Period B. R,H UTCHI NS SPEAKS AT CONVOCATIONifrv ^ <* ^ ft * >s*jj * ' ■«■■■>The University of Chicago's first half century of life will reach a climax Tuesday with the graduation of over 700students. In its brief life span the University has risen from a small school sunk in the plains of the Mid-West to oneof the outstanding centers of intellectual achievement in the world.In its second fifty years it faces two trying problems, first of maintaining its scholarly position in the face ofwidespread economic disturbances and, second, preventing the trend toward an American fascism. If it fulfills thesetwo tasks its future gains will be even more important than the progress it has achieved in its five decades of existence.University Rallies For Thirty-firstAnnual Inter-Fraternity Sing TomorrowStudents, faculty, and friends willmeet tomorrow night, for the 31stInterfraternity Sing. First and mostimportant event on the program willbe the competition between the Uni¬versity's 16 fraternities for the twoprizes, the quality cup and the quan¬tity cup.The fraternities will compete in thefollowing order:Kappa Alpha PsiPhi KAppa SigmaPi Lambda PhiZeta Beta TauChi PsiAlpha Delta PhiPhi Sigma DeltaFor the first time in the sing’s his-Phi Kappa Psitory a women’s club will performSigma Chiwhen Esoteric, winner of this year’sDelta UpsilonInterclub Sing, will repeat the songsBeta Theta Pithat brought them victory.Kappa SigmaThe second event of major im-Psi Upsilonportance will be the presenting of thePhi Gamma DeltaAides and Marshals for 1941-42. Fol-Delta Kappa Epsilonlowing the induction of the new stu-Phi Delta Thetadent officials, the singing awards willbe announced and “C” Blankets willbe given to outstanding athletes.One of the University’s most an¬cient traditions seems to stand somechance of being broken for there isat least a possibility that rain willfall the night of the Sing. Accordingto the weather bureau there is athunder storm area moving towardthe city which should reach us in thelate afternoon or early evening ofSaturday.AwardJOODegreesTuesdayMore than seven hundred studentswhose home towns range from Abak,Nigeria, in West Africa to Iron River,Mich., will receive degrees Tuesdaymorning and afternoon in RockefellerMemorial Chapel at the 204th Convo¬cation.Candidates will hear President Rob¬ert M. Hutchins deliver the annualconvocation address. The title andsubject traditionally are not announc¬ed beforehand. Admission to the con¬vocation is by ticket only.Over three hundred higher degreeswill be awarded at the morning ses¬sion, scheduled for 11 a.m. More thanfour hundred Bachelor’s degrees willbe awarded at the afternoon session,which starts at 3 p.m.59 Ph.D’sApproximately 426 candidates willreceive the Bachelor’s degree, 145 theMaster’s, nine the M.B.A., three theD.B., 43 the J.D., 89 the M.D., and 59the Ph.D. degree. Of the 89 M.D.’s,60 are from Rush graduate School ofMedicine.Daughters of professors receivingdegrees include Prudence Coulter,daughter of Merle C. Coulter, profes¬sor of botany, who will receive theBachelor’s diploma in the biologicalsciences, and Caroline and CynthiaGrabo, daughters of Carl Grabo, as¬sociate professor of English. Carolinewill receive the Bachelor’s degree inthe humanities, and C3mthia the Mas¬ter’s degree in social science.Asuquo Udo IdiongAsuquo Udo Idiong is a candidatefor the Bachelor’s degree in the bi¬ological sciences. He attended theUniversity on a tribal grant from theIbio union in Nigeria, West Africa.Jesse Wilkins, brilliant student whoentered the University at the age of14, will receive the Master’s degree inmathmatics. He is 18.One professor—Earl S. Johnson,assistant professor of sociology—willreceive the Ph.D. degree in sociology.Charles Grace will become a Doctorof Medicine while his father andgrandfather, doctors also, look on.Grace plans to join his father andgrandfather’s office in Chillicothe, Mo.AnnounceNew Aides,MorsrtolsCharlotte Ford and Calvin Sawyierwill act as Senior Aide and StudentHead Marshal for 1941-42.Student Aides appointed by Pres¬ident Hutchins are Virginia LorraineAllen, Helen Anita Arnold, DorothyEinbecker, Shirley Laurene Latham,Ann Elizabeth Schroeder, NaomiViolet Smith, Dorothy Chase Teberg,Beverly Harriet Ward, and MarjorieMay Woodrich.The group of Student Marshalswill consist of Ronald Fuller Crane,Webb Sackett Fiser, Jacob LoganFox, Alan Peterson Graves, James J.McClure, Jr., Courtney David Shan-ken, Andrew Frank Stehney, ClaytonLars Traeger, and Raymond HerbertWittcoff.Miss Ford is the editor of Cap andGown, a Nu Pi Sigma, and a memberof Delta Sigma and the FederationBoard. Sawyier is captain and numberone man of the tennis team, as wellas a member of Owl and Serpent andAlpha Delta Phi.The new aides and marshals willbe inducted by President Hutchins atthe Inter-Fratemity Sing tomorrownight. The ceremony will begin at ap¬proximately 10, immediately after thesinging ends.Period B. R,H UTCHI NS SPEAKS AT CONVOCATIONifrv ^ <* ^ ft * >s*jj * ' ■«■■■>The University of Chicago's first half century of life will reach a climax Tuesday with the graduation of over 700students. In its brief life span the University has risen from a small school sunk in the plains of the Mid-West to oneof the outstanding centers of intellectual achievement in the world.In its second fifty years it faces two trying problems, first of maintaining its scholarly position in the face ofwidespread economic disturbances and, second, preventing the trend toward an American fascism. If it fulfills thesetwo tasks its future gains will be even more important than the progress it has achieved in its five decades of existence.University Rallies For Thirty-firstAnnual Inter-Fraternity Sing TomorrowStudents, faculty, and friends willmeet tomorrow night, for the 31stInterfraternity Sing. First and mostimportant event on the program willbe the competition between the Uni¬versity's 16 fraternities for the twoprizes, the quality cup and the quan¬tity cup.The fraternities will compete in thefollowing order:Kappa Alpha PsiPhi KAppa SigmaPi Lambda PhiZeta Beta TauChi PsiAlpha Delta PhiPhi Sigma DeltaFor the first time in the sing’s his-Phi Kappa Psitory a women’s club will performSigma Chiwhen Esoteric, winner of this year’sDelta UpsilonInterclub Sing, will repeat the songsBeta Theta Pithat brought them victory.Kappa SigmaThe second event of major im-Psi Upsilonportance will be the presenting of thePhi Gamma DeltaAides and Marshals for 1941-42. Fol-Delta Kappa Epsilonlowing the induction of the new stu-Phi Delta Thetadent officials, the singing awards willbe announced and “C” Blankets willbe given to outstanding athletes.One of the University’s most an¬cient traditions seems to stand somechance of being broken for there isat least a possibility that rain willfall the night of the Sing. Accordingto the weather bureau there is athunder storm area moving towardthe city which should reach us in thelate afternoon or early evening ofSaturday.AwardJOODegreesTuesdayMore than seven hundred studentswhose home towns range from Abak,Nigeria, in West Africa to Iron River,Mich., will receive degrees Tuesdaymorning and afternoon in RockefellerMemorial Chapel at the 204th Convo¬cation.Candidates will hear President Rob¬ert M. Hutchins deliver the annualconvocation address. The title andsubject traditionally are not announc¬ed beforehand. Admission to the con¬vocation is by ticket only.Over three hundred higher degreeswill be awarded at the morning ses¬sion, scheduled for 11 a.m. More thanfour hundred Bachelor’s degrees willbe awarded at the afternoon session,which starts at 3 p.m.59 Ph.D’sApproximately 426 candidates willreceive the Bachelor’s degree, 145 theMaster’s, nine the M.B.A., three theD.B., 43 the J.D., 89 the M.D., and 59the Ph.D. degree. Of the 89 M.D.’s,60 are from Rush graduate School ofMedicine.Daughters of professors receivingdegrees include Prudence Coulter,daughter of Merle C. Coulter, profes¬sor of botany, who will receive theBachelor’s diploma in the biologicalsciences, and Caroline and CynthiaGrabo, daughters of Carl Grabo, as¬sociate professor of English. Carolinewill receive the Bachelor’s degree inthe humanities, and C3mthia the Mas¬ter’s degree in social science.Asuquo Udo IdiongAsuquo Udo Idiong is a candidatefor the Bachelor’s degree in the bi¬ological sciences. He attended theUniversity on a tribal grant from theIbio union in Nigeria, West Africa.Jesse Wilkins, brilliant student whoentered the University at the age of14, will receive the Master’s degree inmathmatics. He is 18.One professor—Earl S. Johnson,assistant professor of sociology—willreceive the Ph.D. degree in sociology.Charles Grace will become a Doctorof Medicine while his father andgrandfather, doctors also, look on.Grace plans to join his father andgrandfather’s office in Chillicothe, Mo.AnnounceNew Aides,MorsrtolsCharlotte Ford and Calvin Sawyierwill act as Senior Aide and StudentHead Marshal for 1941-42.Student Aides appointed by Pres¬ident Hutchins are Virginia LorraineAllen, Helen Anita Arnold, DorothyEinbecker, Shirley Laurene Latham,Ann Elizabeth Schroeder, NaomiViolet Smith, Dorothy Chase Teberg,Beverly Harriet Ward, and MarjorieMay Woodrich.The group of Student Marshalswill consist of Ronald Fuller Crane,Webb Sackett Fiser, Jacob LoganFox, Alan Peterson Graves, James J.McClure, Jr., Courtney David Shan-ken, Andrew Frank Stehney, ClaytonLars Traeger, and Raymond HerbertWittcoff.Miss Ford is the editor of Cap andGown, a Nu Pi Sigma, and a memberof Delta Sigma and the FederationBoard. Sawyier is captain and numberone man of the tennis team, as wellas a member of Owl and Serpent andAlpha Delta Phi.The new aides and marshals willbe inducted by President Hutchins atthe Inter-Fratemity Sing tomorrownight. The ceremony will begin at ap¬proximately 10, immediately after thesinging ends.Page TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Convocation. 1941For two hours, the editorial writer has been sitting looking athis typewriter keys waiting for inspiration from above to tellhim what to say in his final contribution to the Daily Maroon.Nothing has happened, and he is beginning to fear that eithernothing exists Above or the Maroon is not worthy in the eyes ofGod to receive the lightning bolt of rhetorical truth.It falls to him then to frame his own message. But all that hecan think of are the messages he refuses to deliver because eitherthey are being repeated by hundreds of orators at convocationceremonies or because they are sonorous statements of beautifulunrealities or because they are both.Where Is Hope?He cannot say certainly and without qualification that “Whatwe have in America is hope”, because he is not certain that thefuture of America will be hopeful for a great many years to come,no matter which of the paths we choose today.He will not say, “Be strong, be brave” because so many peopleare shouting this to the youth already, and because so often, “bestrong” means “be intolerant” and “be brave” means to be ruth¬less. No one can teach the youth of the country bravery by rhet¬oric, and unless we can first demonstrate that we have somethingworth fighting for, true courage will not be achieved even in battle.He had thought to begin his editorial with Brahm’s resoundingecho of “We are young, therefore let us rejoice!” but he can seelittle for the youth to be joyous about in actual, bitter fact. Tobe young means to be eligible for the draft; to face a period ofmock shoddy prosperity and a longer, havoc-wreaking era ofdespondent depression; to look into uncertainty, struggle forsomething to hold on to in the face of an onrushing tidal wave, andvery probably to fail to find it.The Strong and the WeakEven the sage admonition to “keep your head and temper yourjudgment in this world gone mad” cannot be his message, althoughhe has often repeated it this year. He is now convinced that exceptfor a few strong souls who need not read his editorials to main¬tain their sanity, it is almost useless to preach a sermon that can¬not be heeded by the weak.Thus the ediorial writer finds himself in a dilemma. He willnot repeat what is being well- or ill-said to graduating classes atevery convocation ceremony in every section of the country. Hecannot repeat with confidence the high-sounding dicta which callus to battle, to “sanity,” to hope for he sees no victory, no wisdom,no happiness.“Advice”All that he can do is offer a distilled and rhetorically andartistically unsatisfactory fragment of advice. He can say only,“Graduates of 1941, it were better for you to accept calmly andresolutely the burdens you must bear, since only thus can youexpect to undo the awful things which are today being done; seekwhat can pass for happiness in such a way that you will add nofurther burdens to your heirs; don’t give up all optimism, if onlybecause you need something to maintain a will to live; bear as lit¬tle malice as you can toward those whose mistakes have causedour holocaust, and learn, if you can by their mistakes.”E. S. L.Traveling BazaarBy DICK HIMMELOur Last Good-bye... the last Bazaar of the year is us¬ually devoted to stories that have beenhushed up all year and then are finallyrevealed in a good Hearstian manner...this year as far as I can figure,we didn’t curb many exposes, sothere’s really nothing to reveal.Hello... It’s old news by now, but CynthiaDursema and Jimmy Murr are mar¬ried and have been that way sinceApril 19. The reason it all came toJohn Stevens. . . walks on waterlight was that Cyn bought a lot oflittle lace things for a trousseau andby a mistake the bill went home in¬stead of to her. Her mother was alittle anxious to know why she hadbought all these little lace things.When she found out, wedding an¬nouncements came out in fast order... Bob Mathews and Jean Woodwardare being married the 12th... BlancheGraver and Ed Middleton the 21st... Mary Margaret Mayer and BuffWoolams get hitched the 17th...JeanSkeels and Carl Ellison the 12th...Marjorie Schyltter, who got the topgrade on the English bachelors, mar¬ries her biologist the 11th...Who doyou know that’s getting married, likeLarry Traeger, without anyone know¬ing about it for days and days.Outstanding People ofthe YearPopularity queen of the year is alittle hard to determine, but ShirleeSmith was in there plugging, andplugging hard...Happy Bud Aronsontakes the cake for the best dressedman of the year . . . The friendliestsmile on campus Tom Murray White...Best couple of the year...JaneMoran and Clay Traeger . . . Bestdressed woman: Yvonne Markus (allof her)... Most unusual creature:Betty Boom Bloom... The May Queenof the Intellect, Mary MargueriteHammel... Ideal college youths . . .Henri Mahon, ’cause she’s pretty,smart, popular, nice and besides thatshe is sitting right next to me . . .And Johnny Stevens ’cause he has allthe qualities of Henrietta Mahon(and a Phi Bete key to boot—) ex¬cept he isn’t so pretty.. .Best imita¬tion of the year Nels Fuqua as JohnCrosby...Accent OnYouthFIFTH ROW CENTERBy Loren Flint“Weep No More’’ Sylvia Sidneyand Luther “Odets No More’’ Adlerhave deserted their usual Bronx inspired vehicles to appear at the Sel-wyn in Samuel Raphaelson’s comedy,“Accent on Youth’’, a play thatshocked audiences out of their seatssome six years ago on the stage andin the movies.The present production is LutherAdler’s show all the way through. Hemanages to make the show a kind ofpleasing summer evening’s enter¬tainment. That he was able to savethe show in the face of the low cal¬ibre of the supporting players is afurther tribute to the delightful act¬ing of Adler. Always he is convinc¬ing as the man of 53 in love with a22-year-old girl. Always he realizesa theatrical gag and makes the mostof it. Always he underplays in thescenes with Miss Sidney. Miss Sid¬ney is currently Mrs. Luther Adler.As the 22-year-old secretary-ac¬tress, Miss Sidney manages to keepfrom crying most of the time and looksvery well in her clothes. She is ham¬pered by a new color hair, called or¬ange. It is not so bad when she has itneatly combed, but in the third actshe whips out of a bedroom in a bath¬robe with her orange hair frizzedout to the limits. For a minute Ithought it was “Of Human Bondage’’.Her performance is very unimagin¬ative and it is always a happy thoughtwhen Mr. Adler comes back to savethe show.The only one in the supporting castwho manages to project anything atall is Kevin McCarthy, as the bodybeautiful boy. He has one scene withAdler which is the high comic spotof the show.The next-to-best glamour girl inin the show projects glamour byswishing on the stage, throwing herhead back, and letting the veins inher neck stick out. Some like it hot.Surprisingly enough the play isn’tterribly dated. It is less shocking aft¬er six years, but Raphaelson has awinsome charm about his plays thatmakes them enjoyable. The set wasratty looking, but nothing that agood coat of paint won’t clear up.It is Luther Adler’s show. It seems,however, that he might have found avehicle more worthy of his talents.7fie OoUli TfhAOOtiThe Dailr Maroon is the oflieial studentnewspaper of the University of Chicago, pub¬lished mornings except Saturday, Sunday, andMonday during the Autumn. Winter, andSpring quarters by The Daily Maroon Com¬pany, 6881 University avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:80 phone in stories to our printers.The Chief Printing Company, 148 West 62ndstreet. Telephones: Wentworth 6128 and 6124.llie University of Chicago assumes no re¬sponsibility for any statements appearing inThe Daily Maroon, or for any contract enteredinto by The Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves therights of publication of any material appear¬ing in this paper. Subscription rates: $8 ayear; 84 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Entered as second class matter March 18,1998, at the post office at Chicago, Illinois,under the act of March 8, 1879.Memberf^ssocioted Cblleftafe Pl-essDUtribulor ofGollebiate Di6estBOARD OP CONTROLWILLIAM HANKLA ERNEST LEISEBPEARL C. RUBINSJOHN P. STEVENS, ChairmanBusinessROBERT O’DONNELL. Business ManagerRobert Highman, Adv. Mgr.EDITORIAL A880CUTE8James Burtle, Mark Fisher, Robert Lawson,Richard Himmel, Daniel Mezlay, RichardPhilbrick, Robert D. Reynolds, and DanielWinograd. ,BUSINESS ASSOCIATESCHESTER SMITH, CirculationELLEN TUTTLE, Office Mgr.Richard Bolks, Wm. Van Horn. Myles Jarrow,Robert Precler, Edward L. RachlinNight Editors: John Stevens, Ernest Leiser,Mark Fisher, David Gottlieb and Dick HimmelCool Summer Roomsat HiePHI PSI HOUSEVery Reaionable RatesCall Chester Smith atPlata 7703 or Maroon OfficeIC-OIH'Then send youi baggage to ye old home¬stead by Railway Express and take yourtrain with peace of mind. We call anddeliver at no extra charge within ourregular vehicle limits in all cities andprincipal towns. Service is fast, econom¬ical—and sure as shootin’! Just phone^ RAILW^^i^I^PRESS ^A NATION-WIDE lAll-AIR SIRVICE AThis Summer at the SherryCOOL BREEZES DRIFTING ACROSS LAKE MICHIGANWILL MAKE DINING IN THE EXQUISITE FLORENTINE ROOMMOST PLEASANT DURING THE SUMMER.DISCRIMINATE UNIVERSITY PEOPLE CHOOSE THE QUIETSOPHISTICATION AND IMPECCABLE EXPERIENCED SERVICEOF 'THE SHERRY.’■"^^KcrrgFIFTY-THIRD STREET AT THE LAKECHICAGOCap and GownThe ’41 edition of Cap and Gownwill be ready for distribution June10th. Subscribers can receive theircopies at the Cap and Gown officein Lexington Hall.CLASSIFIEDTO SELL—Flowers, pipes and tobacco, andhotel entertainment duebills at slashedprices to liquidate accumulated asaets. SeeEllen Tuttle, Office Manager, Daily Ma¬roon business office—Lexington Hall.SPECIAL — Edgewater Beach Duebilla 29%off. Call at Business office Daily MaroonLex. Hall.BUS BOY WANTED—Meals and Cash.Phelpa A Phelps, 6824 Woodlawn.FOB RENT—Purniahed Cabin on Lake N.Hampshire. Season 860. Minault. 6746Drexel.Apts, for the SummerWe have the following desirable apts. forrent:4 rms. furn. with bath, kitch., porch Aelec, refrig. $46.8 rms. unfurn. with bath, kitch. A elec,refrig. 840.2 rms. furn., shared bath, kitch., elec,refrig. 832.All neatly decorated A well furnished. At6028 Kenwood—phone Butterfield 9424.MUST SACRIFICE my beautiful 1941 modelRadio Phonograph and Recorder combina¬tion, 120 base, accordion, like new andcheap. Call Graoeland 2292.MARINE COAST—Booth Bay Harbor Region.7 Room cottage fully furnished and linen—Woods, surf, fishing, tennis, communityowned by a group of professors. Dor.Chester 9168.CABIN—furnished four room cabin in heart ofRocky Mts. to let $50 for entire season.Call Plaza 3830.Fashion NotesWHENEVERSKIESLOOKGRAYfo ma and fhay carfainly do rightnow Panny musat dolafully. Yat.things ars bad all ovar. It’s baau-fiful and sunshiny and summarfimish,and I want fo ba out loafing on thagrass, faading fha squirrals andpigaons, watching fha tannis matches,or driving with the fop down andfaaling lika fha windblown, glamdrgirl fhay always put in advartisa-mants; which raminds ma thair hairnavar looks all tanglas tha way min#doas whsnavar I rida in a convartibis,must ba a pacutiar talsnt with myhair.• But hart I am with my nosa prassadagainst tha library window, with pilasof notes, reading lists, syllabi thatI don't saa how I can possibly averread ^through much lass learn. Goodday to Paradise Lost, winter quarterreading list. Poor Mary Milton; knowjust how she must have fait.As you can sea Panny has a Classla case of comprahansivitis. A varybad thing, but fortunataiy there areways of combatting it. No. I way isto keep yourself looking swish andcomfortabla. Looking slick and feel¬ing comfortably cool will do morefor your mental attitude than anyset of notes or tutoring sessions. Look¬ing slick and feeling comfortably coolIn this hot weather add up to “cot¬ton" in crisp little dresses that willhave you relegating your braemarsand tweed skirts to the moth belldepartment.200 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUEAT LAKE STREETPage TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Convocation. 1941For two hours, the editorial writer has been sitting looking athis typewriter keys waiting for inspiration from above to tellhim what to say in his final contribution to the Daily Maroon.Nothing has happened, and he is beginning to fear that eithernothing exists Above or the Maroon is not worthy in the eyes ofGod to receive the lightning bolt of rhetorical truth.It falls to him then to frame his own message. But all that hecan think of are the messages he refuses to deliver because eitherthey are being repeated by hundreds of orators at convocationceremonies or because they are sonorous statements of beautifulunrealities or because they are both.Where Is Hope?He cannot say certainly and without qualification that “Whatwe have in America is hope”, because he is not certain that thefuture of America will be hopeful for a great many years to come,no matter which of the paths we choose today.He will not say, “Be strong, be brave” because so many peopleare shouting this to the youth already, and because so often, “bestrong” means “be intolerant” and “be brave” means to be ruth¬less. No one can teach the youth of the country bravery by rhet¬oric, and unless we can first demonstrate that we have somethingworth fighting for, true courage will not be achieved even in battle.He had thought to begin his editorial with Brahm’s resoundingecho of “We are young, therefore let us rejoice!” but he can seelittle for the youth to be joyous about in actual, bitter fact. Tobe young means to be eligible for the draft; to face a period ofmock shoddy prosperity and a longer, havoc-wreaking era ofdespondent depression; to look into uncertainty, struggle forsomething to hold on to in the face of an onrushing tidal wave, andvery probably to fail to find it.The Strong and the WeakEven the sage admonition to “keep your head and temper yourjudgment in this world gone mad” cannot be his message, althoughhe has often repeated it this year. He is now convinced that exceptfor a few strong souls who need not read his editorials to main¬tain their sanity, it is almost useless to preach a sermon that can¬not be heeded by the weak.Thus the ediorial writer finds himself in a dilemma. He willnot repeat what is being well- or ill-said to graduating classes atevery convocation ceremony in every section of the country. Hecannot repeat with confidence the high-sounding dicta which callus to battle, to “sanity,” to hope for he sees no victory, no wisdom,no happiness.“Advice”All that he can do is offer a distilled and rhetorically andartistically unsatisfactory fragment of advice. He can say only,“Graduates of 1941, it were better for you to accept calmly andresolutely the burdens you must bear, since only thus can youexpect to undo the awful things which are today being done; seekwhat can pass for happiness in such a way that you will add nofurther burdens to your heirs; don’t give up all optimism, if onlybecause you need something to maintain a will to live; bear as lit¬tle malice as you can toward those whose mistakes have causedour holocaust, and learn, if you can by their mistakes.”E. S. L.Traveling BazaarBy DICK HIMMELOur Last Good-bye... the last Bazaar of the year is us¬ually devoted to stories that have beenhushed up all year and then are finallyrevealed in a good Hearstian manner...this year as far as I can figure,we didn’t curb many exposes, sothere’s really nothing to reveal.Hello... It’s old news by now, but CynthiaDursema and Jimmy Murr are mar¬ried and have been that way sinceApril 19. The reason it all came toJohn Stevens. . . walks on waterlight was that Cyn bought a lot oflittle lace things for a trousseau andby a mistake the bill went home in¬stead of to her. Her mother was alittle anxious to know why she hadbought all these little lace things.When she found out, wedding an¬nouncements came out in fast order... Bob Mathews and Jean Woodwardare being married the 12th... BlancheGraver and Ed Middleton the 21st... Mary Margaret Mayer and BuffWoolams get hitched the 17th...JeanSkeels and Carl Ellison the 12th...Marjorie Schyltter, who got the topgrade on the English bachelors, mar¬ries her biologist the 11th...Who doyou know that’s getting married, likeLarry Traeger, without anyone know¬ing about it for days and days.Outstanding People ofthe YearPopularity queen of the year is alittle hard to determine, but ShirleeSmith was in there plugging, andplugging hard...Happy Bud Aronsontakes the cake for the best dressedman of the year . . . The friendliestsmile on campus Tom Murray White...Best couple of the year...JaneMoran and Clay Traeger . . . Bestdressed woman: Yvonne Markus (allof her)... Most unusual creature:Betty Boom Bloom... The May Queenof the Intellect, Mary MargueriteHammel... Ideal college youths . . .Henri Mahon, ’cause she’s pretty,smart, popular, nice and besides thatshe is sitting right next to me . . .And Johnny Stevens ’cause he has allthe qualities of Henrietta Mahon(and a Phi Bete key to boot—) ex¬cept he isn’t so pretty.. .Best imita¬tion of the year Nels Fuqua as JohnCrosby...Accent OnYouthFIFTH ROW CENTERBy Loren Flint“Weep No More’’ Sylvia Sidneyand Luther “Odets No More’’ Adlerhave deserted their usual Bronx inspired vehicles to appear at the Sel-wyn in Samuel Raphaelson’s comedy,“Accent on Youth’’, a play thatshocked audiences out of their seatssome six years ago on the stage andin the movies.The present production is LutherAdler’s show all the way through. Hemanages to make the show a kind ofpleasing summer evening’s enter¬tainment. That he was able to savethe show in the face of the low cal¬ibre of the supporting players is afurther tribute to the delightful act¬ing of Adler. Always he is convinc¬ing as the man of 53 in love with a22-year-old girl. Always he realizesa theatrical gag and makes the mostof it. Always he underplays in thescenes with Miss Sidney. Miss Sid¬ney is currently Mrs. Luther Adler.As the 22-year-old secretary-ac¬tress, Miss Sidney manages to keepfrom crying most of the time and looksvery well in her clothes. She is ham¬pered by a new color hair, called or¬ange. It is not so bad when she has itneatly combed, but in the third actshe whips out of a bedroom in a bath¬robe with her orange hair frizzedout to the limits. For a minute Ithought it was “Of Human Bondage’’.Her performance is very unimagin¬ative and it is always a happy thoughtwhen Mr. Adler comes back to savethe show.The only one in the supporting castwho manages to project anything atall is Kevin McCarthy, as the bodybeautiful boy. He has one scene withAdler which is the high comic spotof the show.The next-to-best glamour girl inin the show projects glamour byswishing on the stage, throwing herhead back, and letting the veins inher neck stick out. Some like it hot.Surprisingly enough the play isn’tterribly dated. It is less shocking aft¬er six years, but Raphaelson has awinsome charm about his plays thatmakes them enjoyable. The set wasratty looking, but nothing that agood coat of paint won’t clear up.It is Luther Adler’s show. It seems,however, that he might have found avehicle more worthy of his talents.7fie OoUli TfhAOOtiThe Dailr Maroon is the oflieial studentnewspaper of the University of Chicago, pub¬lished mornings except Saturday, Sunday, andMonday during the Autumn. Winter, andSpring quarters by The Daily Maroon Com¬pany, 6881 University avenue. Telephones:Hyde Park 9222.After 6:80 phone in stories to our printers.The Chief Printing Company, 148 West 62ndstreet. Telephones: Wentworth 6128 and 6124.llie University of Chicago assumes no re¬sponsibility for any statements appearing inThe Daily Maroon, or for any contract enteredinto by The Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves therights of publication of any material appear¬ing in this paper. Subscription rates: $8 ayear; 84 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Entered as second class matter March 18,1998, at the post office at Chicago, Illinois,under the act of March 8, 1879.Memberf^ssocioted Cblleftafe Pl-essDUtribulor ofGollebiate Di6estBOARD OP CONTROLWILLIAM HANKLA ERNEST LEISEBPEARL C. RUBINSJOHN P. STEVENS, ChairmanBusinessROBERT O’DONNELL. Business ManagerRobert Highman, Adv. Mgr.EDITORIAL A880CUTE8James Burtle, Mark Fisher, Robert Lawson,Richard Himmel, Daniel Mezlay, RichardPhilbrick, Robert D. Reynolds, and DanielWinograd. ,BUSINESS ASSOCIATESCHESTER SMITH, CirculationELLEN TUTTLE, Office Mgr.Richard Bolks, Wm. Van Horn. Myles Jarrow,Robert Precler, Edward L. RachlinNight Editors: John Stevens, Ernest Leiser,Mark Fisher, David Gottlieb and Dick HimmelCool Summer Roomsat HiePHI PSI HOUSEVery Reaionable RatesCall Chester Smith atPlata 7703 or Maroon OfficeIC-OIH'Then send youi baggage to ye old home¬stead by Railway Express and take yourtrain with peace of mind. We call anddeliver at no extra charge within ourregular vehicle limits in all cities andprincipal towns. Service is fast, econom¬ical—and sure as shootin’! Just phone^ RAILW^^i^I^PRESS ^A NATION-WIDE lAll-AIR SIRVICE AThis Summer at the SherryCOOL BREEZES DRIFTING ACROSS LAKE MICHIGANWILL MAKE DINING IN THE EXQUISITE FLORENTINE ROOMMOST PLEASANT DURING THE SUMMER.DISCRIMINATE UNIVERSITY PEOPLE CHOOSE THE QUIETSOPHISTICATION AND IMPECCABLE EXPERIENCED SERVICEOF 'THE SHERRY.’■"^^KcrrgFIFTY-THIRD STREET AT THE LAKECHICAGOCap and GownThe ’41 edition of Cap and Gownwill be ready for distribution June10th. Subscribers can receive theircopies at the Cap and Gown officein Lexington Hall.CLASSIFIEDTO SELL—Flowers, pipes and tobacco, andhotel entertainment duebills at slashedprices to liquidate accumulated asaets. SeeEllen Tuttle, Office Manager, Daily Ma¬roon business office—Lexington Hall.SPECIAL — Edgewater Beach Duebilla 29%off. Call at Business office Daily MaroonLex. Hall.BUS BOY WANTED—Meals and Cash.Phelpa A Phelps, 6824 Woodlawn.FOB RENT—Purniahed Cabin on Lake N.Hampshire. Season 860. Minault. 6746Drexel.Apts, for the SummerWe have the following desirable apts. forrent:4 rms. furn. with bath, kitch., porch Aelec, refrig. $46.8 rms. unfurn. with bath, kitch. A elec,refrig. 840.2 rms. furn., shared bath, kitch., elec,refrig. 832.All neatly decorated A well furnished. At6028 Kenwood—phone Butterfield 9424.MUST SACRIFICE my beautiful 1941 modelRadio Phonograph and Recorder combina¬tion, 120 base, accordion, like new andcheap. Call Graoeland 2292.MARINE COAST—Booth Bay Harbor Region.7 Room cottage fully furnished and linen—Woods, surf, fishing, tennis, communityowned by a group of professors. Dor.Chester 9168.CABIN—furnished four room cabin in heart ofRocky Mts. to let $50 for entire season.Call Plaza 3830.Fashion NotesWHENEVERSKIESLOOKGRAYfo ma and fhay carfainly do rightnow Panny musat dolafully. Yat.things ars bad all ovar. It’s baau-fiful and sunshiny and summarfimish,and I want fo ba out loafing on thagrass, faading fha squirrals andpigaons, watching fha tannis matches,or driving with the fop down andfaaling lika fha windblown, glamdrgirl fhay always put in advartisa-mants; which raminds ma thair hairnavar looks all tanglas tha way min#doas whsnavar I rida in a convartibis,must ba a pacutiar talsnt with myhair.• But hart I am with my nosa prassadagainst tha library window, with pilasof notes, reading lists, syllabi thatI don't saa how I can possibly averread ^through much lass learn. Goodday to Paradise Lost, winter quarterreading list. Poor Mary Milton; knowjust how she must have fait.As you can sea Panny has a Classla case of comprahansivitis. A varybad thing, but fortunataiy there areways of combatting it. No. I way isto keep yourself looking swish andcomfortabla. Looking slick and feel¬ing comfortably cool will do morefor your mental attitude than anyset of notes or tutoring sessions. Look¬ing slick and feeling comfortably coolIn this hot weather add up to “cot¬ton" in crisp little dresses that willhave you relegating your braemarsand tweed skirts to the moth belldepartment.200 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUEAT LAKE STREETaTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Page ThreeSeniors Say "GoodBye" With Big PartyCastleman WinsPoetry ContestMarian Jay Castleman won theFiske Poetry Prize of $100, the Eng¬lish department announced yesterdayThe title of the work was “Return”,and the prize was awarded Miss Cas¬tleman upon the unanimous decisionof the contest judges.This is the fourth time she has en¬tered the contest, and the first shehas won first prize. For three successive years she was one of the win¬ners of honorable mention.The poem was a contemporarystudy of a man who was trying togain security. Rights to its originalpublication belong to the prize com¬mittee.Miss Castleman is a senior in thedepartment of English who is seekinga masters’ degree this August. Sheis the assistant to Dean Randall,editor of the Library Quarterly.WAHTED:GREGG COLLEGESTENOGRAPHERS, SECRETARIESAND COURT REPORTERSt* SU 117 poaltions—onr monthly artrasofor 10 montha . . . moro than twica onraYailabla anpply of (radaatea. EnrollN9W. Call, writa or telcphona State 1881for SS-pac# FREE Catalof. (Co-cdnca-tional.)COLLEGE TRAINED STUDENTSMAY ENROLL AT ANY TIMEThe GREGG CollegePreaident, John Robert GreKg, S.C.D.Director, Paul M. Pair, M.A.0 N. Michigan Are.. ChicagowIVBIIIIOBIRVBy DICK HIMMELAre you geHing bald? Haveyou still got all your hair? Comeon, boys. It's either one way orthe otner. Well, if you don'thave all your hair you wear ahat. If you have all your hair youstill wear a hat, because wnenyou take it off everybody fallsover dead when they see youstill have hair.What do you do for a hat inthe summer? You certainly don'twear that old felt with thewatermark on the hatband. No.You know what you do? That'sright. You whip right down tothe HUB and buy one of theDobbs summer straws and bethe slickest looking joe this sideof the beach at Waikiki (I don'tthink I spelled that right.)Yes, men, throw out thosesailor straws that look like some¬thing out of the Broadway mel¬ody of 1902. Don't throw themout. Give them to your father.On second thought, maybe you'dbetter throw them out.Try one of the crunchy burntcocoanut straws with DorothyLamour wrapped around themiddle. It's not really DorothyLamour, but just a piece of hersarong made into a hat band.The hats are just right for coun¬try club lounging, wearing towork to impress the boss thatyou are the young executivetype, dating, and the bathtub.There's a huge selection atthe HUB in all shapes, sizes, andcolors. They are priced at $3.50,$5, $7.50, and $10.Function Free to Class of '41and Social Committee.Not content with the traditionalformality of marching up the aisle toreceive a diploma as the climax offour years of university work, theclass of ’41 felt the need for one finalspecial function to bring the fouryears to a successful close. The Senior Farewell Party is their answer.The last function of the class of’41 before their convocation June10th, the Farewell Party will be heldthe night before in Ida Noyes Gymand gardens. The evening’s enter¬tainment starts at ten and will con¬tinue until one.Free for AllThe party is entirely free to allmembers of the senior class and toguests of the Social Committee, andthe committee in charge of arrange¬ments urges all seniors to take ad¬vantage of this last opportunity tomingle with their classmates in aninformal atmosphere.Music for dancing will be furnishedby Charley Cox and his orchestra,an aggregation that made a big hitwhen it played for the last MortarBoard party.When the party was first planned,the committee announced that itwould be semi-formal, but presentplans have changed it to an informal,with any kind of sports outfit appro¬priate.University ToPresent NewAir CoursesAs the need for flyers becomesmore and more pressing the armyhas relaxed its entrance requirementsfor the air corps to permit men pass¬ing examinations at the level of twoyears of college to enter the FlyingCadets.During the coming summer theUniversity will offer a “refresher”course designed to prepare men forthese examinations which will be giv¬en here August 12, 13, and 14. To beeligible for the examinations the ap¬plicant must be physically qualifiedand between the ages of 20 and 26.Courses to be given under this pro¬gram are English composition andgrammer, mathematics including Al¬gebra, Quadratics, Plane Geometry,and Trigonometry. Applicants for en¬trance to the air corps who have cred¬its amounting to two years in collegewill not be required to pass scholas¬tic examinations.Those taking the summer coursemust also offer work in any two ofthe following subjects: U. S. or Gen¬eral History, Elementary Physics,Inorganic Chemistry, or any modernlanguage except English for the ex¬aminations.The Flying Cadets will be trainedby the Army Air Corps for commis¬sions as Second Lieutenants in theAir Corps Reserve. They will be re¬quired to take a specified period ofactive service immediately after theirgraduation from the service schools..llHaveANightlyLagerEither byYourself orwith "Joe"1512 E. 55th St.Open New Basic -Military CourseFor Summer QuarterChicago’s unique Institute of Mil¬itary Studies, which has already pro¬vided one thousand Chicagoans withinstruction in military fundamentals,will offer an improved version of itsbasic military course during the com¬ing summer.The course, starting June 27, isopen to all men in this area between18 and 45 years old who are Ameri¬can citizens. The program will begiven in four successive week-ends atMill Road Farm in Lake Forest.Trainees will leave the Fieldhouseeach Friday evening and return byeight the following Monday morning.The second week-end, fourth of July,they will leave Thursday evening.The summer quarter will also pro¬vide an opportunity for teachers inattendance at summer school to be¬come civilian instructors at their ownschools.Designed primarily for those in¬tending to volunteer or those aboutto be drafted, the course will alsomake men beyond conscription agefamiliar with military practices in theevent they may be needed for homedefense.Those interested should apply atthe Information desk, or at 6 NorthMichigan Blvd.Theodore KiitzkeWins Chapel ContestTheodore Kiitzke has been declaredthe winner of the Chapel cross designcontest, the Art Department announc¬ed today. The first prize carried withit a $50.00 award.Kiitzke received the prize after hisdesign was judged best by a commit¬tee made up of Mrs. Hutchins, DeanGilkey and members of the Art De¬partment.A graduate member of the Art De¬partment, Kiitzke has won prizes inmany Ida Noyes art contests. Whenit has been decided in what materialthe design will be executed, it willbe placed in the Chapel.TENNIS RACKETS<1 ‘5 to *17 “Rackets of all leading manufacturers.Balls, Presses, and all accessories.Shorts, Sox, Shirts, Shoes, etc.COMPLETE RESTRINGING SERVICEWOODWORTH'S s'IorI1311 E. 57th St. Open EveningsNear Kimbark Ave. DORchester 4800SELWYN BEGINNING TONIGHT■VENDfOS INCLUDINO limDAT—MATINniS WEDNESDAY AND 8ATVRDATAlwayg Comfortobly Air-CooledPopular Summer Prices!EVES.: ENTIRE ORCH., $1.65HAMXO A KENNCOV fntmUh Sflmson MMMCLSOirS OIVKItWRKCDIKOVinACCEHT OH YOVnEVENINGS: ENTIRE BALC., $I.IU; MATINEES: ORCU. A BALC., 81.10The nicest thing next to your neck— anArtowcoUcae If you want to look super-sweU on your nextdate, here's how:Get yourseli some ok our brand new Arrowstarched collars to crown your handsomestnedcbond shirt We hove some of the slickeststyles ever concocted. You'll like the economyand comfort of Arrow collars.Neckband Shirts $2 upC<^ars 25c eachERIE Clothing Co.837 E. 63rdFATHER’SDAYJuie 1511IT'S A VERY NICE FEELING.you know . . . once in a whilethrough the year a man begins towonder if maybe the kids aren'tkinda driftin' away . . . kinda for-gettin* about the "old man."Then up pops a day like this . . .and in they come with a little some¬thing—mebbe not much—but justsomething to let you know that allyour worries are nonsense. I tell youit does a man good when that hap¬pens!A guy’s onlyhuman, after ailEven the best of us just can't helpwanting a little of that warm feelingaround the heart that comes fromknowing you're being thought of.I guess that's only human . . . andconfidentially, fathers are prettymuch like anybody else.ERIE CAN HELPyou rememberWe've been catering to fathers fora long, long time ... so we knowpretty much what they like. In fact,if you'll just drop in and tell us howmuch you want to spend . . . we'llguarantee to fix you up with some¬thing he'll like—AND SAVE YOUMONEY.BRINQ THIS CHECK LISTWITH YOUII□ TIES—Arrow, Pala Boaeh.□ SOX—IntorwovoR.□ SHIRTS—Arrow, Kingly.□ SPORTSWEAR-WHsoe□ SHOES-Florshoin.□ HATt-Knox, Mallory. i□ JEWELRY-Swont□ Sport Jaekott. 'ir□ Pain Boaoh SaHs.NORTH SIDE STORES4S N. CLARK ST.aTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Page ThreeSeniors Say "GoodBye" With Big PartyCastleman WinsPoetry ContestMarian Jay Castleman won theFiske Poetry Prize of $100, the Eng¬lish department announced yesterdayThe title of the work was “Return”,and the prize was awarded Miss Cas¬tleman upon the unanimous decisionof the contest judges.This is the fourth time she has en¬tered the contest, and the first shehas won first prize. For three successive years she was one of the win¬ners of honorable mention.The poem was a contemporarystudy of a man who was trying togain security. Rights to its originalpublication belong to the prize com¬mittee.Miss Castleman is a senior in thedepartment of English who is seekinga masters’ degree this August. Sheis the assistant to Dean Randall,editor of the Library Quarterly.WAHTED:GREGG COLLEGESTENOGRAPHERS, SECRETARIESAND COURT REPORTERSt* SU 117 poaltions—onr monthly artrasofor 10 montha . . . moro than twica onraYailabla anpply of (radaatea. EnrollN9W. Call, writa or telcphona State 1881for SS-pac# FREE Catalof. (Co-cdnca-tional.)COLLEGE TRAINED STUDENTSMAY ENROLL AT ANY TIMEThe GREGG CollegePreaident, John Robert GreKg, S.C.D.Director, Paul M. Pair, M.A.0 N. Michigan Are.. ChicagowIVBIIIIOBIRVBy DICK HIMMELAre you geHing bald? Haveyou still got all your hair? Comeon, boys. It's either one way orthe otner. Well, if you don'thave all your hair you wear ahat. If you have all your hair youstill wear a hat, because wnenyou take it off everybody fallsover dead when they see youstill have hair.What do you do for a hat inthe summer? You certainly don'twear that old felt with thewatermark on the hatband. No.You know what you do? That'sright. You whip right down tothe HUB and buy one of theDobbs summer straws and bethe slickest looking joe this sideof the beach at Waikiki (I don'tthink I spelled that right.)Yes, men, throw out thosesailor straws that look like some¬thing out of the Broadway mel¬ody of 1902. Don't throw themout. Give them to your father.On second thought, maybe you'dbetter throw them out.Try one of the crunchy burntcocoanut straws with DorothyLamour wrapped around themiddle. It's not really DorothyLamour, but just a piece of hersarong made into a hat band.The hats are just right for coun¬try club lounging, wearing towork to impress the boss thatyou are the young executivetype, dating, and the bathtub.There's a huge selection atthe HUB in all shapes, sizes, andcolors. They are priced at $3.50,$5, $7.50, and $10.Function Free to Class of '41and Social Committee.Not content with the traditionalformality of marching up the aisle toreceive a diploma as the climax offour years of university work, theclass of ’41 felt the need for one finalspecial function to bring the fouryears to a successful close. The Senior Farewell Party is their answer.The last function of the class of’41 before their convocation June10th, the Farewell Party will be heldthe night before in Ida Noyes Gymand gardens. The evening’s enter¬tainment starts at ten and will con¬tinue until one.Free for AllThe party is entirely free to allmembers of the senior class and toguests of the Social Committee, andthe committee in charge of arrange¬ments urges all seniors to take ad¬vantage of this last opportunity tomingle with their classmates in aninformal atmosphere.Music for dancing will be furnishedby Charley Cox and his orchestra,an aggregation that made a big hitwhen it played for the last MortarBoard party.When the party was first planned,the committee announced that itwould be semi-formal, but presentplans have changed it to an informal,with any kind of sports outfit appro¬priate.University ToPresent NewAir CoursesAs the need for flyers becomesmore and more pressing the armyhas relaxed its entrance requirementsfor the air corps to permit men pass¬ing examinations at the level of twoyears of college to enter the FlyingCadets.During the coming summer theUniversity will offer a “refresher”course designed to prepare men forthese examinations which will be giv¬en here August 12, 13, and 14. To beeligible for the examinations the ap¬plicant must be physically qualifiedand between the ages of 20 and 26.Courses to be given under this pro¬gram are English composition andgrammer, mathematics including Al¬gebra, Quadratics, Plane Geometry,and Trigonometry. Applicants for en¬trance to the air corps who have cred¬its amounting to two years in collegewill not be required to pass scholas¬tic examinations.Those taking the summer coursemust also offer work in any two ofthe following subjects: U. S. or Gen¬eral History, Elementary Physics,Inorganic Chemistry, or any modernlanguage except English for the ex¬aminations.The Flying Cadets will be trainedby the Army Air Corps for commis¬sions as Second Lieutenants in theAir Corps Reserve. They will be re¬quired to take a specified period ofactive service immediately after theirgraduation from the service schools..llHaveANightlyLagerEither byYourself orwith "Joe"1512 E. 55th St.Open New Basic -Military CourseFor Summer QuarterChicago’s unique Institute of Mil¬itary Studies, which has already pro¬vided one thousand Chicagoans withinstruction in military fundamentals,will offer an improved version of itsbasic military course during the com¬ing summer.The course, starting June 27, isopen to all men in this area between18 and 45 years old who are Ameri¬can citizens. The program will begiven in four successive week-ends atMill Road Farm in Lake Forest.Trainees will leave the Fieldhouseeach Friday evening and return byeight the following Monday morning.The second week-end, fourth of July,they will leave Thursday evening.The summer quarter will also pro¬vide an opportunity for teachers inattendance at summer school to be¬come civilian instructors at their ownschools.Designed primarily for those in¬tending to volunteer or those aboutto be drafted, the course will alsomake men beyond conscription agefamiliar with military practices in theevent they may be needed for homedefense.Those interested should apply atthe Information desk, or at 6 NorthMichigan Blvd.Theodore KiitzkeWins Chapel ContestTheodore Kiitzke has been declaredthe winner of the Chapel cross designcontest, the Art Department announc¬ed today. The first prize carried withit a $50.00 award.Kiitzke received the prize after hisdesign was judged best by a commit¬tee made up of Mrs. Hutchins, DeanGilkey and members of the Art De¬partment.A graduate member of the Art De¬partment, Kiitzke has won prizes inmany Ida Noyes art contests. Whenit has been decided in what materialthe design will be executed, it willbe placed in the Chapel.TENNIS RACKETS<1 ‘5 to *17 “Rackets of all leading manufacturers.Balls, Presses, and all accessories.Shorts, Sox, Shirts, Shoes, etc.COMPLETE RESTRINGING SERVICEWOODWORTH'S s'IorI1311 E. 57th St. Open EveningsNear Kimbark Ave. DORchester 4800SELWYN BEGINNING TONIGHT■VENDfOS INCLUDINO limDAT—MATINniS WEDNESDAY AND 8ATVRDATAlwayg Comfortobly Air-CooledPopular Summer Prices!EVES.: ENTIRE ORCH., $1.65HAMXO A KENNCOV fntmUh Sflmson MMMCLSOirS OIVKItWRKCDIKOVinACCEHT OH YOVnEVENINGS: ENTIRE BALC., $I.IU; MATINEES: ORCU. A BALC., 81.10The nicest thing next to your neck— anArtowcoUcae If you want to look super-sweU on your nextdate, here's how:Get yourseli some ok our brand new Arrowstarched collars to crown your handsomestnedcbond shirt We hove some of the slickeststyles ever concocted. You'll like the economyand comfort of Arrow collars.Neckband Shirts $2 upC<^ars 25c eachERIE Clothing Co.837 E. 63rdFATHER’SDAYJuie 1511IT'S A VERY NICE FEELING.you know . . . once in a whilethrough the year a man begins towonder if maybe the kids aren'tkinda driftin' away . . . kinda for-gettin* about the "old man."Then up pops a day like this . . .and in they come with a little some¬thing—mebbe not much—but justsomething to let you know that allyour worries are nonsense. I tell youit does a man good when that hap¬pens!A guy’s onlyhuman, after ailEven the best of us just can't helpwanting a little of that warm feelingaround the heart that comes fromknowing you're being thought of.I guess that's only human . . . andconfidentially, fathers are prettymuch like anybody else.ERIE CAN HELPyou rememberWe've been catering to fathers fora long, long time ... so we knowpretty much what they like. In fact,if you'll just drop in and tell us howmuch you want to spend . . . we'llguarantee to fix you up with some¬thing he'll like—AND SAVE YOUMONEY.BRINQ THIS CHECK LISTWITH YOUII□ TIES—Arrow, Pala Boaeh.□ SOX—IntorwovoR.□ SHIRTS—Arrow, Kingly.□ SPORTSWEAR-WHsoe□ SHOES-Florshoin.□ HATt-Knox, Mallory. i□ JEWELRY-Swont□ Sport Jaekott. 'ir□ Pain Boaoh SaHs.NORTH SIDE STORES4S N. CLARK ST.Page FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Phi Beta KappaElects 39 SeniorsThirty-nine members of this Spring’s graduating class have been electedinto Phi Beta Kappa and will be initiated June 9. The complete list follows.Division of the Biological Sciences (7)Robert Ramsey BigelowAnatomyJohn Arnold BolzAnatomyPaul Robson GlenisterBotanyJames William MoulderBiochemistryAnne RowellBotanyJohn Robert RussellPhysiologyEllen WattsPsychologydivision of the Humanities (7)Shirley Jane HillHistoryBernard Robert KoganEnglishElinor LounsburyEnglishStewart Irvin OostHistoryMarjorie Ben SchlytterEnglishRobert Melville SlusserHistoryJohn Paul StevensEnglishlivision of the Physical Sciences (14)Robert Leonard AdelmanChemistryLouis Edward DiamondMathematicsPaul Robert FieldsChemistryDave FultzChemistryAlexander Robb JacobyMathematicsWilbert Samuel KurnickMathematicsJoseph Solomon LevingerPhysicsWilliam Schumacher MasseyMathematicsElbert Axel PetersonChemistryJohn Frederick SpeckChemistryRobert Lee WalkerPhysicsJames Earl WalshMathematicsSol WexlerChemistryEdwin Leopold ZebroskiChemistryDivision of the Social Sciences (9)Ruth Harriet McMurry Berens (Mrs.)Edward Joseph FurstJoseph Adolph GreenwaldHelen Diane IsenbergLouise LandmanCarol Jean SchuhmanMorton R. SolomonAlbert SomitIrvin ZelitskyThe Law School (2)Lorenz Fred Koerber, Jr.Political SciencePsychologyEconomicsPolitical SciencePolitical SciencePsychologyEconomicsPolitical SciencePolitical ScienceAaron Benjamin MandersTag Day Nets $253Settlement Tag Day netted $253.-09 May 13, Marjorie Brooks has justannounced. Proceeds went directly tothe U. of C. Settlement. Last year’sgross was $216, a low figure becauseof rain.For SettlementMost tags were sold by Quadrang-ler Libby McKey who handed out 83at Cobb. The next three were PhyllisPeltz, Triota, who sold 75, DorothyWendrick, Mortar Board, with 73,adn Pat Smith, selling 70 for DeltaSigma.BIG PARTY?Use theSTUDENT RECORD PARTY SERVICEMusic Supplied and Conducted for Any OccasionSOUND SYSTEMS RECORD PLAYERS— RENTING RECORDS IS SMART ECONOMY! —Midway 6000JIM RICHARDFRANK RICHARDJudson CourtNEW LOCATIONTERESA DOLANDANCING SCHOOL1208 E. «3 St.Near Woodlawn Ave.BEG. CLASSESMON. - THURS. AT 8:00PRIVATE LESSONS ANYTIMEPHONE HYDE PARK 30604 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSEFOR COllCGE STUDENTS AND GRADUATESA tkonmeh, imtmuiM, eomnt—ttarting Jammary 1. April 1, Juh 1, October IInUrastme BookiM tant frm, witkomt oMaatiom— wrUatrphoma. No tolteitaat amtpiopad.moserbusiness collegePAUL MOSER, J.0WPN.R.a( aoek wumtiL AdaameadMV Momdtn. Dap mmd Eoamng.116 S. Miciiifloa Av*.. 4$4ySTUDENTSThere Are General Openings For ThoseInterested In Securing Summer orPermanent EmploymentThe positions listed below require no experience.10 College Graduates for Executive Training ($130-150)5 College Graduates to Learn Merchandising, $13015 Young AccountantsI Graduate Engineer for Personnel Work ($130-150)5 College Graduates to Learn Insurance ($100-125)I Male Stenographer for Personnel Dept., $10030 Girls—^Typists—Stenographers—Summer WorkALL TRADES EMPLOYMENT BUREAUPhone Harrison 9810APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE MAROON BUSINESS OFFICEs■GIFTSFOR FATHER'S DAYTies - Socks - HandkerchiefsPipes - Cameras - Golf BallsHIS FAVORITE MAGAZINESEsquire - National Geographic - FortuneField and Stream - Life - TimeTIMELY BOOKS,f ^ Ambassador Dodd's DiaryBlood Sweat and TearsDays of Our YearsJ This Above AllFOR GRADUATIONBill Folds - Pen Sets - Radios - TypewritersStationery - College JewelryCompacts - PerfumesBook Ends - Electric RazorsEtchings - Prints - HosieryCandy - Albums - Guest BooksAPPROPRIATE BOOKSSong of Songs - Grapes of WrathThe Prophet - Romance of Leonardo da VinciBound in Attractive Gift LeathersHEW TITLESThe Forgotten VillageMen of WealthBasic Works of AristotleMichelangelo PaintingsCome in and Make Your SelectionsUNIVERSITY of CHICAGO BOOKSTORE5802 ELLIS AVENUEPage FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Phi Beta KappaElects 39 SeniorsThirty-nine members of this Spring’s graduating class have been electedinto Phi Beta Kappa and will be initiated June 9. The complete list follows.Division of the Biological Sciences (7)Robert Ramsey BigelowAnatomyJohn Arnold BolzAnatomyPaul Robson GlenisterBotanyJames William MoulderBiochemistryAnne RowellBotanyJohn Robert RussellPhysiologyEllen WattsPsychologydivision of the Humanities (7)Shirley Jane HillHistoryBernard Robert KoganEnglishElinor LounsburyEnglishStewart Irvin OostHistoryMarjorie Ben SchlytterEnglishRobert Melville SlusserHistoryJohn Paul StevensEnglishlivision of the Physical Sciences (14)Robert Leonard AdelmanChemistryLouis Edward DiamondMathematicsPaul Robert FieldsChemistryDave FultzChemistryAlexander Robb JacobyMathematicsWilbert Samuel KurnickMathematicsJoseph Solomon LevingerPhysicsWilliam Schumacher MasseyMathematicsElbert Axel PetersonChemistryJohn Frederick SpeckChemistryRobert Lee WalkerPhysicsJames Earl WalshMathematicsSol WexlerChemistryEdwin Leopold ZebroskiChemistryDivision of the Social Sciences (9)Ruth Harriet McMurry Berens (Mrs.)Edward Joseph FurstJoseph Adolph GreenwaldHelen Diane IsenbergLouise LandmanCarol Jean SchuhmanMorton R. SolomonAlbert SomitIrvin ZelitskyThe Law School (2)Lorenz Fred Koerber, Jr.Political SciencePsychologyEconomicsPolitical SciencePolitical SciencePsychologyEconomicsPolitical SciencePolitical ScienceAaron Benjamin MandersTag Day Nets $253Settlement Tag Day netted $253.-09 May 13, Marjorie Brooks has justannounced. Proceeds went directly tothe U. of C. Settlement. Last year’sgross was $216, a low figure becauseof rain.For SettlementMost tags were sold by Quadrang-ler Libby McKey who handed out 83at Cobb. The next three were PhyllisPeltz, Triota, who sold 75, DorothyWendrick, Mortar Board, with 73,adn Pat Smith, selling 70 for DeltaSigma.BIG PARTY?Use theSTUDENT RECORD PARTY SERVICEMusic Supplied and Conducted for Any OccasionSOUND SYSTEMS RECORD PLAYERS— RENTING RECORDS IS SMART ECONOMY! —Midway 6000JIM RICHARDFRANK RICHARDJudson CourtNEW LOCATIONTERESA DOLANDANCING SCHOOL1208 E. «3 St.Near Woodlawn Ave.BEG. CLASSESMON. - THURS. AT 8:00PRIVATE LESSONS ANYTIMEPHONE HYDE PARK 30604 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSEFOR COllCGE STUDENTS AND GRADUATESA tkonmeh, imtmuiM, eomnt—ttarting Jammary 1. April 1, Juh 1, October IInUrastme BookiM tant frm, witkomt oMaatiom— wrUatrphoma. No tolteitaat amtpiopad.moserbusiness collegePAUL MOSER, J.0WPN.R.a( aoek wumtiL AdaameadMV Momdtn. Dap mmd Eoamng.116 S. Miciiifloa Av*.. 4$4ySTUDENTSThere Are General Openings For ThoseInterested In Securing Summer orPermanent EmploymentThe positions listed below require no experience.10 College Graduates for Executive Training ($130-150)5 College Graduates to Learn Merchandising, $13015 Young AccountantsI Graduate Engineer for Personnel Work ($130-150)5 College Graduates to Learn Insurance ($100-125)I Male Stenographer for Personnel Dept., $10030 Girls—^Typists—Stenographers—Summer WorkALL TRADES EMPLOYMENT BUREAUPhone Harrison 9810APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE MAROON BUSINESS OFFICEs■GIFTSFOR FATHER'S DAYTies - Socks - HandkerchiefsPipes - Cameras - Golf BallsHIS FAVORITE MAGAZINESEsquire - National Geographic - FortuneField and Stream - Life - TimeTIMELY BOOKS,f ^ Ambassador Dodd's DiaryBlood Sweat and TearsDays of Our YearsJ This Above AllFOR GRADUATIONBill Folds - Pen Sets - Radios - TypewritersStationery - College JewelryCompacts - PerfumesBook Ends - Electric RazorsEtchings - Prints - HosieryCandy - Albums - Guest BooksAPPROPRIATE BOOKSSong of Songs - Grapes of WrathThe Prophet - Romance of Leonardo da VinciBound in Attractive Gift LeathersHEW TITLESThe Forgotten VillageMen of WealthBasic Works of AristotleMichelangelo PaintingsCome in and Make Your SelectionsUNIVERSITY of CHICAGO BOOKSTORE5802 ELLIS AVENUETHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Page FiveTHE DAILY MAROON SPORTSFound MemorialFor Dan HofferUndergraduates and alumni whohad gymnastics training under thelate Daniel L. Hoffer, former gym¬nastics coach at the University, havefounded a double memorial in hishonor.Headed by Erwin Beyer, presentcoach and a former National Cham¬pion under Hoffer, they intend todedicate a placque in his honor andhang it in Bartlett Gymnasium. Inaddition, a trophy, named in Hoffer’shonor, will be presented annually tothe Chicago man who places highestin the Western Conference meet.Contributions for the fund will beaccepted by the Athletic Department.Alumni WinPacked stands cheered enthusi¬astically yesterday as the alumniwon the annual Alumni-Varsitybaseball game 8-6 on GreenwoodField. Although both teams showedspotty fielding, alumni and var¬sity managed to knock out hits inspite of sterling pitching on bothsides.VARSITY AWARDSSpring Quarter1941BASEBALLMAJOR “C”OLD ENGLISH “C”PLAIN GARMENTGeorge BasichJohn Evans BeeksHarry BurkKenneth GarverickJack Lincoln FonsLuther CooperriderSeymour HirschbergRobert Scott GruhnArthur LopatkaKenneth JensenAaron MandersRobert MeyerRobert Charles MillerCarl NohlDominic ParisiWilliam OostenbrugEarl ShankenCourtney ShankenTENNISJames HillGrover DalyEdward A. IdeWalter KemetickRalph JohansonStanley LevyRobert LiftonJames McClureCalvin SawyierWilliam SelfFrancis David MartinTRACKRichard KasiusStanley ClasterAlvin ConwayRobert KincheloeTruman DahlbergRichard BlakesleeDonald MarrowRobert HixsonDonald ByesRay RandallOrville KanouseFrank HarrisonJames Lloyd RayJohn LeggittWilliam HughVincent LongRendlemanHoward WinklemanAlfred Rider, Jr.Clifford WilliamStabenauWarren Knapp WilnerJohn WilsonUNlVt»81TYTAVERN1131 & 1133 E SSth StANDLIQUOR STOREFREE DELIVERY MIDWAY 0524COMPLETE LINE OFBEER - WINES - UQUORSWE FEATUREBlotz and Siebens BeersMichigan Wins BigTen Baseball TitleMichiiran 10 2 .833Iowa T 3 .700Illinois 7 4 .636Indiana 7 6 .683Minnesota 7 6 .683Ohio State 6 6 .600Wisconsin 6 6 .466Northwestern 6 7 .417Purdue 4 8 .333Chicaso 0 12 .000With only two more games remain¬ing on the schedule the Michiganbaseball team, overlooked in pre-sea¬son dope sheets, replaces Northwest¬ern and Illinois as Big Ten champions.Combining pitching and hitting, theWolverines showed a well-balancedteam throughout the season. DickWakefield, sophomore centerfielder,was one of the big factors and alreadyhas big league scouts watching hisbat eagerly.Iowa and Ohio State meet thisATTENTIONMen Students in Education & SociologyTkart ara a faw studant counsallor positions opan at tha Univarsityof Michigan Frash Air Camp for Boys, on Pattarson Laka, 25 milesfrom Ann Arbor. Graduates and next year seniors are eligible. Sixhours univarsity credit, board, room, and lodging for regular summersession fee of $50 for out of state students. For information write Mr.Nicholas Schraibar, Lana Hall, Ann Arbor, Michigan.WORDSandUSICfor the Songs you will Hear at the SINGas well as the favorite Songsof this CAMPUSand 60 other leading Campuseswill be found in theFiftieth Anniversary Editionof theUniversity of Chicago Song Bookin Process of Publication.Leave Your Orders NOWfor one of the first copies at theU. of C. Bookstore5802 Ellisweek-end with the positions of bothteams in the balance. Ohio State canclimb into the first division by win¬ning both, which action would dropIowa to third.Smith AddressesTransfer MeetingWith Dean Leon P. Smith and apaucity of counsellors sharing thespotlight, the Transfer OrientationCommittee, headed by Jack Kneupferand Muriel Thomson, met yesterdayin Ida Noyes for the first time.A tentative program has been ar¬ranged, but the committee is issuinga call for more counsellors. Anytransfer student is eligible. Kneupfermay be contacted at InternationalHouse, and Miss Thomson at IdaNoyes.NU PI SIGMA 1941-42Virginia AllenAnn SchroederShirley BormanDorothy TebergMarjorie BrooksDorothy WendrickCharlotte FordShirley LathamMarjorie WoodrichFreshmanNumeralAwardsBASEBALLTENNISHillier BakerHarold HusumMeyer BarrashJohn JorgensenCarl Bue, Jr.Frank LazarusIrving BumsteinStephen LewellynEldward A.Walter MichelCooperriderEdward NitchieHoward KaminRobert SmidlWilliam C. KontosEarl TheimerEdward MillerHarry TullyRichard MugalianFrancis UyematsuCharles NortonTRACK ^GOLFNorman Barker, Jr,Norman Barker, Jr.Harold E. HarwoodJohn D. CulpPaul E. PaulsonJohn DrydenHarry RobertsRalph B. EttlingerForrest L. TozerRobert A. McCordRobert S. Van EttenRobert OakleyVytold YasusVytold YasusGordon M. RapierGYMNASTICSGlenn L. Moran, Jr.Henry IngwersenAlfred RoesLouis LevitWRESTLINGIsrael KoslofFQuentin M. MooreSWIMMINGFrank J. WrobelCraig Billings LemanAristoteliansBeat Sigma ChiThe Aristotelians cracked out 10hits and 10 runs in the first inning toput their game with the Sigma Chi’son ice, as they took the UniversityChampionship yesterday afternoon,19-3.Two of the 10 Aristotelians hitsmade in the first frame were homers—one by Johnson and one by IrwinSteinberg. Steinberg added anotherroundtripper in the third frame. Healso bagged a single and a double.The Sigma Chis made their firsttally in the second inning, despite thefact that the Aristoelians unrolled theSfONY/SUH/DAmd^Q'Sr.rx>unT6.in-pod./Stebhs * Chops-Barbecue-only double play in the contest. Theirsecond and third runs didn’t appearuntil the sixth and eighth frames.Joe Stampf pitched seven inningsfor the Sigs, allowing 17 hits in thisspan. Alsop, his successor, was touch¬ed for three hit and three runs.THE BESTIn Food and ServiceATStinewaysFor the finest campusFountain Service nearthe center of things,1335 E. 57thSenior Co-edsIS JUNE YOUR DEADLINE TO LAND THAT LAD? WILL YOURFOUR YEARS IN COLLEGE COME TO NOUGHT?ROMANCE BLOOMS AT PHELPS & PHELPS IN THE BLISSFULCOLONIAL DINING ROOMS SO DREAMY AND SECLUDED.LUNCHEON 35c to 75cDINNER 50c-1.25PHELPS and PHELPSCOLONIAL BESTAURANT6324 WOODLAWN AVE.Hyde Park 6324 Open 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.We cater to private parties- UNIVERSITY BOOSTERS -"Chicago's Finest and FastestCar Washing Service"10 MINUTE CONVEYOR SYSTEMCAR WASHERS INC.6000 Cottage Grove Ave.DOR. 6051ELGIN, GRUEN ANDHAMILTON WATCHESDIAMOND RINGS, SILVERWAREHousehold and Gift SuggestionsLATEST JEWELRY•J. H. WATSON1200 E. SSth STREETHyde Park's Leading JewelerTERMS IF DESIREDHARRY S. BROWNWALLPAPER: PAINTS: OILS: GLASS1307 E. 55th StreetTelephonesHyde Park 0122 Midway 0171J. H. WATSON1200 E. 55th StreetHYDE PARK'S LEADING JEWELERTerms If DesiredFor Liquid RefreshmentsTHE OLD BEAR1517 East 55th StreetTelephone Fairfax 1617FOR GOOD FOODJOIN THE CROWDAT THEPALM GROVE INNAt the Shores of Lake Michiganon 56th St•Patronize TheseBoosters olThe UniversityAUTHORIZED PHILCO-ZENITHSales & ServiceLOWE'S RADIO & RECORDSHOP1217 E. 55th StreetTelephones Midway 07I2-(I7I3THE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941Page FiveTHE DAILY MAROON SPORTSFound MemorialFor Dan HofferUndergraduates and alumni whohad gymnastics training under thelate Daniel L. Hoffer, former gym¬nastics coach at the University, havefounded a double memorial in hishonor.Headed by Erwin Beyer, presentcoach and a former National Cham¬pion under Hoffer, they intend todedicate a placque in his honor andhang it in Bartlett Gymnasium. Inaddition, a trophy, named in Hoffer’shonor, will be presented annually tothe Chicago man who places highestin the Western Conference meet.Contributions for the fund will beaccepted by the Athletic Department.Alumni WinPacked stands cheered enthusi¬astically yesterday as the alumniwon the annual Alumni-Varsitybaseball game 8-6 on GreenwoodField. Although both teams showedspotty fielding, alumni and var¬sity managed to knock out hits inspite of sterling pitching on bothsides.VARSITY AWARDSSpring Quarter1941BASEBALLMAJOR “C”OLD ENGLISH “C”PLAIN GARMENTGeorge BasichJohn Evans BeeksHarry BurkKenneth GarverickJack Lincoln FonsLuther CooperriderSeymour HirschbergRobert Scott GruhnArthur LopatkaKenneth JensenAaron MandersRobert MeyerRobert Charles MillerCarl NohlDominic ParisiWilliam OostenbrugEarl ShankenCourtney ShankenTENNISJames HillGrover DalyEdward A. IdeWalter KemetickRalph JohansonStanley LevyRobert LiftonJames McClureCalvin SawyierWilliam SelfFrancis David MartinTRACKRichard KasiusStanley ClasterAlvin ConwayRobert KincheloeTruman DahlbergRichard BlakesleeDonald MarrowRobert HixsonDonald ByesRay RandallOrville KanouseFrank HarrisonJames Lloyd RayJohn LeggittWilliam HughVincent LongRendlemanHoward WinklemanAlfred Rider, Jr.Clifford WilliamStabenauWarren Knapp WilnerJohn WilsonUNlVt»81TYTAVERN1131 & 1133 E SSth StANDLIQUOR STOREFREE DELIVERY MIDWAY 0524COMPLETE LINE OFBEER - WINES - UQUORSWE FEATUREBlotz and Siebens BeersMichigan Wins BigTen Baseball TitleMichiiran 10 2 .833Iowa T 3 .700Illinois 7 4 .636Indiana 7 6 .683Minnesota 7 6 .683Ohio State 6 6 .600Wisconsin 6 6 .466Northwestern 6 7 .417Purdue 4 8 .333Chicaso 0 12 .000With only two more games remain¬ing on the schedule the Michiganbaseball team, overlooked in pre-sea¬son dope sheets, replaces Northwest¬ern and Illinois as Big Ten champions.Combining pitching and hitting, theWolverines showed a well-balancedteam throughout the season. DickWakefield, sophomore centerfielder,was one of the big factors and alreadyhas big league scouts watching hisbat eagerly.Iowa and Ohio State meet thisATTENTIONMen Students in Education & SociologyTkart ara a faw studant counsallor positions opan at tha Univarsityof Michigan Frash Air Camp for Boys, on Pattarson Laka, 25 milesfrom Ann Arbor. Graduates and next year seniors are eligible. Sixhours univarsity credit, board, room, and lodging for regular summersession fee of $50 for out of state students. For information write Mr.Nicholas Schraibar, Lana Hall, Ann Arbor, Michigan.WORDSandUSICfor the Songs you will Hear at the SINGas well as the favorite Songsof this CAMPUSand 60 other leading Campuseswill be found in theFiftieth Anniversary Editionof theUniversity of Chicago Song Bookin Process of Publication.Leave Your Orders NOWfor one of the first copies at theU. of C. Bookstore5802 Ellisweek-end with the positions of bothteams in the balance. Ohio State canclimb into the first division by win¬ning both, which action would dropIowa to third.Smith AddressesTransfer MeetingWith Dean Leon P. Smith and apaucity of counsellors sharing thespotlight, the Transfer OrientationCommittee, headed by Jack Kneupferand Muriel Thomson, met yesterdayin Ida Noyes for the first time.A tentative program has been ar¬ranged, but the committee is issuinga call for more counsellors. Anytransfer student is eligible. Kneupfermay be contacted at InternationalHouse, and Miss Thomson at IdaNoyes.NU PI SIGMA 1941-42Virginia AllenAnn SchroederShirley BormanDorothy TebergMarjorie BrooksDorothy WendrickCharlotte FordShirley LathamMarjorie WoodrichFreshmanNumeralAwardsBASEBALLTENNISHillier BakerHarold HusumMeyer BarrashJohn JorgensenCarl Bue, Jr.Frank LazarusIrving BumsteinStephen LewellynEldward A.Walter MichelCooperriderEdward NitchieHoward KaminRobert SmidlWilliam C. KontosEarl TheimerEdward MillerHarry TullyRichard MugalianFrancis UyematsuCharles NortonTRACK ^GOLFNorman Barker, Jr,Norman Barker, Jr.Harold E. HarwoodJohn D. CulpPaul E. PaulsonJohn DrydenHarry RobertsRalph B. EttlingerForrest L. TozerRobert A. McCordRobert S. Van EttenRobert OakleyVytold YasusVytold YasusGordon M. RapierGYMNASTICSGlenn L. Moran, Jr.Henry IngwersenAlfred RoesLouis LevitWRESTLINGIsrael KoslofFQuentin M. MooreSWIMMINGFrank J. WrobelCraig Billings LemanAristoteliansBeat Sigma ChiThe Aristotelians cracked out 10hits and 10 runs in the first inning toput their game with the Sigma Chi’son ice, as they took the UniversityChampionship yesterday afternoon,19-3.Two of the 10 Aristotelians hitsmade in the first frame were homers—one by Johnson and one by IrwinSteinberg. Steinberg added anotherroundtripper in the third frame. Healso bagged a single and a double.The Sigma Chis made their firsttally in the second inning, despite thefact that the Aristoelians unrolled theSfONY/SUH/DAmd^Q'Sr.rx>unT6.in-pod./Stebhs * Chops-Barbecue-only double play in the contest. Theirsecond and third runs didn’t appearuntil the sixth and eighth frames.Joe Stampf pitched seven inningsfor the Sigs, allowing 17 hits in thisspan. Alsop, his successor, was touch¬ed for three hit and three runs.THE BESTIn Food and ServiceATStinewaysFor the finest campusFountain Service nearthe center of things,1335 E. 57thSenior Co-edsIS JUNE YOUR DEADLINE TO LAND THAT LAD? WILL YOURFOUR YEARS IN COLLEGE COME TO NOUGHT?ROMANCE BLOOMS AT PHELPS & PHELPS IN THE BLISSFULCOLONIAL DINING ROOMS SO DREAMY AND SECLUDED.LUNCHEON 35c to 75cDINNER 50c-1.25PHELPS and PHELPSCOLONIAL BESTAURANT6324 WOODLAWN AVE.Hyde Park 6324 Open 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.We cater to private parties- UNIVERSITY BOOSTERS -"Chicago's Finest and FastestCar Washing Service"10 MINUTE CONVEYOR SYSTEMCAR WASHERS INC.6000 Cottage Grove Ave.DOR. 6051ELGIN, GRUEN ANDHAMILTON WATCHESDIAMOND RINGS, SILVERWAREHousehold and Gift SuggestionsLATEST JEWELRY•J. H. WATSON1200 E. SSth STREETHyde Park's Leading JewelerTERMS IF DESIREDHARRY S. BROWNWALLPAPER: PAINTS: OILS: GLASS1307 E. 55th StreetTelephonesHyde Park 0122 Midway 0171J. H. WATSON1200 E. 55th StreetHYDE PARK'S LEADING JEWELERTerms If DesiredFor Liquid RefreshmentsTHE OLD BEAR1517 East 55th StreetTelephone Fairfax 1617FOR GOOD FOODJOIN THE CROWDAT THEPALM GROVE INNAt the Shores of Lake Michiganon 56th St•Patronize TheseBoosters olThe UniversityAUTHORIZED PHILCO-ZENITHSales & ServiceLOWE'S RADIO & RECORDSHOP1217 E. 55th StreetTelephones Midway 07I2-(I7I3Page SixTHE DAILY MARCX5N. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941WeNeedNewCoachesNed Merriam(The following tvas submitted to the Maroon unth the writer’s requestthat his name be withheld for personal reasons. The opinions herein ex¬pressed are not necessarily those of the Board of Control, old or new.)Before Herbert 0. “Friti” Crisler was signed as football coach at Mich¬igan there was a strong movement by University alumni to have him returnhere as Athletic Director and football coach. This would probably have beenthe best move Chicago could have made to strengthen its athletic depart¬ment.As matters now stand there are at least four men in the department whodo not have the respect of their teams. Atheltic Director T. Nelson Metcalfis probably the most disliked of the four. I have not yet talked to any athletehere who shows anything but disgust for the manner in which Metcalf dis¬charges the duties of his office.Despite the fact that the athletic policy is supposed to stress the valueof sports to the individual, Metcalf consistently refuses to cooperate withthe coaches in the matter of large contingents to Conference meets or toschedule trips for the various squads.Lack of PracticeThe baseball southern trip this year took the team as far as Kentuckyand lasted four days. Other Big Ten schools travel to Louisiana and spendfrom 10 to 12 days in pre-season training trips. It is no wonder the ball teamlooks so bad; they get only two or three days of practice outside of theFieldhouse before the season starts.At the time of the Illinois Relays, Coach Ned Merriam walked into Met¬calf’s office, intending to take 20 men to the meet. When he walked out, hecarried Metcalf’s permission to take five. Of course, a trip to Urbana wouldhave been so expensive.Also Merriam’s Fault'This was as much Merriam’s fault as Metcalf’s. It tsqpifies the trackcoach’s greatest fault according to his men—his lack of spirit and “back¬bone”. He lets his team run all over him. The track team probably numberedamong it, more consistent violators of training than any other team, withthe possible exception of baseball.An outstanding incident which took place early this spring also castssome reflection upon Merriam’s ability. Warren Wilner, junior quarter-miler, was practicing starts with a teammate idly watching. The teammatenoticed that there was something strange about the way in which Wilnerleft the blocks. Finally he discovered that Wilner was throwing his wrongarm forward at the start, leaving him off balance for the first four or fivesteps. And Wilner had been running under Merriam for three years withouthaving such an obvious fault Eliminated.Basketball CoachNels Norgren, one of the greatest athletes the University ever had, hascoached a basketball team which has only once in the last 10 years, risenout of last place. In 1939 Chicago finished in seventh place, winning fourConference games.Norgen’s main fault lies in the type of game he coaches. He is stillteaching a style which went out of date years ago. His slow break is nomatch for the fast-breaking fire-engine type of game, now so popular in theMiddle West.Norg’s DoingsIn the past season a few of the things “Norg” did caused many raisedeye-brows. There was treatment of Fred Shaver, potentially a fine player. Atfirst he let Shaver play his own way, then he tried to change his style ofshooting. 'This completely demoralized the sophomore and his game fell offconsiderably. And then there was the time he was drilling his team on fun¬damentals following the first Illinois game in the middle of the season.Baseball CoachLast of the quartet is Kyle Anderson. He is probably the best of the lot,but much of the baseball’s sad performance, at least this year, must beattributed to Anderson’s attitude and its subsequent effect on the morale ofthe squad.He permits very little individuality on his team. He makes most of theboys too dependent on what he says. Bob Miller, for example, when he tookover the catching assignment following George Basich’s injury would stepout of the batter’s box after almost every pitch and look over to the benchto get orders from Anderson. No team can play good ball when it is con¬stantly receiving orders from the bench.More AndersonAnd the time that a pitcher was wild; Anderson kept shouting at him“Just get it over. Put it over the heart of the plate.” After some effort thepitcher complied and the batter parked it in University Avenue for a homerun. The pitcher returned to the bench at the close of the inning, and An¬derson began berating him for putting the ball where the batter could hit it.ConclusionIf the University is to remain in the Big Ten and is to refrain fromsubsidization, the least it could do is to hire some coaches who could impartto the athletes a little of the pleasure gained from winning. There areenough good athletes here to win a few Conference games once in awhile.It would also be a much better argument for abolishing subsidization if theUniversity could show other schools that teams can win without numbering'0. . . incompetent?All Star l-M Softball TeamCatcher: Robert Lifton, Aristot¬eliansPitcher: Bernard Akwa, Aristot¬eliansPitcher: Donald Randa, Delta UPitcher: Joseph Stampf, Sigma ChiPitcher: The^ore Rosen, Phi Sig¬ma DeltaFirst Base: Harlan Naas, Delta USecond Base: Robert A. Miller,Delta Kappa Epsilon'Third Base: Harold Levin, Aris¬toteliansShortstop: Bernard Krichiver,AristoteliansLeft Field: Irwin Steinberg, Aris¬toteliansCenter Field: Ellis Steinberg, Aris¬toteliansRight Field: William Slater, ElitesShort Center Field: Earl W’heeler,Alpha Delta PhiMirror Sets DateIn March AgainAt a meeting yesterday Mirrorboard decided that its annual musicalproduction next year would be pro¬duced the first week-end in March, asusual. The board has been consideringchanging the production dates tosome time in December but afterconsidering the probable consequencesof such a move, the change wasvetoed.The theme for next year’s show hasnot yet been decided upon, and theboard would welcome suggestionsfrom any student. Authors and song¬writers are also invited to submitskits and songs for the ’42 produc¬tion.HOUSE FOR SALE9 ROOMS2 BATHSSTUDY—MmI for profottor2 CAR GARAGENmt Cdmpui and I. C.Call Midway 4196paid athletes among its ranks.As I Was Saying-Bob LawsonEvery time awards are announcedthere are some gripes. This year iscertainly no exception. It is hard tosee how the athletic department couldcome up with some of the weird de¬cisions which are embodied in the listof awanis, given elsewhere on thispage.We can start with baseball. It isdifficult to see why Bill Oostenbrugreceived only a minor award. Oosten¬brug played in all but the last fourgames. Surely, he should be entitledto a major “C” for that. His per¬formance at the first base positionwas not always what it should be, ad¬mitted. But he tried all the time.Tennis OkayCoach Wally Hebert handed out apretty fair deal in tennis. It was un¬fortunate, however, that Ralph Jo-hanson didn’t see more action duringthe season. He wound up in a blazeof glory, winning the Number Sixchampionship in the Conference meethere last week.Track from a casual examinationseems to include some strange deci¬sions. Trudy Dahlberg certainly de¬serves better than an Old English“C”. He is the best two-miler on thesquad, and is also a fair miler. Heran well all during the season, gainedquite a few points, and was alwaystrying his best.More InjusticeBut seeing Dick Blakeslee, DonBoyes, and Frank Harrison on thelist to receive just plain garmentsseems rank injustice. This is theaward usually given just to men toreward them for consistent attend¬ance at practice and that’s all. Andthese three deserve better breaks thanthat.Blakeslee reported as a 440-manand was being shifted about duringmuch of the indoor season. He finallyreturned to his first love and ran sec¬ond leg on the mile relay team whichjust missed placing in the Conferenceoutdoor meet. He seems to merit morethan an award for perserverance.Don Boyes picked up points hereand there in the hurdles and com¬peted in most of the meets. FrankHarrison ran a few times on the re¬lay team.Harrison UnluckiestHarrison’s case is really the mostunfortunate of the lot. He is a senior.Looking down the list of major “C”winners, it is easy to spot men whohave been placed there merely be¬cause they were seniors. It wouldhave been very simple to ease Har¬rison’s name up a notch even if hedidn’t deserve it. But of course thisis a very impersonal University, andbesides sports are to be indulged inonly for their inherent good.Awards and such things meannothing here. If a person gets enjoy¬ment out of competing, any officialrecognition by the University of hisachievements is merely anti-climactic.That’s what they say around theQuadrangles, and if you don’t believeit, I wouldn’t advise you to ask one ofthe above-mentioned boys for con¬firmation.A Roomy HOMEY FumishodCOHAGEAttractively located on woodedknoll bordering golf course and 300yds. from Lake Michigan. All util¬ities: double garage; commutingdistance from campus. Bargain—Rent or Sale. Inquire H. F. Mal¬lory, Grand Beach, Mich.CLO-RNZHEADS THEGRADUATING CLASSOaans of Fashion Makaup fromcoast to coast award GLO-RNZtha highast dagraa for hairbaauty. GLO-RNZ, tha profas-sional hair tint rinta, hat baancommandad for its axcaliant work in rastoring duH, fadad, andstraaked hair that has baan hard to managa to a lovaly.natural looking color. Fashion-wisa coads usa GLO-RNZ. Thayknow it fraas hair from harmful alkali and soap scums, making itaasiar to wava. Add to your lovalinass. Next tima, ask yourhairdrassar for a GLO-RNZ.Win'te Today for Purse-size Booklet,"How to Here Lovely H^r"ncDT V 1424 COURT PLACEUtr I. A OENVER, COLORADOCIO-RKZGIO-RNZ Strvict is AvoiloUt in B«ovty Shops EvorywhortGIORKY YOUR HAIR WITH GIO-RNZ .... IT COSTS SO lITTlEFrank Lynch SucceedsMathews As I-M ChairmanJoe StampfFrank Lynch, a Deke, will be nextyear’s Student Chairman of the In¬tramural Department, Bob Mathews,retiring head, announced yesterday.Don Warfield, also of the Dekes, andA1 Schnoor of the Kappa Sigs, willbe Senior Board Members.Intra-Mural Organization PointsFinal StandingDelta Kappa Epsilon ....Alpha Delta PhiDelta UpsilonElitesPhi Kappa PsiPhi Delta ThetaPhi Sigma DeltaJailbirds ....Kappa Sigma1292'/21245114511051022957«/2885CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHESTO GRADUATES OFTHECLASS OF 1941LACLEDE-CHRISTYCHICAGOPage SixTHE DAILY MARCX5N. FRIDAY. JUNE 6. 1941WeNeedNewCoachesNed Merriam(The following tvas submitted to the Maroon unth the writer’s requestthat his name be withheld for personal reasons. The opinions herein ex¬pressed are not necessarily those of the Board of Control, old or new.)Before Herbert 0. “Friti” Crisler was signed as football coach at Mich¬igan there was a strong movement by University alumni to have him returnhere as Athletic Director and football coach. This would probably have beenthe best move Chicago could have made to strengthen its athletic depart¬ment.As matters now stand there are at least four men in the department whodo not have the respect of their teams. Atheltic Director T. Nelson Metcalfis probably the most disliked of the four. I have not yet talked to any athletehere who shows anything but disgust for the manner in which Metcalf dis¬charges the duties of his office.Despite the fact that the athletic policy is supposed to stress the valueof sports to the individual, Metcalf consistently refuses to cooperate withthe coaches in the matter of large contingents to Conference meets or toschedule trips for the various squads.Lack of PracticeThe baseball southern trip this year took the team as far as Kentuckyand lasted four days. Other Big Ten schools travel to Louisiana and spendfrom 10 to 12 days in pre-season training trips. It is no wonder the ball teamlooks so bad; they get only two or three days of practice outside of theFieldhouse before the season starts.At the time of the Illinois Relays, Coach Ned Merriam walked into Met¬calf’s office, intending to take 20 men to the meet. When he walked out, hecarried Metcalf’s permission to take five. Of course, a trip to Urbana wouldhave been so expensive.Also Merriam’s Fault'This was as much Merriam’s fault as Metcalf’s. It tsqpifies the trackcoach’s greatest fault according to his men—his lack of spirit and “back¬bone”. He lets his team run all over him. The track team probably numberedamong it, more consistent violators of training than any other team, withthe possible exception of baseball.An outstanding incident which took place early this spring also castssome reflection upon Merriam’s ability. Warren Wilner, junior quarter-miler, was practicing starts with a teammate idly watching. The teammatenoticed that there was something strange about the way in which Wilnerleft the blocks. Finally he discovered that Wilner was throwing his wrongarm forward at the start, leaving him off balance for the first four or fivesteps. And Wilner had been running under Merriam for three years withouthaving such an obvious fault Eliminated.Basketball CoachNels Norgren, one of the greatest athletes the University ever had, hascoached a basketball team which has only once in the last 10 years, risenout of last place. In 1939 Chicago finished in seventh place, winning fourConference games.Norgen’s main fault lies in the type of game he coaches. He is stillteaching a style which went out of date years ago. His slow break is nomatch for the fast-breaking fire-engine type of game, now so popular in theMiddle West.Norg’s DoingsIn the past season a few of the things “Norg” did caused many raisedeye-brows. There was treatment of Fred Shaver, potentially a fine player. Atfirst he let Shaver play his own way, then he tried to change his style ofshooting. 'This completely demoralized the sophomore and his game fell offconsiderably. And then there was the time he was drilling his team on fun¬damentals following the first Illinois game in the middle of the season.Baseball CoachLast of the quartet is Kyle Anderson. He is probably the best of the lot,but much of the baseball’s sad performance, at least this year, must beattributed to Anderson’s attitude and its subsequent effect on the morale ofthe squad.He permits very little individuality on his team. He makes most of theboys too dependent on what he says. Bob Miller, for example, when he tookover the catching assignment following George Basich’s injury would stepout of the batter’s box after almost every pitch and look over to the benchto get orders from Anderson. No team can play good ball when it is con¬stantly receiving orders from the bench.More AndersonAnd the time that a pitcher was wild; Anderson kept shouting at him“Just get it over. Put it over the heart of the plate.” After some effort thepitcher complied and the batter parked it in University Avenue for a homerun. The pitcher returned to the bench at the close of the inning, and An¬derson began berating him for putting the ball where the batter could hit it.ConclusionIf the University is to remain in the Big Ten and is to refrain fromsubsidization, the least it could do is to hire some coaches who could impartto the athletes a little of the pleasure gained from winning. There areenough good athletes here to win a few Conference games once in awhile.It would also be a much better argument for abolishing subsidization if theUniversity could show other schools that teams can win without numbering'0. . . incompetent?All Star l-M Softball TeamCatcher: Robert Lifton, Aristot¬eliansPitcher: Bernard Akwa, Aristot¬eliansPitcher: Donald Randa, Delta UPitcher: Joseph Stampf, Sigma ChiPitcher: The^ore Rosen, Phi Sig¬ma DeltaFirst Base: Harlan Naas, Delta USecond Base: Robert A. Miller,Delta Kappa Epsilon'Third Base: Harold Levin, Aris¬toteliansShortstop: Bernard Krichiver,AristoteliansLeft Field: Irwin Steinberg, Aris¬toteliansCenter Field: Ellis Steinberg, Aris¬toteliansRight Field: William Slater, ElitesShort Center Field: Earl W’heeler,Alpha Delta PhiMirror Sets DateIn March AgainAt a meeting yesterday Mirrorboard decided that its annual musicalproduction next year would be pro¬duced the first week-end in March, asusual. The board has been consideringchanging the production dates tosome time in December but afterconsidering the probable consequencesof such a move, the change wasvetoed.The theme for next year’s show hasnot yet been decided upon, and theboard would welcome suggestionsfrom any student. Authors and song¬writers are also invited to submitskits and songs for the ’42 produc¬tion.HOUSE FOR SALE9 ROOMS2 BATHSSTUDY—MmI for profottor2 CAR GARAGENmt Cdmpui and I. C.Call Midway 4196paid athletes among its ranks.As I Was Saying-Bob LawsonEvery time awards are announcedthere are some gripes. This year iscertainly no exception. It is hard tosee how the athletic department couldcome up with some of the weird de¬cisions which are embodied in the listof awanis, given elsewhere on thispage.We can start with baseball. It isdifficult to see why Bill Oostenbrugreceived only a minor award. Oosten¬brug played in all but the last fourgames. Surely, he should be entitledto a major “C” for that. His per¬formance at the first base positionwas not always what it should be, ad¬mitted. But he tried all the time.Tennis OkayCoach Wally Hebert handed out apretty fair deal in tennis. It was un¬fortunate, however, that Ralph Jo-hanson didn’t see more action duringthe season. He wound up in a blazeof glory, winning the Number Sixchampionship in the Conference meethere last week.Track from a casual examinationseems to include some strange deci¬sions. Trudy Dahlberg certainly de¬serves better than an Old English“C”. He is the best two-miler on thesquad, and is also a fair miler. Heran well all during the season, gainedquite a few points, and was alwaystrying his best.More InjusticeBut seeing Dick Blakeslee, DonBoyes, and Frank Harrison on thelist to receive just plain garmentsseems rank injustice. This is theaward usually given just to men toreward them for consistent attend¬ance at practice and that’s all. Andthese three deserve better breaks thanthat.Blakeslee reported as a 440-manand was being shifted about duringmuch of the indoor season. He finallyreturned to his first love and ran sec¬ond leg on the mile relay team whichjust missed placing in the Conferenceoutdoor meet. He seems to merit morethan an award for perserverance.Don Boyes picked up points hereand there in the hurdles and com¬peted in most of the meets. FrankHarrison ran a few times on the re¬lay team.Harrison UnluckiestHarrison’s case is really the mostunfortunate of the lot. He is a senior.Looking down the list of major “C”winners, it is easy to spot men whohave been placed there merely be¬cause they were seniors. It wouldhave been very simple to ease Har¬rison’s name up a notch even if hedidn’t deserve it. But of course thisis a very impersonal University, andbesides sports are to be indulged inonly for their inherent good.Awards and such things meannothing here. If a person gets enjoy¬ment out of competing, any officialrecognition by the University of hisachievements is merely anti-climactic.That’s what they say around theQuadrangles, and if you don’t believeit, I wouldn’t advise you to ask one ofthe above-mentioned boys for con¬firmation.A Roomy HOMEY FumishodCOHAGEAttractively located on woodedknoll bordering golf course and 300yds. from Lake Michigan. All util¬ities: double garage; commutingdistance from campus. Bargain—Rent or Sale. Inquire H. F. Mal¬lory, Grand Beach, Mich.CLO-RNZHEADS THEGRADUATING CLASSOaans of Fashion Makaup fromcoast to coast award GLO-RNZtha highast dagraa for hairbaauty. GLO-RNZ, tha profas-sional hair tint rinta, hat baancommandad for its axcaliant work in rastoring duH, fadad, andstraaked hair that has baan hard to managa to a lovaly.natural looking color. Fashion-wisa coads usa GLO-RNZ. Thayknow it fraas hair from harmful alkali and soap scums, making itaasiar to wava. Add to your lovalinass. Next tima, ask yourhairdrassar for a GLO-RNZ.Win'te Today for Purse-size Booklet,"How to Here Lovely H^r"ncDT V 1424 COURT PLACEUtr I. A OENVER, COLORADOCIO-RKZGIO-RNZ Strvict is AvoiloUt in B«ovty Shops EvorywhortGIORKY YOUR HAIR WITH GIO-RNZ .... IT COSTS SO lITTlEFrank Lynch SucceedsMathews As I-M ChairmanJoe StampfFrank Lynch, a Deke, will be nextyear’s Student Chairman of the In¬tramural Department, Bob Mathews,retiring head, announced yesterday.Don Warfield, also of the Dekes, andA1 Schnoor of the Kappa Sigs, willbe Senior Board Members.Intra-Mural Organization PointsFinal StandingDelta Kappa Epsilon ....Alpha Delta PhiDelta UpsilonElitesPhi Kappa PsiPhi Delta ThetaPhi Sigma DeltaJailbirds ....Kappa Sigma1292'/21245114511051022957«/2885CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHESTO GRADUATES OFTHECLASS OF 1941LACLEDE-CHRISTYCHICAGO