minnesota. last college gameThe Dramatic Association willhold another tea for its membersand friends on Thursday from :L45-4:45.These gifts byLucien Lelong saythat to her .,. shesays that to yjouwhen she sees them!• "Opening Night” Perfumemakes its bow in a new size.There'll be applause—and ad¬miration—when she gets it.12.50• "Balalaika” Cologne is oneof the grandest colognes she'sever us^. A lovely lasting fra¬grance like a bouquet. 11.50[f you want a thoughtful gift,send "Indiscrete*^ DustingPowder by Lucien Lelong. Sorich, so useful, so very luxuri¬ous . . . she’ll be grateful al¬ways. |2U. of C. Bookstore5802 Ellis Ave.Page FourTHE DAILY MAROON. WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 26. 1941DISTINCTIVE MODELSSUITING EVERYPREFERENCE. FILTERMAKES PIPE FUNCTION^ SUPERBLY AIndians Defeat Red Devils27-20 For Six-Man TitleMahoney Runs 65 yds.In Final Minutes ToMake Winning ScoreBy JOHN GUGICHIn a surprising victory at Staggfield yesterday, the second place In¬dians defeated the first place RedDevils, defending champions, for thesix-man title, by a narrow margin of27-20 on a field that was coated thick¬ly with mud. Tom Mahoney, fleet In¬dian halfback, made the decisive playin the closing minutes of the gamewhen he eluded the entire Devil teamand ran 65 yards down the watery fieldfor the winning touchdown. HenryMelin converted by catching a passfrom Bob Riley in the end zone.Making the first touchdown midwaythrough the first half, Mahoney of theIndians went over on a line buck. Hethen made the conversion on an endrun. The first Devil score was madeon a long pass from Duke Harlan toGeorge Balia who ran 10 yards intothe end zone for the score. The Devilswent into the lead when Harlan dropkicked for the conversion.Melin Receives in the End ZoneComing back immediately to de¬molish the Devils’ lead. Hank Melincaught a pass from Bob Riley in theend zone. Harlan made use of hisunique ability to evade would-be tack-lers by running 40 yards down thefield for the marker. Melin, behind abeautiful running interference, ran 30yards to a touchdown, to again put histeam in front of the Satan aggrega¬tion. Mahoney aided the cause by con¬verting on a line buck.Fighting desperately, the Red Dev¬ils moved up the field slowly, finallybringing the ball up to the Indians’two yard stripe. Gene Johnson scoredthe touchdown on a plunge throughcenter to tie the ball game.Frantically fighting against the rac¬ing scourge of time, the Indians re¬ceived the ball on the kickoff from-the Red Devils on their own 15 yardline. With the sidelines hushed on thenext play, Tom Mahoney broke loosefor his deciding run down the fieldthat brought the second annual cham¬pionship to the Indian team.Devils Handicapped by MudThe Red Devils, who were onlybeaten once in the tournament series,were visibly handicapped by the mud¬dy condition of the field. Added tothis, they were also at a disadvantagefrom the standpoint of weight. BobCummins, Satan 210 pound back-fieldman, who had been their main¬stay during the tournament series,has been unable to play for the pastfew weeks because of a broken thumb.Ever since his absence from the line¬up, the team has not shown the ag¬gressiveness that was characteristic ofit.Ray RandallJack Fansmeet the athleteSWIMMERSCoach McGillvray has called ameeting of the members of theswimmi||flR|pam for this afternoon.All varsity members are asked tobe in coach’s office, Bartlett Pool,at 4:30.Indoor TrackMen Preparestarts practicingLatest promise of a successfultrack season is the recent appoint¬ment of Joe Novak as assistant totrack coach Ned Merriam. Coming tothe Maroons from Wright Junior Col¬lege, Novak yesterday began work bylooking over the crop competing infield events, his specialty.Indoor track practlc opened yester¬day, with the squad taking advantageof the field house track for the firsttime this year. Many fine lettermenare returning this season amongwhom are Trudy Dahlberg, Ray Ran¬dall, Howard Winkleman, John Leg-gitt, and sophomores Bud Tozer, Nor¬man Barker, and Harry Roberts whowill be hard combinations to beat inthe longer distances. Warren Wilner,a senior “C” man, is a product of theMaroon coaching staff, having had noprevious experience. He has develop¬ed into one of the leading Big Ten 440men.Shanken’s Pole VaultA1 Rider, only weight man out forthe team, would welcome some enthu¬siastic freshman competition for thejob. The Shanken twins, famous fortheir gymnastic ability, have decidedto try a hand at pole vaulting. Thesetwo men in addition to Bob Kincheloe,should make a steady triple threat.Don Marrow, another outstandingharrier, is expected to do big thingsbecause of the much Improved condi¬tion of his legs.Although the regular indoor trackseason will not officially open until themiddle of January, Coach Merriam isexpecting to schedule a practicemeet sometime next month.Meet TheAthleteJack FonsQuiet and conscientious are two ad¬jectives rarely applied to an athletebut Jack Fons can be called both. Tall,dark, mild-mannered Fons is actingcaptain of the basketball team andmainstay of the baseball team. No onewould think of calling him a “natural”athlete but his three year record forthe Maroon and his sojourn in highschool stand in mute testimony to hisachievements.In Hirsch High School his SouthSide scoring record paced the basket¬ball team to the semi-finals of the cityleague while he led the baseball ninein batting and played a consistent, ifnot sparkling, outfield. He found ithard to choose between Wisconsin andChicago after graduating but finallypicked the Midway as the best placeto get a general education and pursuehis favorite study, chemistry.Letters as a SophomoreIn his sophomore year, Fons madehis old English C in basketball andplayed third base for the last five en¬counters of the baseball team. Lastyear Fons grew to the height of 6feet 2 which increased his effective¬ness on the basketball court to the ex¬tent of finishing second only to JoeStampf’s record-breaking total score.But more valuable to the teaip thanhis individual scoring was the all-around aggressiveness and steady playthat marked him as one of the fewbright rays in an otherwise gloomyseason.Enthusiastic About TeamFons is more than enthusia.sticabout the prospects for this yearsfive. The return of forwards Ed Nel¬son and himself promise an improvedscoring punch along with the sopho¬mores who acquitted themselves wellin their role as scrubs. When askedabout prospects for the coming base¬ball team, Fons could not be reachedfor comment.Bruce SmithStamp! PlaysOn All-StarsJoe Stampf, captain of last year’sMaroon five is scheduled to make hislast appearance as a collegiate in thegame between the College All-Starsand the Oshkosh National BasketballLeague champions Friday evening.The contest will take place in the Chi¬cago Stadium before a crowd of 22,-000.Playng center for the Maroons,Stampf, a member of Sigma Chi, wonthe Big Ten scoring title last season.In the game Joe will be playing withGene Englund of Wisconsin, his clos¬est competitor in the scoring race.Stampf was originally scheduledfor a starting position but blisterswhich have developed on his feet inthe last few days may keep him onthe sidelines at the opening whisttle.Featured with the All-Star gamewill be a tussle between the ChicagoBruins and the famous New YorkRenaissance. Tickets are selling from$.55 up.Cagers EmployNew SystemJoe Stampf. . All-Conference StarAsserting, “We may, just may, leadthe second division this year,” tall,intensive Jack Fons threw a ray ofhope into the basketball outlook forthe impending season when interview¬ed just aftter he withdrew from aheated scrimmage with the freshmenyesterday. Acting Captain Jack Fonsstated that the cagers are employinga new system which calls for offens¬ive tactics on the defensive and whichhe expects to make possible the inter¬ception of more than a modicum ofthe opponent’s passes.In the heated scrimmage yesterdayboth the freshmen and the varsitydisplayed gameness and fight, but al¬so more than a little ragged play,neither team sinking more than avery small portion of their attemptedshots at the basket.The freshmen during the early min¬utes of the scrimmage threw up aneffective defense under the hoop, butlater the varsity began pouring themin with not too much effort. As onesideline commentator said, “thefirst freshman five is a potent con¬gregation, but the squad is lacking incapable reserves.” First year men Ell-man and Nagy are both smooth ballhandlers and should prove bother¬some to the varsity boys in practicesessions.All-StarsBernie Bierman, coach of Min¬nesota’s Golden Gophers, againchampions of the Western Confer¬ence, has announced his choice ofthe 1941 All-Conference team:L.E. Schreiner—WisconsinL.T. Wildung—MinnesotaL.G. Levy—MinnesotaC. Ingalls—MichiganR.G. Howard—Ohio StateR.T. Bauman—NorthwesternR.E. Fitch—MinnesotaQ.B. Hillenbrand—IndianaL.H. Smith—MinnesotaR.H. Westifall—MichiganF.B. Daley—Minnesota. last college gameThe Dramatic Association willhold another tea for its membersand friends on Thursday from :L45-4:45.These gifts byLucien Lelong saythat to her .,. shesays that to yjouwhen she sees them!• "Opening Night” Perfumemakes its bow in a new size.There'll be applause—and ad¬miration—when she gets it.12.50• "Balalaika” Cologne is oneof the grandest colognes she'sever us^. A lovely lasting fra¬grance like a bouquet. 11.50[f you want a thoughtful gift,send "Indiscrete*^ DustingPowder by Lucien Lelong. Sorich, so useful, so very luxuri¬ous . . . she’ll be grateful al¬ways. |2U. of C. Bookstore5802 Ellis Ave.