IVol. 41, No. 96 Z-149THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. TUESDAY. APRIL 22. 1941Price Three Cents ^Peace Group Goes ToBattle Over CrossesOxie See KappaAlpha Psi JoinNU l-F CouncilBy ELIZABETH JANE WATERSHavoc came close to prevailing lastFriday afternoon in the circle, ac¬cording to members of the CampusPeace Committee when a group ofstudents, in expressing their opinionon war and peace, proceeded to re¬move the crosses from the circle, andupon being questioned by members ofthe Campus Peace Committee dis¬played their resistance to hindrance—and peace—by resorting to physicalviolence.All had been allegedly quiet in thecircle’s reasonable facsimile of Fland-er’s Field when the peace-objectingstudents drove up in a car and com¬menced to taka the crosses down.Members of the Campus Peace Com¬mittee, which had placed the crossesin the circle last week as a demonstra¬tion in preparation for the April 23Peace Strike, April 23, said that theyob.served the action and requested thatthe crosses be replaced, also askingthe intruders their reason for remov¬ing them.Fighting BeginsMcnnentarily submitting to thePeace Committee’s plea, the objectorsto the crosses ceased their actions butin a very few minutes returned tooccupy themselves with again tearingthe crosses from the grass. Whenagain questioned by the representa¬tives of the Peace Committee, theyrefused to submit, and one of thegroup became the instigator of thehand-to-hand fighting which followedimmediately.No members of the Campus PoliceForce were on hand at the moment,but some students had gone in searchof Guy R. Lyman, inspector of serviceof B. and G. In the meantime, it hadbeen suggested to the disturbers thatif they felt they had legitimategrounds for their actions, they shouldwait and express their views andexpress their views and rights to Mr.Lyman. However, by the time Lymanappt‘art*d most of the group had dis¬banded.MagazineAttacksHutchins“The Truth About Hutchins,” a re¬cent article in the Student Advocate,national American Student Union pub¬lication, attacks Hutchins and theUniversity for allegedly “advocating aprogram of education that would doHitler credit,”, “seeing to it that theUniversity is kept vigorously anti¬union”, “being one of the most activeforces in maintaining the infamouspolicy of restrictive covenants”, “dis¬criminating against Negro students”,and “turning the University into anarsenal in this period of hysteria.”The article published in an issue ofthe Advocate dated for March 29, theMaroon learned yesterday was writ¬ten by four members of the campuschapter of the A.S.U. They wrote onthe different aspects of the Univer¬sity in reTation to Negroes, Hutchins’speech and philosophy, his educationaltheory, and the armament program.In a “box” at the top of the article isa list of some of the members of theBoard of Trustees giving their al¬leged financial connections for whomthe article claims Hutchins “admin¬isters.”Particularly emphasized are theclaimed bad effects of Neo-Thomistphilosophy at the University. “SinceHutchins’ arrival,” says the article,“the University has become knownthroughout the world as the seat of“neo scholasticism,” a philosophy bas¬ed on the writings of the scholasticsof the Middle Ages. . . . Faith andknowledge are supposed to be intui¬tively derived and immediately ap¬prehended . . . this intuition is sup¬posed to be of much greater impor¬tance than knowledge based on merefact or experimental evidence.”Martin N. Freeman, the Univer¬sity’s official entrance counselor, isbusy laying plans for the high schoolseniors who will visit the Quadranglesover the week-end to view Blackfriarsand get a quick look at life on theMidway campus.Elect CornwallNew ReynoldsClub PresidentKenneth Cornwall was elected Pres¬ident of the Reynolds Club Councilfor the coming year at the home ofHoward Mort, Director, Sunday, April20. Cornwall will succeed the presenthead and Business Manager of Capand Gown, Jack Crane.The other council members appoint¬ed to the Central Committee are Har¬old Steffee, Secretary-Treasurer; BobCummins, Social Chairman; Dick Mer-rifield, in charge of Stags; MortonPierce, in charge of Publicity; Theo¬dore Zurawic, in charge of Tourna¬ments. Although no restrictions areplaced on the other officers, the Pres¬ident and Secretary-Treasurer mustbe recruited from the Senior Class.Award KeysFollowing the election, ReynoldsClub keys were awarded to four coun¬cil members in recognition of out¬standing service rendered during thelast year. The recipients were DickMerrifield, Jack Brown, Wilson Reilly,and Harold Steffee.The past year has been one of themost active in the Council’s four yearsof existence. Especially notable havebeen the stags. The biggest stag ofthe year was when the club succeededin bringing together President Hutch-(Continued on page three)The public got its first glimpse ofthe cast of “Dust It Off” FridayNight. In the late floor show at theEdgewater Beach Hotel, the Black-friar troupers rounded out Universitynight with three numbers from the1941 show.Eddie Armstrong and Ruth Wehlanpinch-hitting for the glamorous PunkWarfield, led off with “Life Ain’t Likethe Movies.” The golden-voiced Arm¬strong then soloed “They’re You”over the mike. The final number, achorus routine with eight scantily-clad, high-kicking chorines, broughthowls of approval. Their number last¬ed for more than five minutes, for thelarge audience interrupted repeatedly,demanding repetition of several se¬quences. When Duval Jaros, owner ofthe “most gorgeous gams” in thechorus, kicked a high-heeled shoe farout into the audience, the house near¬ly came down.Oxie O’Rourk sulked into the CSoph, grabbed a check out of Annie’shand and dropped down at our table.“The old place somehow doesn’t lookthe same today,” he began, sadly look¬ing around at the usual afternooncrowd, “Been doing a little plumbingout at that there Evanston tradeschool they calls Northwestern and itssort of got me mixed up.”“You know,” he said after waddinghis check up into a little pellet andthrowing it at a sleeping Psi U, “I wasmonkeying around with a radiatoroutside the “Daily Northwestern” andI hears two of the freshmen laughingat their editorial writer for sayingthe Inter-Fraternity Council shouldlet the negro fraternity. Kappa AlphaPsi, come around and meet with therest of the boys.”It’s A Riot“It’s a positive riot,” the first onebegins, “If they had any sense they'dknow none of the real frat boys wouldstand for that.”“Sure,” the other chimes in almostin hysterics, “Look at Chicago. Everyone knows that they’re nothing but abunch of reds down there and they’vebeen trying for years to get the localchapter recognized by the Council.”“You’re right,” the first howls, wip¬ing the tears from his face, “Here itis their first year on our campus andthey think that they have a chance atmaking I-F.”Oxie snagged a piece of ice out ofmy coke glass, sucked on it pensivelyand then continued, “When I hearshow they talk about us down here onthe Midway I feels sort of proud butI am a mite upset when I picks up thepaper next morning and sees that theCouncil has upped and elected KappaAlpha whatever it is right up next tothe rest of the bunch. I don’t get muchchance to think about it cause I’msent downtown to look at some fix¬tures in the city hall, but about twoweeks later the same radiator startssquirting steam again and they asksme down to take a look.”He Sees The Same Two“I sees the same two freshmen comein only this time they ain’t laughing.It seems like they’re sort of tiredcause they was at the Inter-Fratern¬ity Ball the night before at theStevens Hotel. One is talking abouthow he saw two negro couples at thedance and he didn’t see how they wascausing anybody any trouble. Thereal blow, though, comes when I hearthat even'before the boys did theirbit the girls has elected. Alpha KappaAlpha, the negro sorority, into fullmembership in what they calls thePan-Hellenic Council.”Oxie sunk further in his chair andyawned, “I always likes it here butI’m beginning to wonder if maybeI shouldn’t see if there ain’t someplace like the Coffee Shop in Evan¬ston.”Co-Author Dave Martin announcesanother addition to the cast. “Major”,mascot of the Alpha Delt house, ap¬pears in the hilarious scene “On theWings of An Airplane”. “Major” willwear wings, as will the other actors.Ingenious plan to get the DobermannPresident of the Council for nextPinscher to wander around the stageis to hold the dog on one side, holdDick Philbrick on the other. Philbrickholds a mysterious fascination for“Major”; when the dog’s custodianlet’s him go, he trails his wings rightacross the stage to his beloved Phil¬brick.—Blackfriars wants applicants forscore girls. Each club will presentseveral names for this. Thesenames must be turned in to theBlackfriars’ Office or ReynoldsDesk not later than Thursday noon.Blackfriars TroupePuts On PreviewStudents Protest DeanRandall's 'Anti-Negro'Action; See HutchinsWright Electedl-C PresidentBob Wright, this year’s treasurer ofInterchurch council, has been electedPresident of the Council for the nextyear. A senior in the four year col¬lege, Wright has been the Westminis¬ter Group’s representative on Inter¬church Council.The new secretary, Barbara Hei¬berg, represented the council at theInterchurch Conference at Naper¬ville. She is the Baptist’s delegateon the Interchurch board. FreshmanOtto Trippel, who is also a member ofthe Westminister Group, is the newtreasurer.Coulton Speaks onMedieval Art inMandel Hall TodayG. G. Coulton, eminent Englishmedieval scholar, will give an il¬lustrated public lecture on “Symbol¬ism in Medieval Art” at the Univer¬sity today in Leon Mandel Hall.Dr. Coulton is a fellow of St. John’scollege, Cambridge, England, andvisiting professor of Medieval Historyat Toronto university. The 83-year-old scholar is the author of “Chaucerand His England,” “Medieval Stud¬ies,” “Five Centuries of Religion,”and other works dealing with theMiddle Ages.The lecture is under the auspices ofthe William Vaughn Moody Founda¬tion. Tickets may be obtained withoutcharge after April 26 at the Informa¬tion office.President Promises to Inves¬tigate; Group Will MeetThursday.Protesting against the “anti-Negro”action of Dean Randall, who, accord¬ing to the Daily Maroon issues of lastThursday and Friday, revealed that “6Negro Communists” littered the cam¬pus one night with papers as a protestagainst the campus anti-pamphletlaw, a group of 60 students visitedPresident Hutchins last Friday andurged him to investigate the matter.Dean Randall has denied any def¬inite knowledge of the identity of thevandals, according to Maroon articles.Form CommitteeThe students formulated a tempo¬rary committee, the members ofwhich saw Hutchins and asked himwhether he had read the Maroon ar¬ticles, and what he thought of DeanRandall’s action, and his opinionswere of Negro discrimination in gen¬eral.Hutchins answered that he did notread the articles, that he was againstNegro discrimination, and that hewould investigate the matter and sub¬mit a report of his inqueries to thespokesman of the group, who is BillStarke.Temporary CommitteeMembers of the temporary commit¬tee are. Bill Starke, chairman, BettyFarrow, Sylvia Gordon, Caroline Baer,Robert Richman, Lincoln Wolfenstein,Efram Ostrow, and Jerome Kraus.The group will meet this Thursdayat 3:30 in Lounge A of the ReynoldsClub at which time they plan to setup a permanent committee along linessimilar to the temporary committee.The meeting is open to all campusstudents.Magazine Asks Girls,Girls Tell MagazineBy BEATA MUELLERAccording to the Good Housekeep¬ing survey of college girl opinion, al¬most every woman on this campuswould feel obliged to feed her mansteak if she invited him to dinner.There was one exception who offeredfrog legs.Most girls here want their mothersto drink and smoke, wear sensibleshoes, and listen to their adolescentdissertations on “friends, dates, aca¬demic problems, careers, love, religion,ethics...”Flying Course toContinue DuringSummer QuarterIn co-operation with the Civil Aero¬nautics Administration the Universitywill continue during the summer itsCivilian Pilot’s Training course at theFord-Lansing airport. Ground schoolclasses are on the University Quad¬rangles. Flight-instruction in Univer¬sity-owned airplanes in both prelim¬inary and advanced courses will beconducted at the airport, near Lans¬ing, Ill.The preliminary course covers 72hours of ground school instruction and25 to 45 hours of flight instruction.'The secondary couj’se includes 126hours of ground school and 40 hoursof flight instruction. Both courses areopen to men. and women who passgovernment physical requirements.Mental GiantsMost of their mothers, in turn ex¬pected them to be mental giants, so¬cial successes, career women, andhomebodies. As one of the girls said,filling out all three, “No wonder I’mmaladjusted.”Most girls read Esquire, the comics,the war news. Life, and the New Yor¬ker. One or two, possibly as a con¬cession to the title of the question¬naire, claimed to read Good House¬keeping.One year after graduation, the ma¬jority expect to hold down a “goodjob,” and ten years after graduationthey intend to be married and raisingfrom one to twelve children. Theyhope for a minimum weekly income of$25 to $40, to begin with, and wouldprefer not to work after marriage.Commented Dick Philbrick, “$26 to$40, rot! My wife is going to supportme, and in the style to which I’maccustomed.”Canopied BedsPreferences in furnishings variedfrom Swedish Modern to 17th centuryItalian, with knick-knacks. One filler-outer expressed a yearning for a can¬opy over her bed, understandable ifshe is a dormitory resident. Another,answering “WTiat do you wish yourroom had that is missing?” answered“Bedfellow.”Favorite sports indicated varied—golf, swimming, tennis, bowling, bad¬minton, and hiking. Only one re¬bellious soul answered tersely, “scull¬ing, sex.”IVol. 41, No. 96 Z-149THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. TUESDAY. APRIL 22. 1941Price Three Cents ^Peace Group Goes ToBattle Over CrossesOxie See KappaAlpha Psi JoinNU l-F CouncilBy ELIZABETH JANE WATERSHavoc came close to prevailing lastFriday afternoon in the circle, ac¬cording to members of the CampusPeace Committee when a group ofstudents, in expressing their opinionon war and peace, proceeded to re¬move the crosses from the circle, andupon being questioned by members ofthe Campus Peace Committee dis¬played their resistance to hindrance—and peace—by resorting to physicalviolence.All had been allegedly quiet in thecircle’s reasonable facsimile of Fland-er’s Field when the peace-objectingstudents drove up in a car and com¬menced to taka the crosses down.Members of the Campus Peace Com¬mittee, which had placed the crossesin the circle last week as a demonstra¬tion in preparation for the April 23Peace Strike, April 23, said that theyob.served the action and requested thatthe crosses be replaced, also askingthe intruders their reason for remov¬ing them.Fighting BeginsMcnnentarily submitting to thePeace Committee’s plea, the objectorsto the crosses ceased their actions butin a very few minutes returned tooccupy themselves with again tearingthe crosses from the grass. Whenagain questioned by the representa¬tives of the Peace Committee, theyrefused to submit, and one of thegroup became the instigator of thehand-to-hand fighting which followedimmediately.No members of the Campus PoliceForce were on hand at the moment,but some students had gone in searchof Guy R. Lyman, inspector of serviceof B. and G. In the meantime, it hadbeen suggested to the disturbers thatif they felt they had legitimategrounds for their actions, they shouldwait and express their views andexpress their views and rights to Mr.Lyman. However, by the time Lymanappt‘art*d most of the group had dis¬banded.MagazineAttacksHutchins“The Truth About Hutchins,” a re¬cent article in the Student Advocate,national American Student Union pub¬lication, attacks Hutchins and theUniversity for allegedly “advocating aprogram of education that would doHitler credit,”, “seeing to it that theUniversity is kept vigorously anti¬union”, “being one of the most activeforces in maintaining the infamouspolicy of restrictive covenants”, “dis¬criminating against Negro students”,and “turning the University into anarsenal in this period of hysteria.”The article published in an issue ofthe Advocate dated for March 29, theMaroon learned yesterday was writ¬ten by four members of the campuschapter of the A.S.U. They wrote onthe different aspects of the Univer¬sity in reTation to Negroes, Hutchins’speech and philosophy, his educationaltheory, and the armament program.In a “box” at the top of the article isa list of some of the members of theBoard of Trustees giving their al¬leged financial connections for whomthe article claims Hutchins “admin¬isters.”Particularly emphasized are theclaimed bad effects of Neo-Thomistphilosophy at the University. “SinceHutchins’ arrival,” says the article,“the University has become knownthroughout the world as the seat of“neo scholasticism,” a philosophy bas¬ed on the writings of the scholasticsof the Middle Ages. . . . Faith andknowledge are supposed to be intui¬tively derived and immediately ap¬prehended . . . this intuition is sup¬posed to be of much greater impor¬tance than knowledge based on merefact or experimental evidence.”Martin N. Freeman, the Univer¬sity’s official entrance counselor, isbusy laying plans for the high schoolseniors who will visit the Quadranglesover the week-end to view Blackfriarsand get a quick look at life on theMidway campus.Elect CornwallNew ReynoldsClub PresidentKenneth Cornwall was elected Pres¬ident of the Reynolds Club Councilfor the coming year at the home ofHoward Mort, Director, Sunday, April20. Cornwall will succeed the presenthead and Business Manager of Capand Gown, Jack Crane.The other council members appoint¬ed to the Central Committee are Har¬old Steffee, Secretary-Treasurer; BobCummins, Social Chairman; Dick Mer-rifield, in charge of Stags; MortonPierce, in charge of Publicity; Theo¬dore Zurawic, in charge of Tourna¬ments. Although no restrictions areplaced on the other officers, the Pres¬ident and Secretary-Treasurer mustbe recruited from the Senior Class.Award KeysFollowing the election, ReynoldsClub keys were awarded to four coun¬cil members in recognition of out¬standing service rendered during thelast year. The recipients were DickMerrifield, Jack Brown, Wilson Reilly,and Harold Steffee.The past year has been one of themost active in the Council’s four yearsof existence. Especially notable havebeen the stags. The biggest stag ofthe year was when the club succeededin bringing together President Hutch-(Continued on page three)The public got its first glimpse ofthe cast of “Dust It Off” FridayNight. In the late floor show at theEdgewater Beach Hotel, the Black-friar troupers rounded out Universitynight with three numbers from the1941 show.Eddie Armstrong and Ruth Wehlanpinch-hitting for the glamorous PunkWarfield, led off with “Life Ain’t Likethe Movies.” The golden-voiced Arm¬strong then soloed “They’re You”over the mike. The final number, achorus routine with eight scantily-clad, high-kicking chorines, broughthowls of approval. Their number last¬ed for more than five minutes, for thelarge audience interrupted repeatedly,demanding repetition of several se¬quences. When Duval Jaros, owner ofthe “most gorgeous gams” in thechorus, kicked a high-heeled shoe farout into the audience, the house near¬ly came down.Oxie O’Rourk sulked into the CSoph, grabbed a check out of Annie’shand and dropped down at our table.“The old place somehow doesn’t lookthe same today,” he began, sadly look¬ing around at the usual afternooncrowd, “Been doing a little plumbingout at that there Evanston tradeschool they calls Northwestern and itssort of got me mixed up.”“You know,” he said after waddinghis check up into a little pellet andthrowing it at a sleeping Psi U, “I wasmonkeying around with a radiatoroutside the “Daily Northwestern” andI hears two of the freshmen laughingat their editorial writer for sayingthe Inter-Fraternity Council shouldlet the negro fraternity. Kappa AlphaPsi, come around and meet with therest of the boys.”It’s A Riot“It’s a positive riot,” the first onebegins, “If they had any sense they'dknow none of the real frat boys wouldstand for that.”“Sure,” the other chimes in almostin hysterics, “Look at Chicago. Everyone knows that they’re nothing but abunch of reds down there and they’vebeen trying for years to get the localchapter recognized by the Council.”“You’re right,” the first howls, wip¬ing the tears from his face, “Here itis their first year on our campus andthey think that they have a chance atmaking I-F.”Oxie snagged a piece of ice out ofmy coke glass, sucked on it pensivelyand then continued, “When I hearshow they talk about us down here onthe Midway I feels sort of proud butI am a mite upset when I picks up thepaper next morning and sees that theCouncil has upped and elected KappaAlpha whatever it is right up next tothe rest of the bunch. I don’t get muchchance to think about it cause I’msent downtown to look at some fix¬tures in the city hall, but about twoweeks later the same radiator startssquirting steam again and they asksme down to take a look.”He Sees The Same Two“I sees the same two freshmen comein only this time they ain’t laughing.It seems like they’re sort of tiredcause they was at the Inter-Fratern¬ity Ball the night before at theStevens Hotel. One is talking abouthow he saw two negro couples at thedance and he didn’t see how they wascausing anybody any trouble. Thereal blow, though, comes when I hearthat even'before the boys did theirbit the girls has elected. Alpha KappaAlpha, the negro sorority, into fullmembership in what they calls thePan-Hellenic Council.”Oxie sunk further in his chair andyawned, “I always likes it here butI’m beginning to wonder if maybeI shouldn’t see if there ain’t someplace like the Coffee Shop in Evan¬ston.”Co-Author Dave Martin announcesanother addition to the cast. “Major”,mascot of the Alpha Delt house, ap¬pears in the hilarious scene “On theWings of An Airplane”. “Major” willwear wings, as will the other actors.Ingenious plan to get the DobermannPresident of the Council for nextPinscher to wander around the stageis to hold the dog on one side, holdDick Philbrick on the other. Philbrickholds a mysterious fascination for“Major”; when the dog’s custodianlet’s him go, he trails his wings rightacross the stage to his beloved Phil¬brick.—Blackfriars wants applicants forscore girls. Each club will presentseveral names for this. Thesenames must be turned in to theBlackfriars’ Office or ReynoldsDesk not later than Thursday noon.Blackfriars TroupePuts On PreviewStudents Protest DeanRandall's 'Anti-Negro'Action; See HutchinsWright Electedl-C PresidentBob Wright, this year’s treasurer ofInterchurch council, has been electedPresident of the Council for the nextyear. A senior in the four year col¬lege, Wright has been the Westminis¬ter Group’s representative on Inter¬church Council.The new secretary, Barbara Hei¬berg, represented the council at theInterchurch Conference at Naper¬ville. She is the Baptist’s delegateon the Interchurch board. FreshmanOtto Trippel, who is also a member ofthe Westminister Group, is the newtreasurer.Coulton Speaks onMedieval Art inMandel Hall TodayG. G. Coulton, eminent Englishmedieval scholar, will give an il¬lustrated public lecture on “Symbol¬ism in Medieval Art” at the Univer¬sity today in Leon Mandel Hall.Dr. Coulton is a fellow of St. John’scollege, Cambridge, England, andvisiting professor of Medieval Historyat Toronto university. The 83-year-old scholar is the author of “Chaucerand His England,” “Medieval Stud¬ies,” “Five Centuries of Religion,”and other works dealing with theMiddle Ages.The lecture is under the auspices ofthe William Vaughn Moody Founda¬tion. Tickets may be obtained withoutcharge after April 26 at the Informa¬tion office.President Promises to Inves¬tigate; Group Will MeetThursday.Protesting against the “anti-Negro”action of Dean Randall, who, accord¬ing to the Daily Maroon issues of lastThursday and Friday, revealed that “6Negro Communists” littered the cam¬pus one night with papers as a protestagainst the campus anti-pamphletlaw, a group of 60 students visitedPresident Hutchins last Friday andurged him to investigate the matter.Dean Randall has denied any def¬inite knowledge of the identity of thevandals, according to Maroon articles.Form CommitteeThe students formulated a tempo¬rary committee, the members ofwhich saw Hutchins and asked himwhether he had read the Maroon ar¬ticles, and what he thought of DeanRandall’s action, and his opinionswere of Negro discrimination in gen¬eral.Hutchins answered that he did notread the articles, that he was againstNegro discrimination, and that hewould investigate the matter and sub¬mit a report of his inqueries to thespokesman of the group, who is BillStarke.Temporary CommitteeMembers of the temporary commit¬tee are. Bill Starke, chairman, BettyFarrow, Sylvia Gordon, Caroline Baer,Robert Richman, Lincoln Wolfenstein,Efram Ostrow, and Jerome Kraus.The group will meet this Thursdayat 3:30 in Lounge A of the ReynoldsClub at which time they plan to setup a permanent committee along linessimilar to the temporary committee.The meeting is open to all campusstudents.Magazine Asks Girls,Girls Tell MagazineBy BEATA MUELLERAccording to the Good Housekeep¬ing survey of college girl opinion, al¬most every woman on this campuswould feel obliged to feed her mansteak if she invited him to dinner.There was one exception who offeredfrog legs.Most girls here want their mothersto drink and smoke, wear sensibleshoes, and listen to their adolescentdissertations on “friends, dates, aca¬demic problems, careers, love, religion,ethics...”Flying Course toContinue DuringSummer QuarterIn co-operation with the Civil Aero¬nautics Administration the Universitywill continue during the summer itsCivilian Pilot’s Training course at theFord-Lansing airport. Ground schoolclasses are on the University Quad¬rangles. Flight-instruction in Univer¬sity-owned airplanes in both prelim¬inary and advanced courses will beconducted at the airport, near Lans¬ing, Ill.The preliminary course covers 72hours of ground school instruction and25 to 45 hours of flight instruction.'The secondary couj’se includes 126hours of ground school and 40 hoursof flight instruction. Both courses areopen to men. and women who passgovernment physical requirements.Mental GiantsMost of their mothers, in turn ex¬pected them to be mental giants, so¬cial successes, career women, andhomebodies. As one of the girls said,filling out all three, “No wonder I’mmaladjusted.”Most girls read Esquire, the comics,the war news. Life, and the New Yor¬ker. One or two, possibly as a con¬cession to the title of the question¬naire, claimed to read Good House¬keeping.One year after graduation, the ma¬jority expect to hold down a “goodjob,” and ten years after graduationthey intend to be married and raisingfrom one to twelve children. Theyhope for a minimum weekly income of$25 to $40, to begin with, and wouldprefer not to work after marriage.Commented Dick Philbrick, “$26 to$40, rot! My wife is going to supportme, and in the style to which I’maccustomed.”Canopied BedsPreferences in furnishings variedfrom Swedish Modern to 17th centuryItalian, with knick-knacks. One filler-outer expressed a yearning for a can¬opy over her bed, understandable ifshe is a dormitory resident. Another,answering “WTiat do you wish yourroom had that is missing?” answered“Bedfellow.”Favorite sports indicated varied—golf, swimming, tennis, bowling, bad¬minton, and hiking. Only one re¬bellious soul answered tersely, “scull¬ing, sex.”Page TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. TUESDAY, APRIL 22. 1941%£ DaiLu IfhAootiThe Traveling BazaarConsult in GroupsAt Conference onHillel, interchurchSponsor WeekendsFOUNDED IN 1902The Dailr Mmooh is the official student newspaper of the Uni>eersity of Chiaaeo, published mornings except Saturdsr, Sunday,and Monday during the Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters byThe Daily Maroon Company, 6831 University avenue. Telephones;Hyde Park 9222.After 6:80 phone in stories to our printers. The Chief PrintingCompany, 148 West 62nd street. Telephones: Wentworth 6123and 6124.The University of Chicago aseumea no responsibility for anystatements appearing in The Daily Maroon, or for any contractentered into by The Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves the rights of publication ofany material appearing in this paper. Subscription rates: $3 a year;$4 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Fmtered as second class matter March 18, 1908, at the post officeat Chicago. Illinois, under the act of March 3. 1879.Member.Associated Collegiate PressDistributor ofCollegiate DigestBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialWILLIAM HANKLA PEARL C. RUBINSERNEST S. LEISER JOHN P. STEVENS. ChairmanBUSINESSROBERT P. O’DONNELL, Bus. Mgr.ROBERT HIGHMAN, Adv. Mgr.EDITORIAL ASSOCIATESJames Burtle, Mark Fisher, Richard Himmel, Robert Lawson,Daniel Mezlay, Richard Philbrick, Robert D. F. Reynolds, andDaniel Winograd.BUSINESS ASSOCIATESCHESTER ' SMITH. CirculationELLEN TUTTLE. Office Mgr.Richard Bolks. Wm. Van Horn, Myles Jarrow, Robert Pregler,Edward L. RachlinNight Editor: Dan MezlayFrom Beneath the StoneThere have been times recently when webegan to lose faith in the virility of the A.S.U.intellect. What had once been a fairly decentside show full of sky rockets, star bombs, andverbal pyrotechnics, always good for a smallriot or protest meeting of some sort, dwindledto nothing more than a name in the activitiesfiles of the Dean’s office as far as the generalcampus was concerned. Now our attention isdrawn to an article in the A.S.U. organ, “TheStudent Advocate,” in which President Hutch¬ins falls under the label of the anti-liberal.The group that for years had stopped criti¬cisms of their activities by saying that thosewho criticised them were name callers and redbaiters, see fit to reverse the pattern and pumpthe air full of mud with their own brand ofbaiting. Hutchins is anti-liberal because of thefollowing reasons:The Board of Trustees of the Universityconsists of capitalists, who hold important posi¬tions in the city’s biggest industries; one-fifthof the University’s money (26 millions) is in¬vested in real estate; he discriminates againstnon-union workers in the Building and GroundsDepartment; and his educational policies arefascistic.Considered in the order listed above, it pos¬sibly is the strangest feature of the Americaneducational system that people who have moneyto lend and give, or know how to invest it prof¬itably, are usually those who hold trustee posi¬tions. It may not be moral, but the simple factthat the type of man who can produce the de¬sired bank balance is a good man to finance adependent institution such as this and all pri¬vate universities are.Economics To Be ConsideredWe suppose that because one fifth of theUniversity’s money is in real estate, a good re¬investment proposition, all the land should begiven back to the Indians. The A.S.U. brings upthe point of discriminating against the largenegro population in respect to maintaininghigh rents in the University area. To place theblame of the situation on Hutchins’ desk is atbest unfair. They fail to consider the elemen¬tary economics involved; lower your rents andcorrespondingly lower the value of your land.Also, they lose the means to give scholarships,fellowships, hire excellent professors, and pur¬chase new equipment. The City of Chicago ownsthe title of responsibility to this problem.The next accusation comes under the head ofname calling. Hutchins not only is anti-liberalbut a fascist. He teaches the classics at hisschool. That is, they say, not progress. There¬fore, since you don’t progress, you are a fascist.There are all sorts of sieves, but leave it toA.S.U. thinking to be the sieviest.R.F.-D.R.Bj DICK HIMMELDon't Tell Shirlee Smith. . . but 4-way was a good party. Everybody had agood time except the Mortar Board pledges who couldn’ttalk to anyone but their dates. Not that they did... FrankEtherton was the hit of the evening. He came as aBlackfriars’ stunt with some lad helping out the causeby escorting him. La Etherton showed up in blue loung¬ing pajamas with a blue turban and gold earrings andnecklace. His toe nails and fingernails were painted adelicate pink. Etherton showed up with his date anddanced a few dances, and then Salzmann introduced himfrom the bandstand, and he sang a few numbers. Thenhe went back and finished dancing. I was that surprised. . . Art Bethke was there with Clarissa Rahill who hasturned into a pantherish looking woman these days. Onher it looks good . . . There was a giant Conga in acircle with Sue Bohnen and Bill Hochman doing a spe¬cialty in the center. It looked just like a picture byDarryl F. Zanuck. Bohnen and Hochman sure made agood dance team . . . Actually the crowd was not mixy.They all stayed at their own table. There was a rumoraround that a Quad talked to a Mortar Board, but Idon’t believe a word of it . . . Henrietta Mahon withBro Crane and don’t think it doesn’t make us happy. . . Mary Hammel’s dream man for the evening wasBob Hull . . . Janet Peacock with George Krakowka anddon’t think we weren’t surprised . . . Sister Margaretwith Paul Smith . . . Louise Howson and Jack Bern¬hardt. The next night he was out with Mike Rathje .. .Beth Mahan with P. Florian, which was back to normalfor a minute . . . (Georgia Hinchcliff with Johnny Keller.She also showed up at the Sigma cocktail party . . . AnnSteel and Dum Dum Wilson . . . Joan Sill and Bob C.Miller ... Ray Oakley and Jean Roff, I said Ray, didn’t I. . . Ginny Nichols and Bud Aronson rhumbaing andcongaing like mading . . . The Lounsburys . . . MaryluPrice looking just about the niftiest of anyone there...Dave Martin and B. van Liew .Woodward-Ma thews. . . Jean Woodward and Bob Mathews are engaged,which wasn’t much of a surprise, but they let the Trib¬une know before the Maroon and were we ever mad.Skull and Crescent. . . had their annual tea dance Sunday for the old andnew members. Reports are that there was a choicetable d’hote which consisted of a few slices of applein various stages of deterioration, a delicate littlefrench pastry and a cup of coffee. Well, fel¬las, if you’re good enough to get into S & Cyou don’t need to eat so good . . . Prexy Ed Nelsonwas with B. J. Nelson . . . Billy Baugher was with AnnSteel . . . John Cook and his lass from Oak Park. AskFlorian about Oak Park ... Ed Armstrong and JeanRob?????Jack Berger and Fay Trolander . . . “Scoop”Leman and Beezy Rosenheim . . . Bob Bean with MikeRathje . . . Marty Hanson and Carol Russell . . . JackRagle with the measles .The Ellis Co-op. . . which we like because it houses Jim Burtle, madethemselves distinctive over the week-end by running aFreudian Frolics party . . . Many things were accom¬plished. The 0PM (office of production management) ina skit decided to raise the birthrate by abolishing bat¬teries in policemen’s flashlights . . . Allen Garlinkle waslooking dreamily over Sonja Samuels, my stooge re¬ports. Hot damn! . . . Harold Stral was not holdingback his complexes just because his date Sara Rich¬mond was around ... Well, Freud was just rampant, kid.Let me tell you.YPSL ProtestsA BULL SESSIONby a speaker for the Socialist BlocA headlined article in Wednesday’s Maroon told ofthe withdrawal of the Socialist bloc from the “planningconference for the peace strike.” Aside from some fac¬tual confusion as the the identity of the group that with¬drew, the article contained a fair presentation of ourreasons for withdrawal. But neither the events thattranspired at the conference nor our position and rea¬sons for withdrawal can be adequately presented in oneparagraph.First we wish to state that we did not represent theStudent Socialist Club (L. S. I,). We were a workingbloc of members of the Young People’s Socialist League(Youth Section of the Workers Party) and membersof the Socialist Workers Party. We came to the confer¬ence to point out the necessity of issuing a clear cutcall and program for the strike, and to conclude anagreement for a united demonstration against the im¬perialist war into which this country is about to beplunged.But we weren’t at any time allowed to present fullyand explain our position! For as soon as the chairmansaw that there was a program to be presented in op¬position to the “official” one he limited speeches to 2minutes each. And this, despite the fact that there hadalready been two speeches of five minutes and ten min¬utes respectively in support of the program drawn upby the program committee. But more than that, thechairman arbitrarily limited the number of speakers, sothat we had only two speeches in which to present ourpoint of view—a grand total of four minutes in which toexplain our position.We expected something as undemocratic as this to(Gontinued on page three)Reading in JuneA new type program, enabling reg¬istrants to consult visiting authoritiesin small-group conferences, will fea¬ture the gathering of more than twothousand teachers at the Fourth An¬nual Conference on Reading at theUniversity of Chicago, June 25 to 28,Director William S. Gray announcedtoday.Under the auspices of the depart¬ment of education of the Universitythe Conference will have as its theme“Adjusting the Reading Program toIndividuals”. Thirty visiting educatorswill join with members of the Univer¬sity faculty in leading 55 sessions anddiscussion groups during the four-daymeeting.The conference is part of the fif¬tieth anniversary summer quarterschedule of the University which fath¬ered the summer quarter system.A highlight of the Reading Confer¬ence will be an address by Charles W.Ferguson, associate editor of theReader’s Digest, on “The Reader andCurrent Literature” on Thursday,June 26.The conference, the largest of itskind in the country, was founded atthe University four years ago by Dr.Gray, professor and executive secre¬tary of the University’s Committeeon the Preparation of Teachers.To plan programs for next yearboth the Hillel Foundation and Inter¬church Council will hold outings nextweekend. Hillel is sponsoring a week¬end at Camp Farr, Chesterton, In¬diana, while Interchurch ig to holdtheir day in the country at the GirlReserve Camp, Lemont, Illinois.Discussion the Club’s purposes anda recreational program are alsoscheduled for the Hillel weekend. TheInterchurch group will leave Satur¬day morning at 9 from the chapel andreturn the same day.Yellow BantamRental Library1460 E. 57Ui SL (Shop In Lobby)Open to 9 P. M.New Mysterlee, Novels, etc.For—CHICKENand RIBSMEET AT THEPiccanninnyBarbecue1411 E. 53rcl St.We DeliverHyde Perk 5300COLLEGE WOMENWANTED!CoLLsos women, with goodeducaUonal backgrounds plusprofessional secretarial andbusineaa training, are In de¬mand for Important posiUonsInvestigate now The CareerInstitute’s modem methodsthat lead to interesting bmi-Doas and professional careers.UOSTtATK>N OATESStncMXB QcAarxa . . . Jvhm 30Fall QnAarxa Sef>T 29Write /or Free Booklet"Careers"INSTITUTEAvwmm, D*»t. SS. CMcae*AFTER COLLEGE-WHAT?Does a Lifetime Job Appeal to You?FirstFifthOccupationLife Under-YaarYaarwriters ..._.1220015003Real Estata„ 17792749Enqinaars„ 15432928Taachars12132244Bankars-. 9503425Rata liars -... II2S3550Lawyars... 5402478Accountants._ 14293809Chamists.. 14503075THE greatest good fortune that could cometo any man !s to find a business connection inwhich ha can build and prospar, realizingevery desire, developing every ability ... weoffer such an opportunity to man of soundcharacter and good education. Those whoqualify will be given a complete course inUfa Insurance selling. LET'S TALK IT OVER. . . TELEPHONE FOR AN APPOINTMENTThe Mutual Life Insurance Companyof New York"First In Amerlce"SAMUEL HEIFETZ. Mgr. 141 W. Jackson Blvd.Telephone—Harrison 2970"P April 25, 26, Nay 2, 3 ^ pL R IAACIE RFTickets May Still Be Purchased satMANDEL CORRIDOR 1'fiimiPage TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. TUESDAY, APRIL 22. 1941%£ DaiLu IfhAootiThe Traveling BazaarConsult in GroupsAt Conference onHillel, interchurchSponsor WeekendsFOUNDED IN 1902The Dailr Mmooh is the official student newspaper of the Uni>eersity of Chiaaeo, published mornings except Saturdsr, Sunday,and Monday during the Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters byThe Daily Maroon Company, 6831 University avenue. Telephones;Hyde Park 9222.After 6:80 phone in stories to our printers. The Chief PrintingCompany, 148 West 62nd street. Telephones: Wentworth 6123and 6124.The University of Chicago aseumea no responsibility for anystatements appearing in The Daily Maroon, or for any contractentered into by The Daily Maroon.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves the rights of publication ofany material appearing in this paper. Subscription rates: $3 a year;$4 by mail. Single copies: three cents.Fmtered as second class matter March 18, 1908, at the post officeat Chicago. Illinois, under the act of March 3. 1879.Member.Associated Collegiate PressDistributor ofCollegiate DigestBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialWILLIAM HANKLA PEARL C. RUBINSERNEST S. LEISER JOHN P. STEVENS. ChairmanBUSINESSROBERT P. O’DONNELL, Bus. Mgr.ROBERT HIGHMAN, Adv. Mgr.EDITORIAL ASSOCIATESJames Burtle, Mark Fisher, Richard Himmel, Robert Lawson,Daniel Mezlay, Richard Philbrick, Robert D. F. Reynolds, andDaniel Winograd.BUSINESS ASSOCIATESCHESTER ' SMITH. CirculationELLEN TUTTLE. Office Mgr.Richard Bolks. Wm. Van Horn, Myles Jarrow, Robert Pregler,Edward L. RachlinNight Editor: Dan MezlayFrom Beneath the StoneThere have been times recently when webegan to lose faith in the virility of the A.S.U.intellect. What had once been a fairly decentside show full of sky rockets, star bombs, andverbal pyrotechnics, always good for a smallriot or protest meeting of some sort, dwindledto nothing more than a name in the activitiesfiles of the Dean’s office as far as the generalcampus was concerned. Now our attention isdrawn to an article in the A.S.U. organ, “TheStudent Advocate,” in which President Hutch¬ins falls under the label of the anti-liberal.The group that for years had stopped criti¬cisms of their activities by saying that thosewho criticised them were name callers and redbaiters, see fit to reverse the pattern and pumpthe air full of mud with their own brand ofbaiting. Hutchins is anti-liberal because of thefollowing reasons:The Board of Trustees of the Universityconsists of capitalists, who hold important posi¬tions in the city’s biggest industries; one-fifthof the University’s money (26 millions) is in¬vested in real estate; he discriminates againstnon-union workers in the Building and GroundsDepartment; and his educational policies arefascistic.Considered in the order listed above, it pos¬sibly is the strangest feature of the Americaneducational system that people who have moneyto lend and give, or know how to invest it prof¬itably, are usually those who hold trustee posi¬tions. It may not be moral, but the simple factthat the type of man who can produce the de¬sired bank balance is a good man to finance adependent institution such as this and all pri¬vate universities are.Economics To Be ConsideredWe suppose that because one fifth of theUniversity’s money is in real estate, a good re¬investment proposition, all the land should begiven back to the Indians. The A.S.U. brings upthe point of discriminating against the largenegro population in respect to maintaininghigh rents in the University area. To place theblame of the situation on Hutchins’ desk is atbest unfair. They fail to consider the elemen¬tary economics involved; lower your rents andcorrespondingly lower the value of your land.Also, they lose the means to give scholarships,fellowships, hire excellent professors, and pur¬chase new equipment. The City of Chicago ownsthe title of responsibility to this problem.The next accusation comes under the head ofname calling. Hutchins not only is anti-liberalbut a fascist. He teaches the classics at hisschool. That is, they say, not progress. There¬fore, since you don’t progress, you are a fascist.There are all sorts of sieves, but leave it toA.S.U. thinking to be the sieviest.R.F.-D.R.Bj DICK HIMMELDon't Tell Shirlee Smith. . . but 4-way was a good party. Everybody had agood time except the Mortar Board pledges who couldn’ttalk to anyone but their dates. Not that they did... FrankEtherton was the hit of the evening. He came as aBlackfriars’ stunt with some lad helping out the causeby escorting him. La Etherton showed up in blue loung¬ing pajamas with a blue turban and gold earrings andnecklace. His toe nails and fingernails were painted adelicate pink. Etherton showed up with his date anddanced a few dances, and then Salzmann introduced himfrom the bandstand, and he sang a few numbers. Thenhe went back and finished dancing. I was that surprised. . . Art Bethke was there with Clarissa Rahill who hasturned into a pantherish looking woman these days. Onher it looks good . . . There was a giant Conga in acircle with Sue Bohnen and Bill Hochman doing a spe¬cialty in the center. It looked just like a picture byDarryl F. Zanuck. Bohnen and Hochman sure made agood dance team . . . Actually the crowd was not mixy.They all stayed at their own table. There was a rumoraround that a Quad talked to a Mortar Board, but Idon’t believe a word of it . . . Henrietta Mahon withBro Crane and don’t think it doesn’t make us happy. . . Mary Hammel’s dream man for the evening wasBob Hull . . . Janet Peacock with George Krakowka anddon’t think we weren’t surprised . . . Sister Margaretwith Paul Smith . . . Louise Howson and Jack Bern¬hardt. The next night he was out with Mike Rathje .. .Beth Mahan with P. Florian, which was back to normalfor a minute . . . (Georgia Hinchcliff with Johnny Keller.She also showed up at the Sigma cocktail party . . . AnnSteel and Dum Dum Wilson . . . Joan Sill and Bob C.Miller ... Ray Oakley and Jean Roff, I said Ray, didn’t I. . . Ginny Nichols and Bud Aronson rhumbaing andcongaing like mading . . . The Lounsburys . . . MaryluPrice looking just about the niftiest of anyone there...Dave Martin and B. van Liew .Woodward-Ma thews. . . Jean Woodward and Bob Mathews are engaged,which wasn’t much of a surprise, but they let the Trib¬une know before the Maroon and were we ever mad.Skull and Crescent. . . had their annual tea dance Sunday for the old andnew members. Reports are that there was a choicetable d’hote which consisted of a few slices of applein various stages of deterioration, a delicate littlefrench pastry and a cup of coffee. Well, fel¬las, if you’re good enough to get into S & Cyou don’t need to eat so good . . . Prexy Ed Nelsonwas with B. J. Nelson . . . Billy Baugher was with AnnSteel . . . John Cook and his lass from Oak Park. AskFlorian about Oak Park ... Ed Armstrong and JeanRob?????Jack Berger and Fay Trolander . . . “Scoop”Leman and Beezy Rosenheim . . . Bob Bean with MikeRathje . . . Marty Hanson and Carol Russell . . . JackRagle with the measles .The Ellis Co-op. . . which we like because it houses Jim Burtle, madethemselves distinctive over the week-end by running aFreudian Frolics party . . . Many things were accom¬plished. The 0PM (office of production management) ina skit decided to raise the birthrate by abolishing bat¬teries in policemen’s flashlights . . . Allen Garlinkle waslooking dreamily over Sonja Samuels, my stooge re¬ports. Hot damn! . . . Harold Stral was not holdingback his complexes just because his date Sara Rich¬mond was around ... Well, Freud was just rampant, kid.Let me tell you.YPSL ProtestsA BULL SESSIONby a speaker for the Socialist BlocA headlined article in Wednesday’s Maroon told ofthe withdrawal of the Socialist bloc from the “planningconference for the peace strike.” Aside from some fac¬tual confusion as the the identity of the group that with¬drew, the article contained a fair presentation of ourreasons for withdrawal. But neither the events thattranspired at the conference nor our position and rea¬sons for withdrawal can be adequately presented in oneparagraph.First we wish to state that we did not represent theStudent Socialist Club (L. S. I,). We were a workingbloc of members of the Young People’s Socialist League(Youth Section of the Workers Party) and membersof the Socialist Workers Party. We came to the confer¬ence to point out the necessity of issuing a clear cutcall and program for the strike, and to conclude anagreement for a united demonstration against the im¬perialist war into which this country is about to beplunged.But we weren’t at any time allowed to present fullyand explain our position! For as soon as the chairmansaw that there was a program to be presented in op¬position to the “official” one he limited speeches to 2minutes each. And this, despite the fact that there hadalready been two speeches of five minutes and ten min¬utes respectively in support of the program drawn upby the program committee. But more than that, thechairman arbitrarily limited the number of speakers, sothat we had only two speeches in which to present ourpoint of view—a grand total of four minutes in which toexplain our position.We expected something as undemocratic as this to(Gontinued on page three)Reading in JuneA new type program, enabling reg¬istrants to consult visiting authoritiesin small-group conferences, will fea¬ture the gathering of more than twothousand teachers at the Fourth An¬nual Conference on Reading at theUniversity of Chicago, June 25 to 28,Director William S. Gray announcedtoday.Under the auspices of the depart¬ment of education of the Universitythe Conference will have as its theme“Adjusting the Reading Program toIndividuals”. Thirty visiting educatorswill join with members of the Univer¬sity faculty in leading 55 sessions anddiscussion groups during the four-daymeeting.The conference is part of the fif¬tieth anniversary summer quarterschedule of the University which fath¬ered the summer quarter system.A highlight of the Reading Confer¬ence will be an address by Charles W.Ferguson, associate editor of theReader’s Digest, on “The Reader andCurrent Literature” on Thursday,June 26.The conference, the largest of itskind in the country, was founded atthe University four years ago by Dr.Gray, professor and executive secre¬tary of the University’s Committeeon the Preparation of Teachers.To plan programs for next yearboth the Hillel Foundation and Inter¬church Council will hold outings nextweekend. Hillel is sponsoring a week¬end at Camp Farr, Chesterton, In¬diana, while Interchurch ig to holdtheir day in the country at the GirlReserve Camp, Lemont, Illinois.Discussion the Club’s purposes anda recreational program are alsoscheduled for the Hillel weekend. TheInterchurch group will leave Satur¬day morning at 9 from the chapel andreturn the same day.Yellow BantamRental Library1460 E. 57Ui SL (Shop In Lobby)Open to 9 P. M.New Mysterlee, Novels, etc.For—CHICKENand RIBSMEET AT THEPiccanninnyBarbecue1411 E. 53rcl St.We DeliverHyde Perk 5300COLLEGE WOMENWANTED!CoLLsos women, with goodeducaUonal backgrounds plusprofessional secretarial andbusineaa training, are In de¬mand for Important posiUonsInvestigate now The CareerInstitute’s modem methodsthat lead to interesting bmi-Doas and professional careers.UOSTtATK>N OATESStncMXB QcAarxa . . . Jvhm 30Fall QnAarxa Sef>T 29Write /or Free Booklet"Careers"INSTITUTEAvwmm, D*»t. SS. CMcae*AFTER COLLEGE-WHAT?Does a Lifetime Job Appeal to You?FirstFifthOccupationLife Under-YaarYaarwriters ..._.1220015003Real Estata„ 17792749Enqinaars„ 15432928Taachars12132244Bankars-. 9503425Rata liars -... II2S3550Lawyars... 5402478Accountants._ 14293809Chamists.. 14503075THE greatest good fortune that could cometo any man !s to find a business connection inwhich ha can build and prospar, realizingevery desire, developing every ability ... weoffer such an opportunity to man of soundcharacter and good education. Those whoqualify will be given a complete course inUfa Insurance selling. LET'S TALK IT OVER. . . TELEPHONE FOR AN APPOINTMENTThe Mutual Life Insurance Companyof New York"First In Amerlce"SAMUEL HEIFETZ. Mgr. 141 W. Jackson Blvd.Telephone—Harrison 2970"P April 25, 26, Nay 2, 3 ^ pL R IAACIE RFTickets May Still Be Purchased satMANDEL CORRIDOR 1'fiimiTHE DAILY MAROON. TUESDAY. APRIL 22. 1941Three Campus PeaceGroups Hold MeetingsGreeks*Role UpHigh Scores inSoftball MatchesThe Pi Lambs used 29 hits and nineof their opponents’ errors as theyfashioned a 34-2 defeat over the PhiKappa Siffs yesterday afternoon inIntramural softball. They were lead¬ing 21-2 going into the 6th inning, butadded 13 runs in that frame.The DU’s poured 16 runs over theplate in their sixth inning, and beatthe Phi Kappa Psi “B” team 29-7.The Deke A’s triumphed over theKappa Sig B’s, beating them by tenruns, and the Deke B’s took a 24-6lacing at the hands of the Psi U’s.On Friday, the Sigma Chi’s had abig fourth frame, making 17 tallies,to win over the Delta U B’s, 31-10.IM SoftballPsi U “A”, 24—Deke “B”, 6Deke “A”, 20—Kappa Sig “B”, 10Pi Lambda, 34—Phi Sig, 2Delta U, 29—Phi Psi “B”, 7Friday ResultsPhi Psi “B”, 20—Chi Psi, 16Phi Delts, 31—Kappa Sig “B”, 4Sigma Chi, 31—Delta U “B”, 10STUDENT SPECIALSMonday thru Thursday9 to 6LEMON CASTILLE SHAMPOOAND FINGER WAVE .AOcLATHERING OIL SHAMPOOAND FINGER WAVE .50cELLEN JANEBEAUTY SALON1155 E. 55th St.Mid. 0307Three different types of meetingswill be held tomorrow in observationof the campus desire for peace. Al¬though the meetings will all be heldon different platforms, they will notbe in opposition; neither will they bein cooperation except in their unitedaim for peace.The first of these meetings is thePeace Strike in the form of a parade,starting at 10:60, to be followed byfour speeches scheduled to be heardat Mandel Hall at 11:10. Representingthe views of labor, religious groups,the minority groups, and the academictheories on peace respectively, thefollowing speakers will be heard: BobTravis, the Reverend Armand Guer-rera, Ishmael Florry, and Albert How¬ard Carter. This peace strike is part ofa national Peace Strike traditionalsince 1935.At 4:00 o’clock in the afternoon inBond Chapel the Fellowship of Re¬conciliation is sponsoring threespeeches on “The Conscientious Ob¬jector’’. Kenneth Cuthbertson willpresent the political viewpoint, Don¬ovan E. Smucker, the religious, andSinclair Drake, the racial.In the evening, the Chicago Chris-tion Youth Council is sponsoring ameeting at the United Church ofHyde Park, 53rd and Blackstone at8. Speakers who are to be heard andtheir topics have been announced asfollows: Harold E. Fey, “America’sRole in the Far East”, Donovan E.Smucker, “Must Europe Starve?”,and Frank McCulloch “A Living De-moracy for America.”Further information about all themeetings, including the mobilizationpoints for the parade, are to be an¬nounced in tomorrow’s edition.YWCA AnnualLuncheon HasSpring MotifA11 women are invited to theY.W.C.A. traditional Spring LuncheonThursday from 11:30 to 1. Reserva¬tions for clubs, residence halls, andgroups of friends must be in byWednesday afternoon.Decorations will be flowers with aspring motif. The menu is spaghettiand Swedish meatballs, perfection sal¬ad, mint ice cream cake roll, andraisin bread, completely prepared andserved by the girls.Shirley Peterson heads the commit¬tee in charge, Donis Fisher and MaryElizabeth Davis are in charge of food,while Harriet Eaton is in charge ofdecorations; Phyllis Richards headsthe serving, and Jean Cargill, pub¬licity; Mary Bogie is responsible forcleanup, Margaret Stuart and Bar¬bara Gilfillan take care of ticket sales.Tickets are on sale for 35c at IdaNoyes, Cobb, and Mandel.All Student Publicity workersare asked to attend an importantmeeting to be held tomorrow. Wed-'nesday, April 23, at 3:30 in Lounge“A” of the Reynolds Club. Plansfor this Saturday’s Blackfriarsparty and for the coming SpringRound-up are to be discussed.Bull Session—(Continued from page two)occur, but nothing so concerted andvicious. For we knew, as everyoneknows, that the “Campus Peace Com¬mittee” is run and controlled by theStalinists. To be sure, there are anumber of sincere people in the or¬ganization, but these are used in thetime honored fashion, as ignorantfronts for the maneuvers of the Stalinboys behind the scene. And we knew,as everyone knows, that the Stalinistswould do everything within their pow¬er to keep us off the floor. You see,we are ‘Trotskyists.”Now for our program:I. Against participation in the Im¬perialist War.This war is not a war between “de¬mocracy” and a “new order.” It is astruggle between two groups of capi¬talist powers for the redivision of theworld’s colonies and markets. AndStalin tags along with the Axis inorder to grab the crumbs that fallfrom the table, and in order to pre¬vent invasion of his own poaching re¬serve.II. For the protection of labor’s dem¬ocratic rights. For academic free¬dom, against “Jim Crow” and An¬ti-Semitism.III. For aid to the Chinese workersand peasants in their struggleagainst imperialist aggression.IV. For the Oxford Oats.“We pledge not to support thisgovernment in any war it may under¬take.”V. For a Revolutionary War to wipefacism off the face of the earth.Only a war fought with revolution¬ary methods; a war fought with athoroughly democratic army; a warfought, not only to defeat the enemyat the front but also to demoralizeits army by calls to the populace totake things into their own hands;only a war of this sort can defeat thearmies of fascism and wipe thisscourge off the earth.This is the minimum program uponwhich we would have remained in theconference. The progfram adopted isworthless. It does not point to thefundamental issues, and it offers nosolution to the problem of defeatingfascism. At best, it is a program ting¬ed with pacifism, but pacifism cannotdefeat Fascism; nor can it build a So¬cialist world. With such a program wecannot be associated. For only by thedestruction of capitalism and thebuilding of Socialism can a peacefuland progressive world be built.Letters tothe EditorEditor, The Daily Marooa,University of Chicago,Dear Sir:Some celebrate the declaration ofvarious wars during this month, butmany students will set aside this year,as for eight years past, one day inApril as the day for public action forpeace. In the circumstances of thehour this means to declare non-co¬opera tfion with the effwls to involvethe United States in war, either nowor in the future.We favor peace emphasis, and thestronger the better. Fellowship ofReconciliation members endorsed thecampus call to a peace mass meetingat eleven o’clock April 23 in MandelHall. Individual F.O.R. members willfeel free to come to that meeting. Inaddition we want to call attention totwo other peace emphasis meetings sothat more people may be reached. Theeleven o’clock meeting will be ad¬dressed by speakers representingacademic, religious, labor and minori¬ties interests. At four o’clock the sub¬ject of Conscientious Objection will bepresented from three angles: reli¬gious pacifism, civil rights, and racialdiscrimination. The speakers will beDonovan Smucker, Mid-West secre¬tary of the F.O.R.; Kenneth Cuthbert¬son, Chicago Secretary of the KeepAmerica Out of War Congress; andSinclair Drake, Negro objector fromthe University. In the evening ateight o’clock, at the United Church ofHyde Park, 53rd and Blackstone, theChicago Youth Peace Council presentsHarold Fey, Field Editor of theChristian Century; Atty. Frank Mc¬Culloch, director of Mullenbach Insti¬tute; and Smucker.We feel that a different choice ofspeakers for the eleven o’clock meet¬ing would assure wider campus inter¬est and a broader interpretation of theplatform agreed upon. But the pointsof difference between religious paci¬fists and the Campus Peace Commit¬tee are not relevant to the immediateaims of the day o.; Peace Action. TheQuadrangles are large, both geograph¬ically and in scope of interests. Therewill be ample room, as there is direneed, for a wide variety of actions forpeace.Sincerely yours,Howard SchomerKarl E. ObonDonald W. BaldwinTENNIS RACKETS»145 to »17^i>Rackets of all leading manufacturers.Balls, Presses, and all accessories.Shorts, Sox, Shirts, Shoes, etc.COMPLETE RESTRINGING SERVICEWOODWORTH'S1311 E. 57th St. Open EveningsNear Kimbaric Ave. DORchester 4800Page ThreeCornwall—(Continued from page one)ins. Professors Gerard, Coulter, Bart-ky, Fay-Cooper Cole, Katz, and Boyn¬ton in an informal panel discussion.Included in other stags have been afilm on the Bali Bali Islands, and one.Captain Williams on “Military Ma¬neuvers.”This year the Basketball Danceshave been put on a really professionalbasis with such bands as the Bl{u:k-hawk’s Tony Cabot and the PumpRoom’s Charles Cox.This Wednesday night the Councilwill have as a guest speaker Mr.George Walter, noted handwriting ex¬pert. Mr. Walter will speak on “Hand¬writing in the Hauptmann Case.” Thisinteresting stagg will be in the SouthLounge at 7:30 and will be supple¬mented by films.Plan Twenty NewDefense CoursesTwenty new courses relating to thenational defense program, rangingfrom how to fly an airplane to studiesof wartime price policies, will be of¬fered in the summer quarter at theUniversity of Chicago, Carl F. Huth,director, announced today.In addition, the University’s newly-created Institute of Military Studies,the seventeenth annual institute ofthe Norman Waite Harris Foundation,this year devoted to Inter-Americanrelations, and doubled enrollment inthe Institute of Meteorology are sched¬uled.The summer session, divided intotwo terms, marks the fiftieth anni¬versary year of the institution whichfathered the summer quarter. Morethan 600 courses and twelve speciEilinstitutes and conferences under theguidance of 460 faculty members willbe offered. Registration for the firstterm opens June 21.Little Traveling BazaarThis little b is in this spot insteadof some other stuff because ye nighteditor has completely run out of copyand is very tired. One could mentionMargie the proofreader or Steve theforeman but they are not supposedto make good copy. One could men¬tion the Maroon cockroaches but thathas become clichaic. One could men¬tion Bob Geocaris for dating 6 womento the Ellis Co-op party last Saturdaynight. Oh hell, I’m going home.ClassifiedTO SELL—FIcwera, pipes and andhotel entertainment duebills at slashedprices to liquidate accumulated assets. SeeEllen Tuttle, Office Manaser, Dailr Ma¬roon business office—Lexinsrton Hall.BOOK CASES—SHELVES « TABLES—Cwtom-built. Bob Brown Carpenter Shop,6338 Lake Park Ave. Hyde Park 2894.DID YOU KNOW THAT THEFiftieth AnniversaryCAP andSPENDS $6.32 ON THE COPYYOU BOY FOR $4.85EDITIOH LIMITED TO SIX HUNDRED COPIESSUBSCRIBE NOW■■■■■■iimisiGOWNTHE DAILY MAROON. TUESDAY. APRIL 22. 1941Three Campus PeaceGroups Hold MeetingsGreeks*Role UpHigh Scores inSoftball MatchesThe Pi Lambs used 29 hits and nineof their opponents’ errors as theyfashioned a 34-2 defeat over the PhiKappa Siffs yesterday afternoon inIntramural softball. They were lead¬ing 21-2 going into the 6th inning, butadded 13 runs in that frame.The DU’s poured 16 runs over theplate in their sixth inning, and beatthe Phi Kappa Psi “B” team 29-7.The Deke A’s triumphed over theKappa Sig B’s, beating them by tenruns, and the Deke B’s took a 24-6lacing at the hands of the Psi U’s.On Friday, the Sigma Chi’s had abig fourth frame, making 17 tallies,to win over the Delta U B’s, 31-10.IM SoftballPsi U “A”, 24—Deke “B”, 6Deke “A”, 20—Kappa Sig “B”, 10Pi Lambda, 34—Phi Sig, 2Delta U, 29—Phi Psi “B”, 7Friday ResultsPhi Psi “B”, 20—Chi Psi, 16Phi Delts, 31—Kappa Sig “B”, 4Sigma Chi, 31—Delta U “B”, 10STUDENT SPECIALSMonday thru Thursday9 to 6LEMON CASTILLE SHAMPOOAND FINGER WAVE .AOcLATHERING OIL SHAMPOOAND FINGER WAVE .50cELLEN JANEBEAUTY SALON1155 E. 55th St.Mid. 0307Three different types of meetingswill be held tomorrow in observationof the campus desire for peace. Al¬though the meetings will all be heldon different platforms, they will notbe in opposition; neither will they bein cooperation except in their unitedaim for peace.The first of these meetings is thePeace Strike in the form of a parade,starting at 10:60, to be followed byfour speeches scheduled to be heardat Mandel Hall at 11:10. Representingthe views of labor, religious groups,the minority groups, and the academictheories on peace respectively, thefollowing speakers will be heard: BobTravis, the Reverend Armand Guer-rera, Ishmael Florry, and Albert How¬ard Carter. This peace strike is part ofa national Peace Strike traditionalsince 1935.At 4:00 o’clock in the afternoon inBond Chapel the Fellowship of Re¬conciliation is sponsoring threespeeches on “The Conscientious Ob¬jector’’. Kenneth Cuthbertson willpresent the political viewpoint, Don¬ovan E. Smucker, the religious, andSinclair Drake, the racial.In the evening, the Chicago Chris-tion Youth Council is sponsoring ameeting at the United Church ofHyde Park, 53rd and Blackstone at8. Speakers who are to be heard andtheir topics have been announced asfollows: Harold E. Fey, “America’sRole in the Far East”, Donovan E.Smucker, “Must Europe Starve?”,and Frank McCulloch “A Living De-moracy for America.”Further information about all themeetings, including the mobilizationpoints for the parade, are to be an¬nounced in tomorrow’s edition.YWCA AnnualLuncheon HasSpring MotifA11 women are invited to theY.W.C.A. traditional Spring LuncheonThursday from 11:30 to 1. Reserva¬tions for clubs, residence halls, andgroups of friends must be in byWednesday afternoon.Decorations will be flowers with aspring motif. The menu is spaghettiand Swedish meatballs, perfection sal¬ad, mint ice cream cake roll, andraisin bread, completely prepared andserved by the girls.Shirley Peterson heads the commit¬tee in charge, Donis Fisher and MaryElizabeth Davis are in charge of food,while Harriet Eaton is in charge ofdecorations; Phyllis Richards headsthe serving, and Jean Cargill, pub¬licity; Mary Bogie is responsible forcleanup, Margaret Stuart and Bar¬bara Gilfillan take care of ticket sales.Tickets are on sale for 35c at IdaNoyes, Cobb, and Mandel.All Student Publicity workersare asked to attend an importantmeeting to be held tomorrow. Wed-'nesday, April 23, at 3:30 in Lounge“A” of the Reynolds Club. Plansfor this Saturday’s Blackfriarsparty and for the coming SpringRound-up are to be discussed.Bull Session—(Continued from page two)occur, but nothing so concerted andvicious. For we knew, as everyoneknows, that the “Campus Peace Com¬mittee” is run and controlled by theStalinists. To be sure, there are anumber of sincere people in the or¬ganization, but these are used in thetime honored fashion, as ignorantfronts for the maneuvers of the Stalinboys behind the scene. And we knew,as everyone knows, that the Stalinistswould do everything within their pow¬er to keep us off the floor. You see,we are ‘Trotskyists.”Now for our program:I. Against participation in the Im¬perialist War.This war is not a war between “de¬mocracy” and a “new order.” It is astruggle between two groups of capi¬talist powers for the redivision of theworld’s colonies and markets. AndStalin tags along with the Axis inorder to grab the crumbs that fallfrom the table, and in order to pre¬vent invasion of his own poaching re¬serve.II. For the protection of labor’s dem¬ocratic rights. For academic free¬dom, against “Jim Crow” and An¬ti-Semitism.III. For aid to the Chinese workersand peasants in their struggleagainst imperialist aggression.IV. For the Oxford Oats.“We pledge not to support thisgovernment in any war it may under¬take.”V. For a Revolutionary War to wipefacism off the face of the earth.Only a war fought with revolution¬ary methods; a war fought with athoroughly democratic army; a warfought, not only to defeat the enemyat the front but also to demoralizeits army by calls to the populace totake things into their own hands;only a war of this sort can defeat thearmies of fascism and wipe thisscourge off the earth.This is the minimum program uponwhich we would have remained in theconference. The progfram adopted isworthless. It does not point to thefundamental issues, and it offers nosolution to the problem of defeatingfascism. At best, it is a program ting¬ed with pacifism, but pacifism cannotdefeat Fascism; nor can it build a So¬cialist world. With such a program wecannot be associated. For only by thedestruction of capitalism and thebuilding of Socialism can a peacefuland progressive world be built.Letters tothe EditorEditor, The Daily Marooa,University of Chicago,Dear Sir:Some celebrate the declaration ofvarious wars during this month, butmany students will set aside this year,as for eight years past, one day inApril as the day for public action forpeace. In the circumstances of thehour this means to declare non-co¬opera tfion with the effwls to involvethe United States in war, either nowor in the future.We favor peace emphasis, and thestronger the better. Fellowship ofReconciliation members endorsed thecampus call to a peace mass meetingat eleven o’clock April 23 in MandelHall. Individual F.O.R. members willfeel free to come to that meeting. Inaddition we want to call attention totwo other peace emphasis meetings sothat more people may be reached. Theeleven o’clock meeting will be ad¬dressed by speakers representingacademic, religious, labor and minori¬ties interests. At four o’clock the sub¬ject of Conscientious Objection will bepresented from three angles: reli¬gious pacifism, civil rights, and racialdiscrimination. The speakers will beDonovan Smucker, Mid-West secre¬tary of the F.O.R.; Kenneth Cuthbert¬son, Chicago Secretary of the KeepAmerica Out of War Congress; andSinclair Drake, Negro objector fromthe University. In the evening ateight o’clock, at the United Church ofHyde Park, 53rd and Blackstone, theChicago Youth Peace Council presentsHarold Fey, Field Editor of theChristian Century; Atty. Frank Mc¬Culloch, director of Mullenbach Insti¬tute; and Smucker.We feel that a different choice ofspeakers for the eleven o’clock meet¬ing would assure wider campus inter¬est and a broader interpretation of theplatform agreed upon. But the pointsof difference between religious paci¬fists and the Campus Peace Commit¬tee are not relevant to the immediateaims of the day o.; Peace Action. TheQuadrangles are large, both geograph¬ically and in scope of interests. Therewill be ample room, as there is direneed, for a wide variety of actions forpeace.Sincerely yours,Howard SchomerKarl E. ObonDonald W. BaldwinTENNIS RACKETS»145 to »17^i>Rackets of all leading manufacturers.Balls, Presses, and all accessories.Shorts, Sox, Shirts, Shoes, etc.COMPLETE RESTRINGING SERVICEWOODWORTH'S1311 E. 57th St. Open EveningsNear Kimbaric Ave. DORchester 4800Page ThreeCornwall—(Continued from page one)ins. Professors Gerard, Coulter, Bart-ky, Fay-Cooper Cole, Katz, and Boyn¬ton in an informal panel discussion.Included in other stags have been afilm on the Bali Bali Islands, and one.Captain Williams on “Military Ma¬neuvers.”This year the Basketball Danceshave been put on a really professionalbasis with such bands as the Bl{u:k-hawk’s Tony Cabot and the PumpRoom’s Charles Cox.This Wednesday night the Councilwill have as a guest speaker Mr.George Walter, noted handwriting ex¬pert. Mr. Walter will speak on “Hand¬writing in the Hauptmann Case.” Thisinteresting stagg will be in the SouthLounge at 7:30 and will be supple¬mented by films.Plan Twenty NewDefense CoursesTwenty new courses relating to thenational defense program, rangingfrom how to fly an airplane to studiesof wartime price policies, will be of¬fered in the summer quarter at theUniversity of Chicago, Carl F. Huth,director, announced today.In addition, the University’s newly-created Institute of Military Studies,the seventeenth annual institute ofthe Norman Waite Harris Foundation,this year devoted to Inter-Americanrelations, and doubled enrollment inthe Institute of Meteorology are sched¬uled.The summer session, divided intotwo terms, marks the fiftieth anni¬versary year of the institution whichfathered the summer quarter. Morethan 600 courses and twelve speciEilinstitutes and conferences under theguidance of 460 faculty members willbe offered. Registration for the firstterm opens June 21.Little Traveling BazaarThis little b is in this spot insteadof some other stuff because ye nighteditor has completely run out of copyand is very tired. One could mentionMargie the proofreader or Steve theforeman but they are not supposedto make good copy. One could men¬tion the Maroon cockroaches but thathas become clichaic. One could men¬tion Bob Geocaris for dating 6 womento the Ellis Co-op party last Saturdaynight. Oh hell, I’m going home.ClassifiedTO SELL—FIcwera, pipes and andhotel entertainment duebills at slashedprices to liquidate accumulated assets. SeeEllen Tuttle, Office Manaser, Dailr Ma¬roon business office—Lexinsrton Hall.BOOK CASES—SHELVES « TABLES—Cwtom-built. Bob Brown Carpenter Shop,6338 Lake Park Ave. Hyde Park 2894.DID YOU KNOW THAT THEFiftieth AnniversaryCAP andSPENDS $6.32 ON THE COPYYOU BOY FOR $4.85EDITIOH LIMITED TO SIX HUNDRED COPIESSUBSCRIBE NOW■■■■■■iimisiGOWNPaqe FourTHE DAILY MAROON. TUESDAY, APRIL 22. 1941NINE DROPS OPENER TO N.U., 4-0Ttco Teams Meet HereAgain This AfternoonNorthwestern’s co-champions won aheart-breaker from the Maroons Fri¬day. Northwestern only earned onerun, and Chicago threw away at leasttwo opportunities to score.The Purple made their earned runin the second inning when Hennerichsled olf with a double. Lopatka thenfanned Wendland and Madsen butArnold came through with a single,scoring Hennerichs.He Scores AgainHennerichs also scored the secondNorthwestern tally in the fourth in¬ning. He was safe on a wild throw byKen Jensen and was sacrified to sec¬ond by Wendland. Madsen then drovein the run with a single.The final two Purple scores wererung up in the eighth. Hennerichs,leading off again, was safe on an errorby Oostenbrug. Wendland was safe ona fielder’s choice when Hennerichswas forced at second. Madsen thencame through with another single,Wendland stopping at second. Arnoldwas safe on a fielder’s choice whenWendland was forced at third. WhileClason, the pitcher, was at bat, Arnoldstole second. Clason then singled andtwo runners crossed the plate. Samp¬son ended the inning by striking out.Run Doesn’t CountA Maroon runner actually crossedthe plate in the first inning but therun did not count. Earl Shanken ledoff with a single but was out tryingto steal. Hirschberg then walked.Manders singled and Hirschberg wentall the way around the bases whenthe Northwestern right fielder fum¬bled the ball. He was called out, how¬ever, for failing to touch second base.Basich ended the inning when he sentan easy grounder to Clason.In the fifth inning the Maroons hadthe bases loaded with one but couldnot score. Oostenbrug was walked tostart the inning. Paresi was safe ona fielder’s choice when Oostenbrugwas forced at second. Shanken thensingled, Paresi stopping at second.Hirschberg was safe on an error byMadsen and the bases were loaded.Manders then sent a long fly to leftfield and was out. Lopatka hit an easyroller to the pitcher and Paresi wasforced out at the plate.Success for ArtThe day was a success for only oneman—Art Lopatka. He held the twoPurple sluggers, McKinnon and De-Correvont, to one hit between them.Art, who went to high school withDeCorrevont, knew what to throwhim and struck him out twice. One ofthe strike-outs came in seventh inningwith men on second and third andtwo outs.The two teams will meet again thisafternoon at 3:30. Lopatka will prob¬ably have to play in center due to asore throat ailment which, althoughpresent Friday, is bothering him. BobMeyer should draw the starting as¬signment for the Maroons. Jack Fonsis still out with a sprained ankle andwill not be ready today.Box ScoreCHICAGONome A.B.E. Shanken, s.s 4HirschberK, 2b 2Manders, R.F 4Lopatka, P 4Basich, C 4Miller, L.F. 4Jensen, 3B 3Oostenbrug, IB 1Paresi, C.F 3NORTHWESTERNSampson, R.F 4Erdlitz, 2B 4McKinnon, S.S 4DeCorrevont, C.F 4Hennerichs. L.F 2Wendland. IB 3Madsen, 3B 4Arnold, C 4Clason, P 4R.000000000000020110Totals:Chicago 000 000 000Northwestern 010 100 020H.2010100010110102210 64 8Strike Outs: By Lopatka 9 ; by Clason 5E.10000121010000020053Walks: Off Lopatka 2; off Clason 4Earned runs: Northwestern 1; Chicago 0Erwin Madsen... 2 hits, 2 errorsAs I WasSaying-By BOB LAWSONThere is a sophomore at Illinoisnamed Fritz Jauch. Among his attri¬butes is sports writing to which heassiduously applies himself for theDaily Illini.Among his articles was a series“discussing possibilities and potential¬ities of Big Ten baseball teams thisspring.” When his series was finished,he published his predictions as to howthe Conference race would end up.This in itself is meritorious for it isseldom that one so young will ventureinto anything so uncertain as proph¬esying about Big Ten baseball. Heshowed a keen knowledge of press re¬leases in his estimate.My reason for bringing Mr. Jauchto the attention of a much larger au¬dience than he intended to write for isa simple little sentence he so callous¬ly inserted into his monograph.Insult to InjuryAfter disposing of nine teams inquick fashion he happened to remem¬ber that there was a team represent¬ing this University. He, following thelead of metropolitan sports writers,unceremoniously dumped the Maroonsin last place. Then, adding insult toinjury, he explained his stand thusly,“And does anyone ever pick anyone tofinish below Chicago?”In making such brash and tactlessstatements Mr. Jauch is merely in linewith the contempt that anyone con¬nected with Illinois athletics holds forChicago. To show such contempt instatements to or in the press leavesIllinois with a very unsavory odor inmy nostrils.It is unfortunate that one memberof the Western Conference should beso petty and small in its blow-offs con¬cerning another member. It is evenmore unfortunate when those blow-offs emanate from students in a news¬paper as well as from officials of theuniversity.Sophomoric StatementsIt is certainly Mr. Jauch’s preroga¬tive to stick himself far out on thelimb if he so desires. But when hedrags such juvenile and sophomoricstatements into his articles, he losesany respect I might have had for hismouthings.He concludes his sprightly bit ofcrystal-gazing by informing his no¬doubt numberless public that he in¬tends to disconnect his phone; changenames and addresses. I might alsosuggest that while in his enforcedhibernation he reflect a bit and com¬pare Illinois and Chicago, using asa basis the performance of amateurathletes only and also the number ofathletes which each school loses by in-1 eligibility after the season started.. Perhaps he won’t remember LouBoudreu or Hoot Evers and HenrySachs.Ohio State Takes Early LeadIn Conference Baseball RaceTrackers Bow ToWestern StateThe Maroon tracksters dropped adual meet to the Mud-loving Broncosof Western State Teacher’s College,63 to 68, in a driving rain at Kalama¬zoo, Michigan, Saturday.Standout man for the Chicago teamwas Jim Ray, who came through ashigh point man with three firts—highhurdles, high jump, and broad jump—and a second in the low hurdles.Other firsts went to Hugh Rendle-man, Ray Randal, and Warren Wilner,Randal taking two and Wilner put¬ting out exceptional performances intwo 220 yard runs and a 440.Captain Gerrit Stukkie, of theTeachers, performed outstandingly intaking the 100 yard dash with a timeof 10:01 regardless of the rain inwhich the meet was run off. Stukkiealso claimed a first in the 220 yarddash.> Second and third place points shov¬ed Western State’s score past the leadwon by the Maroon thinclad’s ninefirsts.S/ever Wins Two BoutsIn IM Fencing MeetRaymond Siever won the ThreeWeapon Championship last week inthe Intramural Fencing Meet held atBartlet Gym. He took both the Foilsand Saber events, winning five match¬es and losing none in the first, andrepeating his score in the second. JoeCzarnik took the Epee event, takingfive bouts and tying two.BIG TEN STANDINGSTeamW.L.G.B.Pet.1.Ohio State... 201.0002.Northwestern.. 10'41.0003.Indiana1.7604.Illinois.. 21‘ii.6676.Michigan... 001.0006.Iowa... 001.0007.CHICAGO.. 011%.0008.Wisconsin.. 01IVk.0009.Minnesota... 022.00010.Purdue... 022.000FRIDAY'S GAMESNorthwe»t«rn, 4- CHICAGO, 0Ohio Stat«, S—Purdue, 2 (11 inninga)Illinois, 6—Wisconsin, 0Indians, 5~ Minnesota. 1SATURDAY’S GAMESOhio, 4—Purdue, 2Indiana. 10—Minnesota. 9CHICAGO—Northwestern (rainlIllinois -Wisconsin (rain)Ohio State temporarily took the BigTen lead this week-end when it wontwo games from Purdue, consideredthe weakest team in the conference.Indiana SurpriseSurprising was Indiana’s doublevictory over Minnesota. Indiana fin¬ished seventh last season and wereexpected to do no better this yearwhile Minnesota was doped to have anoutside chance at the title. Indiana’ssuccess to date places it in a groupwith Michigan as the dark horses ofthe race. Michigan will not open itsseason until it meets Chicago Friday.The Chicago-Northwestern game,rained out Saturday, will be playedthis afternoon. The Illinois-Wisconsinwash out will probably not be re¬played.The schedule this week matches Chi¬cago with Michigan, Indiana withIowa, Purdue with Illinois, Minnesotawith Northwestern and Wisconsinwith Ohio State. All the series willconsist of two games.NEW LOCATIONTERESA DOLAN DANCING SCHOC1208 E. i3rd St.Near Woodlawn Av.BEGINNERS CLASSESMon. • Thurt. at 8:00 — SOcPrivate Lessons Any TimePhone Hyde Perk 30604 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSECOllEGE STUDENTS AND GRADUATESA thofxmgh, tMttnsiv*. sttnograpkic amru—slarttnjf January 1, April 1, Jttlv 1, October IInteresttHg Booklet sent free, without obligattom— write or phone. No solicitors employedmoserBUSINESS COLLEGEPAUL MOSER, J.D«PH.l.Remilor Courses for Bttinners, open to HighSchool Graduates only, start hrst Mondayof each month. Advanced Courses startany Mondm. Day and Evening. EveningCourses open to men.116 S. Michigon Av*., Chicago, hamdolph 4347Ifs ChesterfielclEverybody who smokes them likes theirCOOLER, MILDER, BETTER TASTEOn the movie lot or wherever you go, theRight Combination of the best tobaccosfrom our own Southland and from distantTurkey and Greece makes Chesterfield theone cigarette that truly Satisfies.Note how many more smokers are enjoyingChesterfield*s definitely Milder,Cooler^Smoking, Better Taste,PRISCILLA LANE,•tarring in Warner Bros.’forthcoming hit"MILLION DOLLAR BABY*CurvRiGiii 1941, Liccett i Meyers Tobacco Co.Paqe FourTHE DAILY MAROON. TUESDAY, APRIL 22. 1941NINE DROPS OPENER TO N.U., 4-0Ttco Teams Meet HereAgain This AfternoonNorthwestern’s co-champions won aheart-breaker from the Maroons Fri¬day. Northwestern only earned onerun, and Chicago threw away at leasttwo opportunities to score.The Purple made their earned runin the second inning when Hennerichsled olf with a double. Lopatka thenfanned Wendland and Madsen butArnold came through with a single,scoring Hennerichs.He Scores AgainHennerichs also scored the secondNorthwestern tally in the fourth in¬ning. He was safe on a wild throw byKen Jensen and was sacrified to sec¬ond by Wendland. Madsen then drovein the run with a single.The final two Purple scores wererung up in the eighth. Hennerichs,leading off again, was safe on an errorby Oostenbrug. Wendland was safe ona fielder’s choice when Hennerichswas forced at second. Madsen thencame through with another single,Wendland stopping at second. Arnoldwas safe on a fielder’s choice whenWendland was forced at third. WhileClason, the pitcher, was at bat, Arnoldstole second. Clason then singled andtwo runners crossed the plate. Samp¬son ended the inning by striking out.Run Doesn’t CountA Maroon runner actually crossedthe plate in the first inning but therun did not count. Earl Shanken ledoff with a single but was out tryingto steal. Hirschberg then walked.Manders singled and Hirschberg wentall the way around the bases whenthe Northwestern right fielder fum¬bled the ball. He was called out, how¬ever, for failing to touch second base.Basich ended the inning when he sentan easy grounder to Clason.In the fifth inning the Maroons hadthe bases loaded with one but couldnot score. Oostenbrug was walked tostart the inning. Paresi was safe ona fielder’s choice when Oostenbrugwas forced at second. Shanken thensingled, Paresi stopping at second.Hirschberg was safe on an error byMadsen and the bases were loaded.Manders then sent a long fly to leftfield and was out. Lopatka hit an easyroller to the pitcher and Paresi wasforced out at the plate.Success for ArtThe day was a success for only oneman—Art Lopatka. He held the twoPurple sluggers, McKinnon and De-Correvont, to one hit between them.Art, who went to high school withDeCorrevont, knew what to throwhim and struck him out twice. One ofthe strike-outs came in seventh inningwith men on second and third andtwo outs.The two teams will meet again thisafternoon at 3:30. Lopatka will prob¬ably have to play in center due to asore throat ailment which, althoughpresent Friday, is bothering him. BobMeyer should draw the starting as¬signment for the Maroons. Jack Fonsis still out with a sprained ankle andwill not be ready today.Box ScoreCHICAGONome A.B.E. Shanken, s.s 4HirschberK, 2b 2Manders, R.F 4Lopatka, P 4Basich, C 4Miller, L.F. 4Jensen, 3B 3Oostenbrug, IB 1Paresi, C.F 3NORTHWESTERNSampson, R.F 4Erdlitz, 2B 4McKinnon, S.S 4DeCorrevont, C.F 4Hennerichs. L.F 2Wendland. IB 3Madsen, 3B 4Arnold, C 4Clason, P 4R.000000000000020110Totals:Chicago 000 000 000Northwestern 010 100 020H.2010100010110102210 64 8Strike Outs: By Lopatka 9 ; by Clason 5E.10000121010000020053Walks: Off Lopatka 2; off Clason 4Earned runs: Northwestern 1; Chicago 0Erwin Madsen... 2 hits, 2 errorsAs I WasSaying-By BOB LAWSONThere is a sophomore at Illinoisnamed Fritz Jauch. Among his attri¬butes is sports writing to which heassiduously applies himself for theDaily Illini.Among his articles was a series“discussing possibilities and potential¬ities of Big Ten baseball teams thisspring.” When his series was finished,he published his predictions as to howthe Conference race would end up.This in itself is meritorious for it isseldom that one so young will ventureinto anything so uncertain as proph¬esying about Big Ten baseball. Heshowed a keen knowledge of press re¬leases in his estimate.My reason for bringing Mr. Jauchto the attention of a much larger au¬dience than he intended to write for isa simple little sentence he so callous¬ly inserted into his monograph.Insult to InjuryAfter disposing of nine teams inquick fashion he happened to remem¬ber that there was a team represent¬ing this University. He, following thelead of metropolitan sports writers,unceremoniously dumped the Maroonsin last place. Then, adding insult toinjury, he explained his stand thusly,“And does anyone ever pick anyone tofinish below Chicago?”In making such brash and tactlessstatements Mr. Jauch is merely in linewith the contempt that anyone con¬nected with Illinois athletics holds forChicago. To show such contempt instatements to or in the press leavesIllinois with a very unsavory odor inmy nostrils.It is unfortunate that one memberof the Western Conference should beso petty and small in its blow-offs con¬cerning another member. It is evenmore unfortunate when those blow-offs emanate from students in a news¬paper as well as from officials of theuniversity.Sophomoric StatementsIt is certainly Mr. Jauch’s preroga¬tive to stick himself far out on thelimb if he so desires. But when hedrags such juvenile and sophomoricstatements into his articles, he losesany respect I might have had for hismouthings.He concludes his sprightly bit ofcrystal-gazing by informing his no¬doubt numberless public that he in¬tends to disconnect his phone; changenames and addresses. I might alsosuggest that while in his enforcedhibernation he reflect a bit and com¬pare Illinois and Chicago, using asa basis the performance of amateurathletes only and also the number ofathletes which each school loses by in-1 eligibility after the season started.. Perhaps he won’t remember LouBoudreu or Hoot Evers and HenrySachs.Ohio State Takes Early LeadIn Conference Baseball RaceTrackers Bow ToWestern StateThe Maroon tracksters dropped adual meet to the Mud-loving Broncosof Western State Teacher’s College,63 to 68, in a driving rain at Kalama¬zoo, Michigan, Saturday.Standout man for the Chicago teamwas Jim Ray, who came through ashigh point man with three firts—highhurdles, high jump, and broad jump—and a second in the low hurdles.Other firsts went to Hugh Rendle-man, Ray Randal, and Warren Wilner,Randal taking two and Wilner put¬ting out exceptional performances intwo 220 yard runs and a 440.Captain Gerrit Stukkie, of theTeachers, performed outstandingly intaking the 100 yard dash with a timeof 10:01 regardless of the rain inwhich the meet was run off. Stukkiealso claimed a first in the 220 yarddash.> Second and third place points shov¬ed Western State’s score past the leadwon by the Maroon thinclad’s ninefirsts.S/ever Wins Two BoutsIn IM Fencing MeetRaymond Siever won the ThreeWeapon Championship last week inthe Intramural Fencing Meet held atBartlet Gym. He took both the Foilsand Saber events, winning five match¬es and losing none in the first, andrepeating his score in the second. JoeCzarnik took the Epee event, takingfive bouts and tying two.BIG TEN STANDINGSTeamW.L.G.B.Pet.1.Ohio State... 201.0002.Northwestern.. 10'41.0003.Indiana1.7604.Illinois.. 21‘ii.6676.Michigan... 001.0006.Iowa... 001.0007.CHICAGO.. 011%.0008.Wisconsin.. 01IVk.0009.Minnesota... 022.00010.Purdue... 022.000FRIDAY'S GAMESNorthwe»t«rn, 4- CHICAGO, 0Ohio Stat«, S—Purdue, 2 (11 inninga)Illinois, 6—Wisconsin, 0Indians, 5~ Minnesota. 1SATURDAY’S GAMESOhio, 4—Purdue, 2Indiana. 10—Minnesota. 9CHICAGO—Northwestern (rainlIllinois -Wisconsin (rain)Ohio State temporarily took the BigTen lead this week-end when it wontwo games from Purdue, consideredthe weakest team in the conference.Indiana SurpriseSurprising was Indiana’s doublevictory over Minnesota. Indiana fin¬ished seventh last season and wereexpected to do no better this yearwhile Minnesota was doped to have anoutside chance at the title. Indiana’ssuccess to date places it in a groupwith Michigan as the dark horses ofthe race. Michigan will not open itsseason until it meets Chicago Friday.The Chicago-Northwestern game,rained out Saturday, will be playedthis afternoon. The Illinois-Wisconsinwash out will probably not be re¬played.The schedule this week matches Chi¬cago with Michigan, Indiana withIowa, Purdue with Illinois, Minnesotawith Northwestern and Wisconsinwith Ohio State. All the series willconsist of two games.NEW LOCATIONTERESA DOLAN DANCING SCHOC1208 E. i3rd St.Near Woodlawn Av.BEGINNERS CLASSESMon. • Thurt. at 8:00 — SOcPrivate Lessons Any TimePhone Hyde Perk 30604 MONTH INTENSIVE COURSECOllEGE STUDENTS AND GRADUATESA thofxmgh, tMttnsiv*. sttnograpkic amru—slarttnjf January 1, April 1, Jttlv 1, October IInteresttHg Booklet sent free, without obligattom— write or phone. No solicitors employedmoserBUSINESS COLLEGEPAUL MOSER, J.D«PH.l.Remilor Courses for Bttinners, open to HighSchool Graduates only, start hrst Mondayof each month. Advanced Courses startany Mondm. Day and Evening. 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