Z-149THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1941Price Three CentsUniversityPuts OutOwnPaperPlioto by Sie\e Lewdlyn—the Mirror Can-Can chorua,front and back, as seen in the finale«f the first act of the 1892-1941 Mir¬ror. Can-Can chorines are Virginia AUling, Ruth Apprich, Agle Argiris,Iteverly Blansten, Barbara Deutsch,Sue Easton, Frances Farwell, Char¬lotte Ford, Jean Groenier, JackieMoral, Margaret Hibbard, Angela Pey-raod, Helen Quisenberry, MarilynRobb, Mary Trovillion, and Carol Rus¬sell.Hi * « >CPPER RIGHT—Ruth Wehlan singsher own composition, “Wolf Stay WayProm My Door” with Chuck Towey’sorchestra.COWER RIGHT—Hattie Paine Hahnwowing the audience with “Daphne isa Deb” and giving out more with an‘■ncore of “Glamour Girl”.Volume 1, number 1 of the Anniver¬sary Times, a newspaper dedicated topublicizing the University’s FiftiethAnniversary, will reach the homes ofover a thousand prominent Chicagoansthis morning.Containing eight pages and modeledafter the format of the Chicago DailyTimes, the paper gives news of theUniversity’s Citizen Board as well asreports on the progress of the anni¬versary fund raising campaign. Leadstory of the issue is the recent elec¬tion of George A. Ranney, chairman ofthe board of the Peoples Gas Lightand Coke Company, to the head of theCitizens Board. The board is a grouporganized by the University two yearsago to ci'ystalize the interest of civicand business leaders in the Univer¬sity; the group at the present hasabout 300 members.National DefenseIn addition to the election storythere are accounts of the meeting re¬cently had by the board to discuss thepart to be played by the University innational defense, and an article on aninspection trip to the Quadrangles tobe made by the members of the boardnext Saturday.Counterbalancing the emphasis onnational defense is a recent speechmade by President Hutchins in whichhe pleads that we prevent our educa¬tional system from becoming purelya preparation for w'ar. The editorial,telling the role of the University inwar and peace, and accompanyingcartoon were both used in Tuesday’sDaily Times and were composed bymembers of the staff of that paper.50th Anniversary MirrorProductionOpensT onightYoung AmericansSofter Than in1917"-MetcalfYoung men of America, particular¬ly those who are city bred, are softerthan they were in 1917, and not inshape to walk long distances or toperform the heavy physical labor ofarmy life, T. Nelson Metcalf, direc¬tor of athletics at the University ofChicago, declared in an interview yes¬terday.Because of the physical weaknessof newly-conscripted men, Metcalfsaid, there is need for special em¬phasis on college physical education,on heavy athletics, hiking, running,combat sports, and all types of gameswhich emphasize special qualities ofstrength, endurance, skill and leader¬ship, which are essential to army life.“The man who is in first class phys¬ical condition when he enters the armywill be of greater usefulness to hiscountry, will enjoy army life more,and will have a better prospect ofearly promotion than the man whobreaks into the strenuous grind whilesoft and out of condition,” Metcalfadded.Colleges can contribute to this pro¬gram of physical training in threeways, Metcalf said.1. Extend, improve, and intensifyhealth instruction for all students inthe college, men and women alike,without important changes in pro¬gram content.2. Provide all men who are pros-The page also contains a plea by Herb I pects for conscription with more in-Graffis syndicated columnist, for funds I tensive health instruction, first-aidfor the University. (Continued on page four)Dick HimmelThe President Speaks-'Youth Is No SofterThan In'!?'—HutchinsTo ERNEST LEISER“Of course, I am one of the softestcharacters on campus, but I see noevidence that the youth of today issofter than it was in 1916-1917,”quipped President Hutchins in his in¬terview with the Maroon yesterday.“I do not know how seriously peopletake basketball losses, but I feel thatif our succession of defeats does inter¬fere with the happiness of students, orthe welfare of the University, we canlighten our schedule and play teams ofour own calibre much more easily thanwe could in football,” he added.He did not think that it was neces¬sary to abolish intercollegiate basket¬ball. “Winning or losing basketball”does not mean as much to Americansas does a good or bad fodtball team,he feels.Turning again again to the physicalcondition of American youth, he point¬ed out that since the first World War,almost all colleges have developed ex¬tensive programs of “athletics for all.”“I’ll admit that from my vantage pointin an Ivory Tower, I have no exten¬sive evidence to prove my argument,”he modestly said, “and I haven’t gonearound feeling the muscles of theyounger generation, but I am not con¬vinced that we are less virile todaythan we were twenty years ago,” Hestressed that problems other than thephysical imperfections of the youthwere more serious, and more desei-vingof serious attention.The President argued with the writ¬er about the desirability of lending aidto insure a British victory at any cost.(Continued on page two)Good Songs, Novelty Chorus Routines,Fitting Costumes Fail to Raise Show to1940 Level.By ERNEST LEISERMirror 1941 hits Mandel Hall for its first student perform¬ance with good songs, clever chorus novelty routines, and costumesappropriate for the celebration of the 50th Anniversary.Lacking the hilarious tempo set last year by the Paine-Himmel-Atkinson-Welch union of comic talent, skits in this year’s showare for the most part mediocre, and Dean William Randall’s direc¬tion is rough, making for a spotty revue. In a few places, how¬ever, comedy rises to its last year’s top, and the songs and singersare almost good enough to make up for the show’s dramatic de¬ficiency.-- , Star without peer is omnipresentDick Himmel, who wrote most of theskits and acts in almost all of them.He struggles valiantly, singlehanded,and sometimes successfully to raisethe comic level of this year’s show,“Mortimer and Bob”Best of the skits is his “IIow toRead a Blond”, in which he stars withEddie Armstrong, as “Mortimer andBob”. The skit is an excellent TomHoward and George Sheldon act goneUniversity of Chicago.Next in comic value is “At theSwitch”, written ter. years ago byalumnus Norm Eaton. One-fifth of theChicago Theatrical Season skit, thepresentation of “Life With Father” isexcellent, but the rest is at best me¬diocre. Sue Bohnen does an amusingbit as a lecturer in an entertainingmonolugue. The monologue expandsinto a demonstration of “Miss Be¬havior on a Hayride” with Marty Han¬sen as La Bohnen’s object lesson.Paine Hits High PointSingers Paine, Betty Ann Evans,Ardis Molitor, and Ruth Wehlan areamazing, and the songs they sing arealmost as good. Hattie Paine, singing“Daphne is a Deb,” and reviving“Glamour Girl” for her encore, raisesfor a moment. Mirror 1941 to profes¬sional heights. Ruthie Wehlan is ex¬ceedingly pleasing when she sings herown song, “The Campus Wolf,” butlack of microphones causes failure toproject another good melody, the gaygay nineties “Toast of Old Broadway”so that the audience can hear it.(Continued on page four)Mirror's AtlasChapel UnionNominates OfficersFor Coming YearChapel Union will choose leadersfor the coming year, next week whenit holds its annual election on Wed¬nesday and Thursday. Nominationswill be made by a nominatin;^ com¬mittee composed of outgoing seniors,Janet Vanderwalker, Bob Boyer,Esther Durkee, and present presidentEvon “E.Z.” Vogt aided by membersof the staff, Howard Schomer, HappieVan der Water and Ruth Correll. Theslate will be announced at the regDance in ReynoldsClub After MirrorWhen the curtain goes down on thelast Mirror act tonight. Chuck Toweyand his orchestra will pick up itsI equipment and move to the Reynoldsular Sunday evening meeting when I Club lounges to furnish music for theadditional nominations from the floor! Basketball Dance of the Year,may be made by members. Dancing to his music will continueVoting will be held in the Chapel until 1. Tickets for the informal af-office from 9 to 5 next Wednesday and are on sale at the InformationThursday. All members of groups Office at 44 cents per individual bid.sponsored by Chapel Union as well as They may also ^ obtained frommembers of the Union itself will be members of the Reynolds Club coun-eligible to vote. cil.Z-149THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1941Price Three CentsUniversityPuts OutOwnPaperPlioto by Sie\e Lewdlyn—the Mirror Can-Can chorua,front and back, as seen in the finale«f the first act of the 1892-1941 Mir¬ror. Can-Can chorines are Virginia AUling, Ruth Apprich, Agle Argiris,Iteverly Blansten, Barbara Deutsch,Sue Easton, Frances Farwell, Char¬lotte Ford, Jean Groenier, JackieMoral, Margaret Hibbard, Angela Pey-raod, Helen Quisenberry, MarilynRobb, Mary Trovillion, and Carol Rus¬sell.Hi * « >CPPER RIGHT—Ruth Wehlan singsher own composition, “Wolf Stay WayProm My Door” with Chuck Towey’sorchestra.COWER RIGHT—Hattie Paine Hahnwowing the audience with “Daphne isa Deb” and giving out more with an‘■ncore of “Glamour Girl”.Volume 1, number 1 of the Anniver¬sary Times, a newspaper dedicated topublicizing the University’s FiftiethAnniversary, will reach the homes ofover a thousand prominent Chicagoansthis morning.Containing eight pages and modeledafter the format of the Chicago DailyTimes, the paper gives news of theUniversity’s Citizen Board as well asreports on the progress of the anni¬versary fund raising campaign. Leadstory of the issue is the recent elec¬tion of George A. Ranney, chairman ofthe board of the Peoples Gas Lightand Coke Company, to the head of theCitizens Board. The board is a grouporganized by the University two yearsago to ci'ystalize the interest of civicand business leaders in the Univer¬sity; the group at the present hasabout 300 members.National DefenseIn addition to the election storythere are accounts of the meeting re¬cently had by the board to discuss thepart to be played by the University innational defense, and an article on aninspection trip to the Quadrangles tobe made by the members of the boardnext Saturday.Counterbalancing the emphasis onnational defense is a recent speechmade by President Hutchins in whichhe pleads that we prevent our educa¬tional system from becoming purelya preparation for w'ar. The editorial,telling the role of the University inwar and peace, and accompanyingcartoon were both used in Tuesday’sDaily Times and were composed bymembers of the staff of that paper.50th Anniversary MirrorProductionOpensT onightYoung AmericansSofter Than in1917"-MetcalfYoung men of America, particular¬ly those who are city bred, are softerthan they were in 1917, and not inshape to walk long distances or toperform the heavy physical labor ofarmy life, T. Nelson Metcalf, direc¬tor of athletics at the University ofChicago, declared in an interview yes¬terday.Because of the physical weaknessof newly-conscripted men, Metcalfsaid, there is need for special em¬phasis on college physical education,on heavy athletics, hiking, running,combat sports, and all types of gameswhich emphasize special qualities ofstrength, endurance, skill and leader¬ship, which are essential to army life.“The man who is in first class phys¬ical condition when he enters the armywill be of greater usefulness to hiscountry, will enjoy army life more,and will have a better prospect ofearly promotion than the man whobreaks into the strenuous grind whilesoft and out of condition,” Metcalfadded.Colleges can contribute to this pro¬gram of physical training in threeways, Metcalf said.1. Extend, improve, and intensifyhealth instruction for all students inthe college, men and women alike,without important changes in pro¬gram content.2. Provide all men who are pros-The page also contains a plea by Herb I pects for conscription with more in-Graffis syndicated columnist, for funds I tensive health instruction, first-aidfor the University. (Continued on page four)Dick HimmelThe President Speaks-'Youth Is No SofterThan In'!?'—HutchinsTo ERNEST LEISER“Of course, I am one of the softestcharacters on campus, but I see noevidence that the youth of today issofter than it was in 1916-1917,”quipped President Hutchins in his in¬terview with the Maroon yesterday.“I do not know how seriously peopletake basketball losses, but I feel thatif our succession of defeats does inter¬fere with the happiness of students, orthe welfare of the University, we canlighten our schedule and play teams ofour own calibre much more easily thanwe could in football,” he added.He did not think that it was neces¬sary to abolish intercollegiate basket¬ball. “Winning or losing basketball”does not mean as much to Americansas does a good or bad fodtball team,he feels.Turning again again to the physicalcondition of American youth, he point¬ed out that since the first World War,almost all colleges have developed ex¬tensive programs of “athletics for all.”“I’ll admit that from my vantage pointin an Ivory Tower, I have no exten¬sive evidence to prove my argument,”he modestly said, “and I haven’t gonearound feeling the muscles of theyounger generation, but I am not con¬vinced that we are less virile todaythan we were twenty years ago,” Hestressed that problems other than thephysical imperfections of the youthwere more serious, and more desei-vingof serious attention.The President argued with the writ¬er about the desirability of lending aidto insure a British victory at any cost.(Continued on page two)Good Songs, Novelty Chorus Routines,Fitting Costumes Fail to Raise Show to1940 Level.By ERNEST LEISERMirror 1941 hits Mandel Hall for its first student perform¬ance with good songs, clever chorus novelty routines, and costumesappropriate for the celebration of the 50th Anniversary.Lacking the hilarious tempo set last year by the Paine-Himmel-Atkinson-Welch union of comic talent, skits in this year’s showare for the most part mediocre, and Dean William Randall’s direc¬tion is rough, making for a spotty revue. In a few places, how¬ever, comedy rises to its last year’s top, and the songs and singersare almost good enough to make up for the show’s dramatic de¬ficiency.-- , Star without peer is omnipresentDick Himmel, who wrote most of theskits and acts in almost all of them.He struggles valiantly, singlehanded,and sometimes successfully to raisethe comic level of this year’s show,“Mortimer and Bob”Best of the skits is his “IIow toRead a Blond”, in which he stars withEddie Armstrong, as “Mortimer andBob”. The skit is an excellent TomHoward and George Sheldon act goneUniversity of Chicago.Next in comic value is “At theSwitch”, written ter. years ago byalumnus Norm Eaton. One-fifth of theChicago Theatrical Season skit, thepresentation of “Life With Father” isexcellent, but the rest is at best me¬diocre. Sue Bohnen does an amusingbit as a lecturer in an entertainingmonolugue. The monologue expandsinto a demonstration of “Miss Be¬havior on a Hayride” with Marty Han¬sen as La Bohnen’s object lesson.Paine Hits High PointSingers Paine, Betty Ann Evans,Ardis Molitor, and Ruth Wehlan areamazing, and the songs they sing arealmost as good. Hattie Paine, singing“Daphne is a Deb,” and reviving“Glamour Girl” for her encore, raisesfor a moment. Mirror 1941 to profes¬sional heights. Ruthie Wehlan is ex¬ceedingly pleasing when she sings herown song, “The Campus Wolf,” butlack of microphones causes failure toproject another good melody, the gaygay nineties “Toast of Old Broadway”so that the audience can hear it.(Continued on page four)Mirror's AtlasChapel UnionNominates OfficersFor Coming YearChapel Union will choose leadersfor the coming year, next week whenit holds its annual election on Wed¬nesday and Thursday. Nominationswill be made by a nominatin;^ com¬mittee composed of outgoing seniors,Janet Vanderwalker, Bob Boyer,Esther Durkee, and present presidentEvon “E.Z.” Vogt aided by membersof the staff, Howard Schomer, HappieVan der Water and Ruth Correll. Theslate will be announced at the regDance in ReynoldsClub After MirrorWhen the curtain goes down on thelast Mirror act tonight. Chuck Toweyand his orchestra will pick up itsI equipment and move to the Reynoldsular Sunday evening meeting when I Club lounges to furnish music for theadditional nominations from the floor! Basketball Dance of the Year,may be made by members. Dancing to his music will continueVoting will be held in the Chapel until 1. Tickets for the informal af-office from 9 to 5 next Wednesday and are on sale at the InformationThursday. All members of groups Office at 44 cents per individual bid.sponsored by Chapel Union as well as They may also ^ obtained frommembers of the Union itself will be members of the Reynolds Club coun-eligible to vote. cil.Page TwoTHE DAILY MARCX)N. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1941%£ TnaADotiPOUNDED IN 1901Hyde P#rk 9221 and 9222. , nn,- pvii^f PHniina^ After 6:30 phone in storiea to our printers. The Chief Printing148 West 62nd street. Telephones: Wentworth 6123*”*The^\jniversity of Chicago assumes no responsibilitystatemenu appearing in The Daily Maroon, or for any contractUa^ty^Mar^nExpressly reserves the rightsany material appearing in this paper. Subscription rates: $3 a year.$4 by mail. Single copies: three cenU.Entered as second class matter March 18 1908 at the post officeSt Cfl**ago. Illinois, under the act of March 3. l»iv.Memberftssocided GDllG6icitG PressDistributor ofGollebiclie DibestBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialWlLl 1AM HANKLA PEARL C. RUBINS?RN#T S. LEISER JOHN P. STEVENS. ChairmanBusinessWILI.IAM LOVELL, Business ManagerWILLIAM KIMBALL. Advertising ManagerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATES . r^ : iJames Hurtle, Mark Fisher. Chester Hand, Richard Himmel. Dan elleslay, Richard Philbrick, Robert D. F. Reynolds, and DanielWinograd. BUSINESS ASSOCIATESRobert Dean, Lyle Harper, and Myles Jarrow.Night Editors: Willy Hankla and Charly DarraghSigns of the "Times"Apparently the University has gone “allout” for defense. .President Hutchins did not say this. On thecontrary, he has insisted, and with perfectjustification, that institutions of higher educa¬tion could serve defense needs much better byremaining institutions of higher education. Hehas pleaded that turning American universitiesinto armed camps or into laboratories whereskilled military technicians are trained, wouldbe fatal to true education. He has rightlystressed the far greater importance of moraland intellectual training to permanent defense.Tabloid BlurtsMr. Hutchins has not said that the Univer¬sity is “all out” for defense, but a publicationcalled the “Anniversary Times,” issued byFiftieth Anniversary workers with the ap¬proval of the administration, has—has blurtedit out in tabloid size headlines. Most of thepages of the “Times,” in fact, were devoted tothe University’s accomplishments in defense.Only a statement by the President and an edi¬torial stressed the long-run concerns of Chica¬go.The newspaper-bulletin was a skillfully pre¬sented, well-organized instrument of propagan¬da issued in the noble cause of the FiftiethAnniversary. It is too bad that it had to stressthe less important, less lasting aspects of theschool.False ImpressionLuckily, the University is not “all out” fordefense. The impression given that our scholarshave forsaken their important research in orderto feverishly search for the hidden weaponwhich will win the next war is a false one. But,because it is false, it is an unfortunate one.Those people who read the “AnniversaryTimes” will see a picture of Chicago which isnot a true one. The University'is strong enoughto live because of its own instrinsic merits. Itis too bad that overzealous publicity men haveundertaken to paint a false picture of its activ¬ities, a picture that may be harmful, and cer¬tainly undignified.There has been offered the excuse that thisis only one of a series of proposed bulletinsshowing various phases of the University’swork. This is only a partial excuse, since thefirst issue would have better shown the Univer¬sity’s most valuable contributions to America.We hope, however, that future issues of suchbulletins, if they come out, will display moreaccurately just what goes on at the University.E. S. L.Today on QuadranglesNoon Phonograph Concert, Social Science AssemblyHall, 12:30.Calvert Club, Illustrated Lecture, “Trappist Monksin the Modern World,” Daniel Connell, Ida NoyesTheater, 4:30,Mathematical Biophysics Seminar, “MathematicalBiophysics of Phycho-Galvanic Reflex,” C. H. Combs,6822 Drexel Avenue, 4:30,Social Science Administration Banquet, BurtonCourt, 7.Hillel Foundation Friday Fireside, “Sensibility inModem Literature: Mann, Kafka, and Joyce,” DavidDaiches, Ida Noyes YWCA Room, 8.Sixteenth Annual Mirror Revue, Leon Mandel Hall,8:30.Skull & Crescent, Meeting, Reynolds Club Lounge, 1.Mirrar ShawsHigh SchaalsCallage LifeSeven hundred high school seniorswill witness the Saturday matineeperformance of Mirror 1941 for ataste of the lighter side of life at theUniversity. They will be guests ofthe Student Publicity Board.Immediately following the final cur¬tain, a reception will be held in theReynolds Club Lounge. There thehigh school students will have an op¬portunity to meet members of theMirror cast and representatives ofthe various clubs and fraternities oncampus. Copies of the Daily Maroonand Pulse Magazine will be distrib¬uted to them.Balcony seats for the matinee willbe on sale for the general public.Levin to Speak onPost-War World“The World alter the War” will bethe main topic of discussion at thenext meeting of the SSA Division ofthe Campus Peace Committee. BenLevin, a Chicago attorney, will beguest speaker at the meeting whichwill be held at 7:30 on Monday inSocial Science 108.At the last meeting of the group,a six point program concerning thedraft, war profiteering, and con¬scription was adopted.Hutchins—(Continued from page one)“I am not optimistic about the future,”he admitted, “In fact I have staWthat we are only choosing the lesser oftwo unpleasant alternatives.”Need Only Common SenseHe felt, however, that it would notbe impossible for us to build ourselvesup morally and at the same time buildup a potent military machine.“How, possibly,” he asked, “Can wohope to build ourselves up, though,when we are in a war? Then, all at¬tention must be devoted to makingourselves militarily effective. At leastnow we can look toward the future(Continued on page three) •If Yoa Hare AFOREIGN ACCENTand It Botliera Yoa.THE ALL-AMERICAN CLUBFor speech and accent adjoatinentInvites ynu to a FREE and PRIVATEdiscussion of your particular problem.Call for Appointment. Ask for MisaMalkalL South Shore 6489.AVEANightlyLagerEither byYourself orwith '7oe"1512 E. 55th St.The Traveling BazaarBy P. C. RUBINSThen—Surrounded by a bevy of boys from Bursar WTlliamMather’s Home Guard and eager 0 and S members, fiveMaroon reporters sneaked in to get a preview of thisyear’s Mirror Show.The opening curtain reveals Ruth Steel, surroundedby Mirror Board members Evans, Mahon, Castleman,Hammel and Graver, plus a huge birthday cake and mil¬lions— really just fifty — candles. Enter the chorus.Shining lights in this number are Betty Barrickmanwho has the best grin that ever graced the Revue andRosalie Phillips and Fay Trolander who were easilyspotted by Bro Crane as the gals with the best gams.Pansy. . , displays Richard Charles Himmel tidily attired inan 1890 swim suit, attempting to intimidate tough life¬guard Don Wilson also nattily attired, Chloe Roth,playing en eight tenacled octapus, emotes like mad.Neatest trick of the week is done by Mary Hammel whoswirls across the stage as a mermaid in low tide.Later... on Albert Droste and Ardis Molitor give out in“One Night in Vienna” and Mirror technicians werebusily discussing the fact that from the song there hasdeveloped a campus romance. Perhaps the phone callin “You Look So Beautiful in Blue” isn’t just actingafter all. The Viennese waltz develops into a twirl racewith Bill Hochman perilously balancing a very scaredlooking Ruth W’ehlan on his shoulders.Sue Bohnen. . . chases Mart Hansen practically all over the backof a hatwagon putting over her amusing monologueconcerned with an 1892 woman’s conduct in a wagon.Finally the finale, introduced by R. F. Beyers and hisfreshman gymnasts. Very unkind was the remark of thefreshman woman who at this point said “Youks, theplace is beginning to smell like Bartlett.” However, theboys have practically the most beautiful bodies in theentire show.While... all this was going on publicity director Dotty Te-berg was anxiously watching Life photographer MyronDavis perilously sitting atop a ladder in the centeraisle. Davis, a former U of C student, covered the BigGreek War Relief banquet at New York and hustlesfrom coast to coast for Life. Press relations man CodyPhansteil was busy arranging things as campus photog¬raphers Steve Lewellyn, John Sanderson, Liz Felsan-thal tumbled around the stage.And Now—. . . Mirror swings into 1941. At this point chorinesArgiris, Barickman, Comstock, Deutsch, Geary, Ham¬mel, Mitchell, QuLsenberry, Scanlon, Sim.son, Smith, Tro¬lander and Vick swing their various appendages to playtunes with bells. The number is called appropriately,“Belles with Bells.”The Quizzie. . . kids busily smoking cigarettes give a perfect rep¬resentation of what the normal quiz program is like.Marian Castleman, Blanche Graver, Marty Hanson,Demmy Polachek, James Siemens all looking under tendo everything but try to get into the Rialto at children’sprices. The Mirror board follows with an all woman, allMirror Board, all out for defense skit. All out for de¬fense are the private future lives of the Mirror women.Parties. . . tonight after Mirror include the basketball dance,and a red hot open Psi U paily with a submarine mo¬tif. Saturday night the Phi Psis are throwing a brawl,likewise the Alpha Delta are having a party, only their’sis an open one.Club Cagers ClashBy NANCY LESSERSeveral new husbands are learning what it’s like togo through the winter months without a Universitygraduate in the kitchen; winter quarter has been wom¬en’s intramural basketball season and plenty of alumnihave been passing the better part of two nights a weekat Ida.Biggest feature will be the extra seasonal, super¬special Mortar Board-Quadie Alumni tangle some timeafter finals are played. Seems that MB challenged allQuad alums in calling distance for a game to end allgames in the long interclub basketball rivalry. IVJortarBoard Alumni sit smugly expectant of victory forthey’ve payed all winter, while Quadranglers expecttheir ancestors to win because they “haven’t wornthemselves out.” The MB team is; Curly topped.Lurena(Stubbs) Button, the Hutchinson twins, Marian Jern-berg, Jane Warren, Barbara Anderson,. and. KatherineBarnaby. - . .In the mean time Kelly Hall and the Employees havecharged through undefeated and are waiting for finalplayoffs Tuesday. Kelly captained by sturdy Ann Leon¬ard staged the biggest upset when they rocked thecradle of the maternity ward by beating the champion¬ship Lying-In nurses, esoterically named “Storks,”Wyvern 1, twice defeated, is waiting for the finals.Dearest:If it wasn't good I wouldn't ask you.But Rathe Newsreel has filmed it (forrelease Friday), and WGN has broad¬cast it from coast to coast, and nowLife magazine is coming out to photo¬graph it. Mirror must have somethingthis year. That's why I'm asking youto go with me to Mirror, because I wantonly the best things for you.Love,meDear me:You can get your tickets in the boxoffice in Mandel Hall corridor all dur¬ing the day.—the Mirror BoardMIRROR REVUE — FRIDAY EVENING AT 8:30<SATURDAY AT 8:30 AND 2:30Best bets for this years ball-hall immortality areDelta Sigma’s slippery sister act Pat and Jane Claridge;Miss Jones, a Stork; Mortar Board’s glitter gal, MikeRathje; Dee Carey, indispen.sable little dispenser ofstuff at the Bookstore; alumni Jane Warren, LurenaS. Button, Marian Jernberg; Kelly’s Elizabeth Wallen¬stein; and Elizabeth Yntemna of F.Y.C. Reds.y./ :Jj*Page TwoTHE DAILY MARCX)N. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1941%£ TnaADotiPOUNDED IN 1901Hyde P#rk 9221 and 9222. , nn,- pvii^f PHniina^ After 6:30 phone in storiea to our printers. The Chief Printing148 West 62nd street. Telephones: Wentworth 6123*”*The^\jniversity of Chicago assumes no responsibilitystatemenu appearing in The Daily Maroon, or for any contractUa^ty^Mar^nExpressly reserves the rightsany material appearing in this paper. Subscription rates: $3 a year.$4 by mail. Single copies: three cenU.Entered as second class matter March 18 1908 at the post officeSt Cfl**ago. Illinois, under the act of March 3. l»iv.Memberftssocided GDllG6icitG PressDistributor ofGollebiclie DibestBOARD OF CONTROLEditorialWlLl 1AM HANKLA PEARL C. RUBINS?RN#T S. LEISER JOHN P. STEVENS. ChairmanBusinessWILI.IAM LOVELL, Business ManagerWILLIAM KIMBALL. Advertising ManagerEDITORIAL ASSOCIATES . r^ : iJames Hurtle, Mark Fisher. Chester Hand, Richard Himmel. Dan elleslay, Richard Philbrick, Robert D. F. Reynolds, and DanielWinograd. BUSINESS ASSOCIATESRobert Dean, Lyle Harper, and Myles Jarrow.Night Editors: Willy Hankla and Charly DarraghSigns of the "Times"Apparently the University has gone “allout” for defense. .President Hutchins did not say this. On thecontrary, he has insisted, and with perfectjustification, that institutions of higher educa¬tion could serve defense needs much better byremaining institutions of higher education. Hehas pleaded that turning American universitiesinto armed camps or into laboratories whereskilled military technicians are trained, wouldbe fatal to true education. He has rightlystressed the far greater importance of moraland intellectual training to permanent defense.Tabloid BlurtsMr. Hutchins has not said that the Univer¬sity is “all out” for defense, but a publicationcalled the “Anniversary Times,” issued byFiftieth Anniversary workers with the ap¬proval of the administration, has—has blurtedit out in tabloid size headlines. Most of thepages of the “Times,” in fact, were devoted tothe University’s accomplishments in defense.Only a statement by the President and an edi¬torial stressed the long-run concerns of Chica¬go.The newspaper-bulletin was a skillfully pre¬sented, well-organized instrument of propagan¬da issued in the noble cause of the FiftiethAnniversary. It is too bad that it had to stressthe less important, less lasting aspects of theschool.False ImpressionLuckily, the University is not “all out” fordefense. The impression given that our scholarshave forsaken their important research in orderto feverishly search for the hidden weaponwhich will win the next war is a false one. But,because it is false, it is an unfortunate one.Those people who read the “AnniversaryTimes” will see a picture of Chicago which isnot a true one. The University'is strong enoughto live because of its own instrinsic merits. Itis too bad that overzealous publicity men haveundertaken to paint a false picture of its activ¬ities, a picture that may be harmful, and cer¬tainly undignified.There has been offered the excuse that thisis only one of a series of proposed bulletinsshowing various phases of the University’swork. This is only a partial excuse, since thefirst issue would have better shown the Univer¬sity’s most valuable contributions to America.We hope, however, that future issues of suchbulletins, if they come out, will display moreaccurately just what goes on at the University.E. S. L.Today on QuadranglesNoon Phonograph Concert, Social Science AssemblyHall, 12:30.Calvert Club, Illustrated Lecture, “Trappist Monksin the Modern World,” Daniel Connell, Ida NoyesTheater, 4:30,Mathematical Biophysics Seminar, “MathematicalBiophysics of Phycho-Galvanic Reflex,” C. H. Combs,6822 Drexel Avenue, 4:30,Social Science Administration Banquet, BurtonCourt, 7.Hillel Foundation Friday Fireside, “Sensibility inModem Literature: Mann, Kafka, and Joyce,” DavidDaiches, Ida Noyes YWCA Room, 8.Sixteenth Annual Mirror Revue, Leon Mandel Hall,8:30.Skull & Crescent, Meeting, Reynolds Club Lounge, 1.Mirrar ShawsHigh SchaalsCallage LifeSeven hundred high school seniorswill witness the Saturday matineeperformance of Mirror 1941 for ataste of the lighter side of life at theUniversity. They will be guests ofthe Student Publicity Board.Immediately following the final cur¬tain, a reception will be held in theReynolds Club Lounge. There thehigh school students will have an op¬portunity to meet members of theMirror cast and representatives ofthe various clubs and fraternities oncampus. Copies of the Daily Maroonand Pulse Magazine will be distrib¬uted to them.Balcony seats for the matinee willbe on sale for the general public.Levin to Speak onPost-War World“The World alter the War” will bethe main topic of discussion at thenext meeting of the SSA Division ofthe Campus Peace Committee. BenLevin, a Chicago attorney, will beguest speaker at the meeting whichwill be held at 7:30 on Monday inSocial Science 108.At the last meeting of the group,a six point program concerning thedraft, war profiteering, and con¬scription was adopted.Hutchins—(Continued from page one)“I am not optimistic about the future,”he admitted, “In fact I have staWthat we are only choosing the lesser oftwo unpleasant alternatives.”Need Only Common SenseHe felt, however, that it would notbe impossible for us to build ourselvesup morally and at the same time buildup a potent military machine.“How, possibly,” he asked, “Can wohope to build ourselves up, though,when we are in a war? Then, all at¬tention must be devoted to makingourselves militarily effective. At leastnow we can look toward the future(Continued on page three) •If Yoa Hare AFOREIGN ACCENTand It Botliera Yoa.THE ALL-AMERICAN CLUBFor speech and accent adjoatinentInvites ynu to a FREE and PRIVATEdiscussion of your particular problem.Call for Appointment. Ask for MisaMalkalL South Shore 6489.AVEANightlyLagerEither byYourself orwith '7oe"1512 E. 55th St.The Traveling BazaarBy P. C. RUBINSThen—Surrounded by a bevy of boys from Bursar WTlliamMather’s Home Guard and eager 0 and S members, fiveMaroon reporters sneaked in to get a preview of thisyear’s Mirror Show.The opening curtain reveals Ruth Steel, surroundedby Mirror Board members Evans, Mahon, Castleman,Hammel and Graver, plus a huge birthday cake and mil¬lions— really just fifty — candles. Enter the chorus.Shining lights in this number are Betty Barrickmanwho has the best grin that ever graced the Revue andRosalie Phillips and Fay Trolander who were easilyspotted by Bro Crane as the gals with the best gams.Pansy. . , displays Richard Charles Himmel tidily attired inan 1890 swim suit, attempting to intimidate tough life¬guard Don Wilson also nattily attired, Chloe Roth,playing en eight tenacled octapus, emotes like mad.Neatest trick of the week is done by Mary Hammel whoswirls across the stage as a mermaid in low tide.Later... on Albert Droste and Ardis Molitor give out in“One Night in Vienna” and Mirror technicians werebusily discussing the fact that from the song there hasdeveloped a campus romance. Perhaps the phone callin “You Look So Beautiful in Blue” isn’t just actingafter all. The Viennese waltz develops into a twirl racewith Bill Hochman perilously balancing a very scaredlooking Ruth W’ehlan on his shoulders.Sue Bohnen. . . chases Mart Hansen practically all over the backof a hatwagon putting over her amusing monologueconcerned with an 1892 woman’s conduct in a wagon.Finally the finale, introduced by R. F. Beyers and hisfreshman gymnasts. Very unkind was the remark of thefreshman woman who at this point said “Youks, theplace is beginning to smell like Bartlett.” However, theboys have practically the most beautiful bodies in theentire show.While... all this was going on publicity director Dotty Te-berg was anxiously watching Life photographer MyronDavis perilously sitting atop a ladder in the centeraisle. Davis, a former U of C student, covered the BigGreek War Relief banquet at New York and hustlesfrom coast to coast for Life. Press relations man CodyPhansteil was busy arranging things as campus photog¬raphers Steve Lewellyn, John Sanderson, Liz Felsan-thal tumbled around the stage.And Now—. . . Mirror swings into 1941. At this point chorinesArgiris, Barickman, Comstock, Deutsch, Geary, Ham¬mel, Mitchell, QuLsenberry, Scanlon, Sim.son, Smith, Tro¬lander and Vick swing their various appendages to playtunes with bells. The number is called appropriately,“Belles with Bells.”The Quizzie. . . kids busily smoking cigarettes give a perfect rep¬resentation of what the normal quiz program is like.Marian Castleman, Blanche Graver, Marty Hanson,Demmy Polachek, James Siemens all looking under tendo everything but try to get into the Rialto at children’sprices. The Mirror board follows with an all woman, allMirror Board, all out for defense skit. All out for de¬fense are the private future lives of the Mirror women.Parties. . . tonight after Mirror include the basketball dance,and a red hot open Psi U paily with a submarine mo¬tif. Saturday night the Phi Psis are throwing a brawl,likewise the Alpha Delta are having a party, only their’sis an open one.Club Cagers ClashBy NANCY LESSERSeveral new husbands are learning what it’s like togo through the winter months without a Universitygraduate in the kitchen; winter quarter has been wom¬en’s intramural basketball season and plenty of alumnihave been passing the better part of two nights a weekat Ida.Biggest feature will be the extra seasonal, super¬special Mortar Board-Quadie Alumni tangle some timeafter finals are played. Seems that MB challenged allQuad alums in calling distance for a game to end allgames in the long interclub basketball rivalry. IVJortarBoard Alumni sit smugly expectant of victory forthey’ve payed all winter, while Quadranglers expecttheir ancestors to win because they “haven’t wornthemselves out.” The MB team is; Curly topped.Lurena(Stubbs) Button, the Hutchinson twins, Marian Jern-berg, Jane Warren, Barbara Anderson,. and. KatherineBarnaby. - . .In the mean time Kelly Hall and the Employees havecharged through undefeated and are waiting for finalplayoffs Tuesday. Kelly captained by sturdy Ann Leon¬ard staged the biggest upset when they rocked thecradle of the maternity ward by beating the champion¬ship Lying-In nurses, esoterically named “Storks,”Wyvern 1, twice defeated, is waiting for the finals.Dearest:If it wasn't good I wouldn't ask you.But Rathe Newsreel has filmed it (forrelease Friday), and WGN has broad¬cast it from coast to coast, and nowLife magazine is coming out to photo¬graph it. Mirror must have somethingthis year. That's why I'm asking youto go with me to Mirror, because I wantonly the best things for you.Love,meDear me:You can get your tickets in the boxoffice in Mandel Hall corridor all dur¬ing the day.—the Mirror BoardMIRROR REVUE — FRIDAY EVENING AT 8:30<SATURDAY AT 8:30 AND 2:30Best bets for this years ball-hall immortality areDelta Sigma’s slippery sister act Pat and Jane Claridge;Miss Jones, a Stork; Mortar Board’s glitter gal, MikeRathje; Dee Carey, indispen.sable little dispenser ofstuff at the Bookstore; alumni Jane Warren, LurenaS. Button, Marian Jernberg; Kelly’s Elizabeth Wallen¬stein; and Elizabeth Yntemna of F.Y.C. Reds.y./ :Jj*THE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1941PageAs I WasSaying-By BOB LAWSONMr. Robert LawsonSports EditorDaily MaroonDear Bob,On picking up my copy of yester¬day’s Maroon I was overjoyed to findthat you had at last used the paper’sleading wailing wall to orate on themiserable maladjustment of athleticsand education at the University ofChicago. My feelings almost reached(>c?tatic heights when you advocatedcompulsory physical education. But,those last two paragraphs—what amiserable letdown.“The administration.. .must realizethat athletic scholarships are no moreevil than are general scholarships.”Can you really be sincere about that?First of all, you are implying thatgeneral scholarships are an evil, butwe can just skip that point as beingtoo trivial to even discuss. Secondly,athletic scholarships are an evil, es-pecially at an institution of Chicago’stype.Not Enough MoneyChicago is a privately endowed in¬stitution and is not making moneyenough on athletics to provide scholar¬ships. Therefore, for every athleticscholarship given, one scholasticscholarship would have to be with¬drawn. Since education, whatever theword means, is the purpose of the in¬stitution, scholastic scholarshipsshould be given preference. I, person¬ally, know people who finished in theupper 100 of their high school classwho are not going to college becausethey couldn’t get scholarships. In themeantime, athletes, dumb athletes, arewasting educational facilities in manyAmerican institutions. I am not sayingthat all athletes are dumb but I do saythat the dumb one, who is in the ma¬jority, does not deserve a free “ride”.In baseball a great, system has beendeveloped. After high school a playercan play in a small minor league andget the experience to be a top manin his profession. Why should it bedifferent in football? Why should afootball player deprive a worthy per¬son of an education while he is learn¬ing to be an expert in a non-educa-tional field. Why can’t a farm footballsystem be developed to rid us of thesubsidization evil?Terrible ErrorFurthermore, Bob, you say thatthere are two ways of curing Chi¬cago’s ills. Drop inter-collegiate com¬petition entirely or practice subsidiza¬tion. This is a terrible error. Not ap¬proving of the latter course, there isno reason for adopting the former. In¬ter-collegiate athletics have great val¬ues and a golden middle-way shouldbe taken.Chicago should drop out of the BigTen. We are playing in a league whichis way above our heads. The otherschools in the conference emphasizeathletics. We do not. The other schoolsin the conference have Departments ofPhysical Education. We do not. Theother schools practice gross subsidi¬zation. We do to some extent but weare much purer than most schools.Other schools take in freshman classesthe size of our whole undergraduatef'tudent body. What chance have we tobe successful in major sports?No, Bob, let’s not take either ofyour courses. Let’s keep inter-col¬legiate athletics but let’s stay in ourown class.Yours,Werner A. Baum.Hutchins—(Continued from page two)with some degree of intelligence. Wenay forget long-run concerns in afrantic attempt to build a mightyarmed force. But if our leaders havecommon sense, this need not be thecase.”“Building up our army need be nomore disastrous than a severe depres-'^ion. And just as it is not necessary tolose democracy when we have a de¬pression, so we have a chance to mainrtain and even fortify it, if we stayout of war. Long term military prep¬aration cannot be compared with theravages of a long-term war. And whatassurances have we that if we do getinto a w'ar, it will not last as long aswe are warned the period of prepara¬tion against victorious Germany will:la.st?”It^s Stampf AgainstIllinois^ IndianaTolerant Nelson H. Norgren takeshis cellar-dwelling Maroons to UrbanaSaturday night to enact the role ofthe victim in the final Illinois hard¬wood murder drama of the season.The Maroons are quite accustomedto the part they are scheduled to playtomorrow night, for they performedthis same role with howling successagainst the Illini once before this year.In the first peformance, playing theirparts before a home audience with in¬calculable realism the Maroons rolledover and played dead to a final scriptthat read “Ill. 56 Chi. 29.”mini FarewellThe mini’s acting should be doublygood this time, for this is the lastchante many of their cast will haveto act opposite to such a company asthe Maroon entourage boasts. CaptainJohnny Drish, who has spent the win¬ter handicapped with a chain guardto keep his trick left shoulder in place,Hal Shapiro, Bob O’Neill and BobRichmond will make their final appear¬ance as members of the Tribe.The performances of Joe Stampf,naturally, and Bob Richmond, a gpiard,will be watched with more than usualinterest. Joe, known as Chicago’s bas¬ketball “Berwanger,”' is fighting forthe Conference scoring championship.He already has the new free throwrecord etched on Big Ten historybooks.Unknown RichmondRichmond’s case, however, is not sowell known. Ignored by the sports-writers, and not even picked to gaina regular berth on the disappointingIndian quintet, Richmond leads all BigTen guards in scoring with 87 points.His nearest rivals are Herb Brogan,the Wolverine, and Don Blemker, ofPurdue, who have totalled 79 and 76tallies respectively.This is the last traveling game ofthe catastrophic ’40-’41 basketball sea¬son for the Maroons. They come homeover the week-end, and will end theiryear of woe with a game against thesecond place Hoosiers from the Uni¬versity of Indiana. Indiana was pickedby almost everybody in the nation towalk away with the league race, buta beating by Purdue early in the se¬mester, and the recent crucial defeatby the winning Badgers have ruinedtheir pennant hopes.Wrestlii>g MeetThe University wrestling teamwill compete in a meet in the base¬ment of Bartlett Gymnasium at8:00 tomorrow evening. Northwest¬ern University will be the opponent.Trackmen MeetNorthwesternHere Tomorrow“We may be able to win, but we’llhave to work pretty hard,” answeredCoach Merriam when questioned asto the Chicago team’s chances againstNorthwestern tomorrow afternoon at2:30 in the Fieldhouse.Best bets as point getters appearthe mile run, with Ray Randall as abright hope, and the broad jump. Inthis latter event Jim Smith and Core-vant. Wildcat jumpers have both beenbeaten by Captain Jim Ray. Smithmay reverse the order of things onRay as they meet in the high jump,however. Smith tied for first in thisevent in last year’s Big Ten Confer¬ence meet.The appearance of Fred Horvathand Joe Finch will probably toss highand low hurdles to the Wildcats. My¬ron Piker, also first place man at lastyear’s Conference meet, should take60 yard dash honors from Chicago’sBud Long and Don Marrow. Al¬though Ed Thistlewaite reached the13 foot mark in last week’s competi¬tion, the Maroon’s Bob Kincheloeshould give him a close contest in thevault. High points in the shot com¬petition should fall to the Chicagoansthrough Hugh Rendleman.Last year’s contest was lost througha mishap in the mile relay. CoachMerriam believes that the same eventmay hold this year’s deciding points.Youth for DemocracyA special meeting of all mem¬bers of Youth for Democracy, allGreek students on campus, and allother students interested in GreekWar relief has been called for 3:30today in the Social Science lobby.Swimmers Hosts\To WisconsinDropped under the .600 mark forthe season by Illinois Wednesday, theswimming team plays host to Wiscon¬sin tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clockin the pool in Bartlett gymnasium.Able to take only three first placesWednesday, the Maroons went downby a 7 to 28 score in the Urbana meet.Bill Baugher won the 100-yard andI 220-yard free style events, and ArtBethke won his specialty, the 220-yard breast stroke.Coach MacGillivray took his chargesto Illinois expecting to win by aboutthe same score that the Illini did,but things got twisted around.The meet got off on the wrong footwhen Chicago’s 300-yard relay got be¬fuddled on their start and never didcatch up. From then on, it was justtoo many Illinois men in the first twoplaces.Coach MacGillivray rates the Badg¬er team on about the same level as theIllini and gives the Maroons a groodchance to win their fourth victory ofthe year as against four defeats.The MUSIC you want...When You WANT It!VICTOR RECORDSFlash! Jusi Out! Flash!"HOT Concerto for CLARINET'PLAYED BYARTIE SHAW & HIS ORCHESTRANOW ON SALECOMPLETE SHOWING OF ALL MODELS OFRCA VICTROLASIN THE SOUTH SIDE’S FINEST SALESROOMHERMAN'S RADIO SHOPHyd. Pk. 6200Midway 0009VJS t. ObTh M.At InglesideOPENEVERY EVENINGBIG PARTY?Use theSTUDENT RECORD PARTY SERVICEMusic Supplied and Conducted for Any OccasionSOUND SYSTEMS RECORD PLAYERS— RENTING RECORDS IS SMART ECONOMY! —Midway 6000 JIM RICHARD Judson CourtRepresentative of Hermanns Radio ShopTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1941PageAs I WasSaying-By BOB LAWSONMr. Robert LawsonSports EditorDaily MaroonDear Bob,On picking up my copy of yester¬day’s Maroon I was overjoyed to findthat you had at last used the paper’sleading wailing wall to orate on themiserable maladjustment of athleticsand education at the University ofChicago. My feelings almost reached(>c?tatic heights when you advocatedcompulsory physical education. But,those last two paragraphs—what amiserable letdown.“The administration.. .must realizethat athletic scholarships are no moreevil than are general scholarships.”Can you really be sincere about that?First of all, you are implying thatgeneral scholarships are an evil, butwe can just skip that point as beingtoo trivial to even discuss. Secondly,athletic scholarships are an evil, es-pecially at an institution of Chicago’stype.Not Enough MoneyChicago is a privately endowed in¬stitution and is not making moneyenough on athletics to provide scholar¬ships. Therefore, for every athleticscholarship given, one scholasticscholarship would have to be with¬drawn. Since education, whatever theword means, is the purpose of the in¬stitution, scholastic scholarshipsshould be given preference. I, person¬ally, know people who finished in theupper 100 of their high school classwho are not going to college becausethey couldn’t get scholarships. In themeantime, athletes, dumb athletes, arewasting educational facilities in manyAmerican institutions. I am not sayingthat all athletes are dumb but I do saythat the dumb one, who is in the ma¬jority, does not deserve a free “ride”.In baseball a great, system has beendeveloped. After high school a playercan play in a small minor league andget the experience to be a top manin his profession. Why should it bedifferent in football? Why should afootball player deprive a worthy per¬son of an education while he is learn¬ing to be an expert in a non-educa-tional field. Why can’t a farm footballsystem be developed to rid us of thesubsidization evil?Terrible ErrorFurthermore, Bob, you say thatthere are two ways of curing Chi¬cago’s ills. Drop inter-collegiate com¬petition entirely or practice subsidiza¬tion. This is a terrible error. Not ap¬proving of the latter course, there isno reason for adopting the former. In¬ter-collegiate athletics have great val¬ues and a golden middle-way shouldbe taken.Chicago should drop out of the BigTen. We are playing in a league whichis way above our heads. The otherschools in the conference emphasizeathletics. We do not. The other schoolsin the conference have Departments ofPhysical Education. We do not. Theother schools practice gross subsidi¬zation. We do to some extent but weare much purer than most schools.Other schools take in freshman classesthe size of our whole undergraduatef'tudent body. What chance have we tobe successful in major sports?No, Bob, let’s not take either ofyour courses. Let’s keep inter-col¬legiate athletics but let’s stay in ourown class.Yours,Werner A. Baum.Hutchins—(Continued from page two)with some degree of intelligence. Wenay forget long-run concerns in afrantic attempt to build a mightyarmed force. But if our leaders havecommon sense, this need not be thecase.”“Building up our army need be nomore disastrous than a severe depres-'^ion. And just as it is not necessary tolose democracy when we have a de¬pression, so we have a chance to mainrtain and even fortify it, if we stayout of war. Long term military prep¬aration cannot be compared with theravages of a long-term war. And whatassurances have we that if we do getinto a w'ar, it will not last as long aswe are warned the period of prepara¬tion against victorious Germany will:la.st?”It^s Stampf AgainstIllinois^ IndianaTolerant Nelson H. Norgren takeshis cellar-dwelling Maroons to UrbanaSaturday night to enact the role ofthe victim in the final Illinois hard¬wood murder drama of the season.The Maroons are quite accustomedto the part they are scheduled to playtomorrow night, for they performedthis same role with howling successagainst the Illini once before this year.In the first peformance, playing theirparts before a home audience with in¬calculable realism the Maroons rolledover and played dead to a final scriptthat read “Ill. 56 Chi. 29.”mini FarewellThe mini’s acting should be doublygood this time, for this is the lastchante many of their cast will haveto act opposite to such a company asthe Maroon entourage boasts. CaptainJohnny Drish, who has spent the win¬ter handicapped with a chain guardto keep his trick left shoulder in place,Hal Shapiro, Bob O’Neill and BobRichmond will make their final appear¬ance as members of the Tribe.The performances of Joe Stampf,naturally, and Bob Richmond, a gpiard,will be watched with more than usualinterest. Joe, known as Chicago’s bas¬ketball “Berwanger,”' is fighting forthe Conference scoring championship.He already has the new free throwrecord etched on Big Ten historybooks.Unknown RichmondRichmond’s case, however, is not sowell known. Ignored by the sports-writers, and not even picked to gaina regular berth on the disappointingIndian quintet, Richmond leads all BigTen guards in scoring with 87 points.His nearest rivals are Herb Brogan,the Wolverine, and Don Blemker, ofPurdue, who have totalled 79 and 76tallies respectively.This is the last traveling game ofthe catastrophic ’40-’41 basketball sea¬son for the Maroons. They come homeover the week-end, and will end theiryear of woe with a game against thesecond place Hoosiers from the Uni¬versity of Indiana. Indiana was pickedby almost everybody in the nation towalk away with the league race, buta beating by Purdue early in the se¬mester, and the recent crucial defeatby the winning Badgers have ruinedtheir pennant hopes.Wrestlii>g MeetThe University wrestling teamwill compete in a meet in the base¬ment of Bartlett Gymnasium at8:00 tomorrow evening. Northwest¬ern University will be the opponent.Trackmen MeetNorthwesternHere Tomorrow“We may be able to win, but we’llhave to work pretty hard,” answeredCoach Merriam when questioned asto the Chicago team’s chances againstNorthwestern tomorrow afternoon at2:30 in the Fieldhouse.Best bets as point getters appearthe mile run, with Ray Randall as abright hope, and the broad jump. Inthis latter event Jim Smith and Core-vant. Wildcat jumpers have both beenbeaten by Captain Jim Ray. Smithmay reverse the order of things onRay as they meet in the high jump,however. Smith tied for first in thisevent in last year’s Big Ten Confer¬ence meet.The appearance of Fred Horvathand Joe Finch will probably toss highand low hurdles to the Wildcats. My¬ron Piker, also first place man at lastyear’s Conference meet, should take60 yard dash honors from Chicago’sBud Long and Don Marrow. Al¬though Ed Thistlewaite reached the13 foot mark in last week’s competi¬tion, the Maroon’s Bob Kincheloeshould give him a close contest in thevault. High points in the shot com¬petition should fall to the Chicagoansthrough Hugh Rendleman.Last year’s contest was lost througha mishap in the mile relay. CoachMerriam believes that the same eventmay hold this year’s deciding points.Youth for DemocracyA special meeting of all mem¬bers of Youth for Democracy, allGreek students on campus, and allother students interested in GreekWar relief has been called for 3:30today in the Social Science lobby.Swimmers Hosts\To WisconsinDropped under the .600 mark forthe season by Illinois Wednesday, theswimming team plays host to Wiscon¬sin tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clockin the pool in Bartlett gymnasium.Able to take only three first placesWednesday, the Maroons went downby a 7 to 28 score in the Urbana meet.Bill Baugher won the 100-yard andI 220-yard free style events, and ArtBethke won his specialty, the 220-yard breast stroke.Coach MacGillivray took his chargesto Illinois expecting to win by aboutthe same score that the Illini did,but things got twisted around.The meet got off on the wrong footwhen Chicago’s 300-yard relay got be¬fuddled on their start and never didcatch up. From then on, it was justtoo many Illinois men in the first twoplaces.Coach MacGillivray rates the Badg¬er team on about the same level as theIllini and gives the Maroons a groodchance to win their fourth victory ofthe year as against four defeats.The MUSIC you want...When You WANT It!VICTOR RECORDSFlash! Jusi Out! Flash!"HOT Concerto for CLARINET'PLAYED BYARTIE SHAW & HIS ORCHESTRANOW ON SALECOMPLETE SHOWING OF ALL MODELS OFRCA VICTROLASIN THE SOUTH SIDE’S FINEST SALESROOMHERMAN'S RADIO SHOPHyd. Pk. 6200Midway 0009VJS t. ObTh M.At InglesideOPENEVERY EVENINGBIG PARTY?Use theSTUDENT RECORD PARTY SERVICEMusic Supplied and Conducted for Any OccasionSOUND SYSTEMS RECORD PLAYERS— RENTING RECORDS IS SMART ECONOMY! —Midway 6000 JIM RICHARD Judson CourtRepresentative of Hermanns Radio ShopPage FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 1941Universit/s ExpensesA Million Over IncomeDaines Releases Figures; Re¬veals Need for Funds; Dueto Low Rate of Return.By HARVEY C. DAINESComptroller, University of ChicagoIn the fiscal year 1939-40, the Uni¬versity of Chicago’s recurring ex¬penses once again exceeded its recur¬ring income by more than a milliondollars.This disparity between income andexpense is the result of the low rateof return on investments and occuiTedin spite of most rigid economies inoperation. The gap can be closedeither by raising new funds or byfurther economies that will seriouslycripple the University. The 50th an¬niversary campaign is being conductedto raise new funds.At the close of the fiscal year, whichended on June 30, 1940, the assets ofthe University totaled $128,536,026,of which $72,502,176 was in the formof endowment, $44,468,790 was invest¬ed in campus, buildings and equip¬ment and the balance of $11,565,060was distributed under the categoriesof general, loan, annuity and plantreplacement funds. During the fiscalyear just closed the University’s as¬sets were increased by $3,099,172.Since the financial affairs of theUniversity date from its incorporationin 1890, the fiscal year ended on June30,1940, was the fiftieth fiscal year ofthe University.Big Endowment FundAt present the endowment funds ofChicago are exceeded only by those ofHarvard and Yale, the former being300 years old and the latter more than200 years. In the history of educa¬tional institutions, this rapid growthof the University of Chicago hasnever been surpassed.Despite this impressive growth inassets, the University’s operating po¬sition has been greatly imperiled inrecent years through the reduction inthe rate of return on endowment,which has declined from 6.2 per centin 1929-30 to 4.17 per cent in 1939-40.Since endowment is of value only forthe income produced, this reductionSpecial lorMarch 3, 4, SthTwo oiinces tobacco free with•very dollar or better pipe.CAMPUSTOBACCONISTS1324 E. 57th StUNIVERSITYTAVERN1131 & 1133 E 55th StANDLIQUOR STOREFREE DELIVERYMIDWAY 0524COMPLETE LINE OFBEER - WINES - UQUORSWE FEATUREBlotz and Siebens Beersin capital productivity is equivalentto a loss of 32.7 per cent in endow¬ment principal.Stated in another way, if the Uni-j versity were able to earn at the pres¬ent time the same annual rate of re¬turn which it received in 1929-30, thepresent endowment income would beincreased by approximately $1,500,000.This additional income would morethan take up the spread between re¬curring income and expenditures inthe regular budget of the University.During the year 1939-40 the grossoperating income aggregated $10,760,-171 against gross expenditures of$10,749,609, leaving an excess incomeof $10,562. The gross income includedconsumable gifts of $1,731,517, or 16.1per cent, of which $1,066,029 con¬sisted of special gifts received in prioryears which were applied to the sup¬port of the 1939-40 operations. It isfor the purpose .of providing currentfunds to fill this gap between recur¬ring income and expenditures that the50th anniversary campaign is now be¬ing conducted.Real Estate TaxesReal estate taxes paid by the Uni¬versity directly or indirectly throughlessees on investment properties ownedby the University amounted to $833,-387 for the year.During the year, gifts paid in forall purposes amounted to $5,110,987,of which $2,626,624 w'as for endow¬ment and the balance was for re¬stricted capital purposes, restrictedcurrent purposes, or unrestricted pur¬poses.The student fee income was $2,522,-409, or $83,083 more than for the pre¬vious year. The total number of dif¬ferent students enrolled was 11,674,a decrease of 6.7 per cent from theprior year. The gain in income isaccounted for by an increase in spe¬cial fee rates, effective during theyear concluded. The student fee in¬come for 1939-40 was the highest inthe history of the University with thesingle exception of the peak year1930-31. Student fees provided 23.4per cent of the total income of theUniversity.The total market value (appraisalsfor real estate) of all investmentsowned by the University at the closeof the year was $6,254,208, or 8.2 percent, less than the book value of$76,698,740; a year ago the shrinkagewas $4,349,622, or 5.6 per cent. Forstocks and bonds alone the marketwas $4,944,301, or 10.0 per cent, lessthan book value, whereas at the closeof the previous year the decline was$2,581,869, or 5.1 per cent.Human ProgressFinancial and other data cannot inthe very nature of the case reflect thecontribution to human progress whichhas been made possible through thegifts of donors and the devotion ofthose who have served the Universityas members of its staff and its boardof trustees. The output of the Uni¬versity in the instruction of youth, thepioneering of educational methods,and the discovery of knowledge doesnot readily lend itself to precise meas¬urement.Moreover, the underlying financialcondition of the University is mostinadequately reflected in its balancesheet. While its assets may seemlarge, its financial position must bedetermined by placing these resourcesside by side with its needs, obligationsand opportunities for the bettei’mentof society and the enrichment of life.On this basis its liabilities greatly ex¬ceed its assets.It is the belief of the administrationthat a further reduction in expendi¬tures of any significant amount willgreatly jeopardize the quality of itswork.Why AidFor GreeceA BULL SESSIONBy Dick Philbrickand Betty Mueller 'Well, Mr. Zagorin, out of that massof verbiage you have written for theMaroon, a reasonable question has fi¬nally emerged. Why is Youth for De¬mocracy, that stalwart defender of thedemocratic way, interested in the suc¬cess of totalitarian Greece in its fightagainst Italy?Greece Serves CauseThe answer involves the acceptanceof opportunist methods, the methodsby which the Axis has achieved manyof its sucesses, and one of the ways,it seems, by which the democraciescan operate to assure their continuedexistance.At the moment Greece, Fascist orno, is fighting for a victoi*y which ifwon will advance enormously thecause of the democratic nations. Nowor later, says Youth for Democracy,Italy and its axis partners must bedefeated; they must be brought toterms if democracies wish to exist assuch in the future. Greece, it seems, isone means by which that essentialvictory may be gain^.This attitude toward Greece is theoutgrowth of an aspect of our foreignpolicy which the United States adoptedearly in President Roosevelt’s first ad¬ministration, When this country firstbegan a definite program of concilia¬tion with South American countries weaccepted the fact that we must main¬tain friendly relations with the dic¬tatorships as well as the democraciesthere.Doubtful Democracy In ChinaAnd when we began, woefully late,to help the struggling Chinese fightingin the armies of Chang Kai-Shek wedid so with the knowledge that theGeneralissimo’s constituents are onlyone faction among many in China. Andwhether his i*egime is democratic ornot is open to doubt.We support China’s resistance toJapan, in part at least, because it isfighting a member of the Axis. We arebacking Greece because our supportmay serve to keep Turkey, Bulgaria,and other countries of the Near Easton the side of the Allies. But this aidin no way indicates any liking for theform of government that exists inGreece. And it would be absurd to saythat we wish to aid Greece in orderto keep mankind at one another’sthroats.Opportunity to ExistThe question which overshadows allothers today is whether the democraticway of living shall have an opportunityto continue to exist. If, Mr. Zagorin,you consider world conditions today interms of how the world will be nextmonth, next year, and twenty yearsfrom now if the Greeks and their al¬lies fail to win, you may eventuallyperceive why Youth for Democracy issupporting the Greek war effort.Cap And GownCall For BeautyIssues LastContestantsNominations for the Cap and GownBeauty Contest will close tonight at6. Until that time nominations will beaccepted at the yearbook’s LexingtonHall Office.With one day to go. Esoteric hasa third of the nominations. BesidesAnn Haight whose name was previ¬ously posted, the club has nominatedJanet Wagner, Mary Reay, DorisDaniels, Florence Daniels, Marge Ex¬eter, and Clarissa Rahill. DorothyLetters tothe EditorBoard of Control,The Daily Maroon:Why all the complaint about Stu¬dent Health ? Granted that there is anoccasional break in the routine of ex¬amination and treatment, the hospitalaccomplishes a huge task in caring forthe health of several thousand stu¬dents with admirable efficiency andskill.For every regrettable incident of al¬leged neglect or maltreatment, thereare hundreds of causes where the in¬dividual receives prompt attention.That this is not recorded by the pressfor the sensation-loving public is un¬derstandable, for it is always the ex¬ception, the rare accident that attractsnotice. Minor mistakes are bound tooccur whenever a large staff has topei-form a multiplicity of duties.Last week I had occasion to visitStudent Health. Like everyone elsewhom I saw there, within 15 minutesI had a conference with an experi¬enced, friendly doctor, fully capable ofcaring for the dozens of students whocame in that day. I know that mytreatment was no better than that ofany others there.Instead of criticizing the hospitalfor its occasional faults, the studentsought to realize the debt of gratitudeit owes Billings for providing such anadequate health service.Craig LemanStudents VisitBahai TempleChicago’s famous Bahai Temple willbe visited Sunday by members of theChurch Visiting Committee, which issponsored by several Chapel groups.The Committee which was formedto give its members a chance to visitdifferent churches, went to the Christ¬ian Science church last week.Metcalf—(Continued from page one)programs, and activities stressingheavy athletics.3. Extend facilities of instructionand recreation on the college campusto men in nearby military camp.s, anddefense industries.“Regardless of our attitude towardthe Aid to Britain controversy,’’ Met¬calf said, “we must realize that thecurrent all-out effort for defense re¬quires, more than ever before, menand women with abundant health, andwith great stamina and endurance. Itrequires clear thinking, socially well-adjusted individuals with a deep-root¬ed belief in the democratic way of life.We need men and women who havethe right attitude toward work andtoward play and who will have soundjudgment in times of stress.’’Mirrorr-(Continued from page one)Betty Ann Evans, making her stagedebut as a singer, is throatily wistful,when she whispers “As I Gave MyHeart to You’’, and Ardis Molitor issmoothly professional in both hersolos and her duets with AlbertDroste.The tuneful “Bell Dance’’ is possi-‘ bly the most entertaining of thechorus routines, with the first act“Can-C^n’’ finale the best costumedand the moat appropriate. The firsthalf of the Viennese Waltz is excel¬lent, but when the chorus boys comein, the only excuse for them is thattheir red dinner jackets make a color¬ful spectacle. The parade of the beau¬ty queens in W-G-N’s “hit tune’’ of theshow, “So Beautiful in Blue’’ was ef¬fectively staged, and emphasized thesong well.Sets for this production were un¬imaginative and inadequate.This year’s Mirror Board, whichperpetuated itself in a mildly amusingskit called “Those Women’’, consistsof President Ruth Steel, Marian Cas-tleman, Betty Ann Evans, BlancheGraver, Mary Hammel and HenriettaMahon.Tuell is as yet the only Independentin the running. New entries of otherclubs are Mary Toft and Fran Cuttleof Wyvem, Quadranglers Rosalie Phil¬lips and Patty Wolfhope, LorraineKlein and Jane Moran of Sigma, Mor¬tar Board’s pride Ginny Ailing, andCarolyn Vick of Delta Sigma.Subscriptions used previously tonominate girls are void.LEARN TO DANCE CORRECTLYTak* a Faw Privata LauontTERESA DOLANIS4S E. 43 naar Stony Island Ava.Hours 10 A.M. to 10 P.M.—Sundays I to 9Tal. Hyda Park 3060Life Member of the Chicago Associationof Dancing Masters.4 MONTH INTENSIVE COUtSIrot COllEGC STUDENTS AND CKAOUATMA OerawyA,moserBUSINESS COLLEGEPAUi Mostt. j.a,.PH.aRtguimt C»mrwm^ B4gmmmt,aAmtttiigkSchool Grmdmotoo om^, ttmrt^ omek tmomlh. Adomnsr4 Comnn $tmrtMomdoy- D*P RPawimCount* open to nnn.116 S. AAiebigon Aea., Chicago, Kamdolpk 4S4}For YourCOLLEGENIGHTEntertainmentEveryFriday★ ★New Professional FloorShows and CollegeTalent★ ★GET STUDENTS RATETICKETS AT MAROONOFFICE★ ★Marine Dining RoomEDGEWATERBEACHHOTEL5300 BlockSheridan RoadPage FourTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 1941Universit/s ExpensesA Million Over IncomeDaines Releases Figures; Re¬veals Need for Funds; Dueto Low Rate of Return.By HARVEY C. DAINESComptroller, University of ChicagoIn the fiscal year 1939-40, the Uni¬versity of Chicago’s recurring ex¬penses once again exceeded its recur¬ring income by more than a milliondollars.This disparity between income andexpense is the result of the low rateof return on investments and occuiTedin spite of most rigid economies inoperation. The gap can be closedeither by raising new funds or byfurther economies that will seriouslycripple the University. The 50th an¬niversary campaign is being conductedto raise new funds.At the close of the fiscal year, whichended on June 30, 1940, the assets ofthe University totaled $128,536,026,of which $72,502,176 was in the formof endowment, $44,468,790 was invest¬ed in campus, buildings and equip¬ment and the balance of $11,565,060was distributed under the categoriesof general, loan, annuity and plantreplacement funds. During the fiscalyear just closed the University’s as¬sets were increased by $3,099,172.Since the financial affairs of theUniversity date from its incorporationin 1890, the fiscal year ended on June30,1940, was the fiftieth fiscal year ofthe University.Big Endowment FundAt present the endowment funds ofChicago are exceeded only by those ofHarvard and Yale, the former being300 years old and the latter more than200 years. In the history of educa¬tional institutions, this rapid growthof the University of Chicago hasnever been surpassed.Despite this impressive growth inassets, the University’s operating po¬sition has been greatly imperiled inrecent years through the reduction inthe rate of return on endowment,which has declined from 6.2 per centin 1929-30 to 4.17 per cent in 1939-40.Since endowment is of value only forthe income produced, this reductionSpecial lorMarch 3, 4, SthTwo oiinces tobacco free with•very dollar or better pipe.CAMPUSTOBACCONISTS1324 E. 57th StUNIVERSITYTAVERN1131 & 1133 E 55th StANDLIQUOR STOREFREE DELIVERYMIDWAY 0524COMPLETE LINE OFBEER - WINES - UQUORSWE FEATUREBlotz and Siebens Beersin capital productivity is equivalentto a loss of 32.7 per cent in endow¬ment principal.Stated in another way, if the Uni-j versity were able to earn at the pres¬ent time the same annual rate of re¬turn which it received in 1929-30, thepresent endowment income would beincreased by approximately $1,500,000.This additional income would morethan take up the spread between re¬curring income and expenditures inthe regular budget of the University.During the year 1939-40 the grossoperating income aggregated $10,760,-171 against gross expenditures of$10,749,609, leaving an excess incomeof $10,562. The gross income includedconsumable gifts of $1,731,517, or 16.1per cent, of which $1,066,029 con¬sisted of special gifts received in prioryears which were applied to the sup¬port of the 1939-40 operations. It isfor the purpose .of providing currentfunds to fill this gap between recur¬ring income and expenditures that the50th anniversary campaign is now be¬ing conducted.Real Estate TaxesReal estate taxes paid by the Uni¬versity directly or indirectly throughlessees on investment properties ownedby the University amounted to $833,-387 for the year.During the year, gifts paid in forall purposes amounted to $5,110,987,of which $2,626,624 w'as for endow¬ment and the balance was for re¬stricted capital purposes, restrictedcurrent purposes, or unrestricted pur¬poses.The student fee income was $2,522,-409, or $83,083 more than for the pre¬vious year. The total number of dif¬ferent students enrolled was 11,674,a decrease of 6.7 per cent from theprior year. The gain in income isaccounted for by an increase in spe¬cial fee rates, effective during theyear concluded. The student fee in¬come for 1939-40 was the highest inthe history of the University with thesingle exception of the peak year1930-31. Student fees provided 23.4per cent of the total income of theUniversity.The total market value (appraisalsfor real estate) of all investmentsowned by the University at the closeof the year was $6,254,208, or 8.2 percent, less than the book value of$76,698,740; a year ago the shrinkagewas $4,349,622, or 5.6 per cent. Forstocks and bonds alone the marketwas $4,944,301, or 10.0 per cent, lessthan book value, whereas at the closeof the previous year the decline was$2,581,869, or 5.1 per cent.Human ProgressFinancial and other data cannot inthe very nature of the case reflect thecontribution to human progress whichhas been made possible through thegifts of donors and the devotion ofthose who have served the Universityas members of its staff and its boardof trustees. The output of the Uni¬versity in the instruction of youth, thepioneering of educational methods,and the discovery of knowledge doesnot readily lend itself to precise meas¬urement.Moreover, the underlying financialcondition of the University is mostinadequately reflected in its balancesheet. While its assets may seemlarge, its financial position must bedetermined by placing these resourcesside by side with its needs, obligationsand opportunities for the bettei’mentof society and the enrichment of life.On this basis its liabilities greatly ex¬ceed its assets.It is the belief of the administrationthat a further reduction in expendi¬tures of any significant amount willgreatly jeopardize the quality of itswork.Why AidFor GreeceA BULL SESSIONBy Dick Philbrickand Betty Mueller 'Well, Mr. Zagorin, out of that massof verbiage you have written for theMaroon, a reasonable question has fi¬nally emerged. Why is Youth for De¬mocracy, that stalwart defender of thedemocratic way, interested in the suc¬cess of totalitarian Greece in its fightagainst Italy?Greece Serves CauseThe answer involves the acceptanceof opportunist methods, the methodsby which the Axis has achieved manyof its sucesses, and one of the ways,it seems, by which the democraciescan operate to assure their continuedexistance.At the moment Greece, Fascist orno, is fighting for a victoi*y which ifwon will advance enormously thecause of the democratic nations. Nowor later, says Youth for Democracy,Italy and its axis partners must bedefeated; they must be brought toterms if democracies wish to exist assuch in the future. Greece, it seems, isone means by which that essentialvictory may be gain^.This attitude toward Greece is theoutgrowth of an aspect of our foreignpolicy which the United States adoptedearly in President Roosevelt’s first ad¬ministration, When this country firstbegan a definite program of concilia¬tion with South American countries weaccepted the fact that we must main¬tain friendly relations with the dic¬tatorships as well as the democraciesthere.Doubtful Democracy In ChinaAnd when we began, woefully late,to help the struggling Chinese fightingin the armies of Chang Kai-Shek wedid so with the knowledge that theGeneralissimo’s constituents are onlyone faction among many in China. Andwhether his i*egime is democratic ornot is open to doubt.We support China’s resistance toJapan, in part at least, because it isfighting a member of the Axis. We arebacking Greece because our supportmay serve to keep Turkey, Bulgaria,and other countries of the Near Easton the side of the Allies. But this aidin no way indicates any liking for theform of government that exists inGreece. And it would be absurd to saythat we wish to aid Greece in orderto keep mankind at one another’sthroats.Opportunity to ExistThe question which overshadows allothers today is whether the democraticway of living shall have an opportunityto continue to exist. If, Mr. Zagorin,you consider world conditions today interms of how the world will be nextmonth, next year, and twenty yearsfrom now if the Greeks and their al¬lies fail to win, you may eventuallyperceive why Youth for Democracy issupporting the Greek war effort.Cap And GownCall For BeautyIssues LastContestantsNominations for the Cap and GownBeauty Contest will close tonight at6. Until that time nominations will beaccepted at the yearbook’s LexingtonHall Office.With one day to go. Esoteric hasa third of the nominations. BesidesAnn Haight whose name was previ¬ously posted, the club has nominatedJanet Wagner, Mary Reay, DorisDaniels, Florence Daniels, Marge Ex¬eter, and Clarissa Rahill. DorothyLetters tothe EditorBoard of Control,The Daily Maroon:Why all the complaint about Stu¬dent Health ? Granted that there is anoccasional break in the routine of ex¬amination and treatment, the hospitalaccomplishes a huge task in caring forthe health of several thousand stu¬dents with admirable efficiency andskill.For every regrettable incident of al¬leged neglect or maltreatment, thereare hundreds of causes where the in¬dividual receives prompt attention.That this is not recorded by the pressfor the sensation-loving public is un¬derstandable, for it is always the ex¬ception, the rare accident that attractsnotice. Minor mistakes are bound tooccur whenever a large staff has topei-form a multiplicity of duties.Last week I had occasion to visitStudent Health. Like everyone elsewhom I saw there, within 15 minutesI had a conference with an experi¬enced, friendly doctor, fully capable ofcaring for the dozens of students whocame in that day. I know that mytreatment was no better than that ofany others there.Instead of criticizing the hospitalfor its occasional faults, the studentsought to realize the debt of gratitudeit owes Billings for providing such anadequate health service.Craig LemanStudents VisitBahai TempleChicago’s famous Bahai Temple willbe visited Sunday by members of theChurch Visiting Committee, which issponsored by several Chapel groups.The Committee which was formedto give its members a chance to visitdifferent churches, went to the Christ¬ian Science church last week.Metcalf—(Continued from page one)programs, and activities stressingheavy athletics.3. Extend facilities of instructionand recreation on the college campusto men in nearby military camp.s, anddefense industries.“Regardless of our attitude towardthe Aid to Britain controversy,’’ Met¬calf said, “we must realize that thecurrent all-out effort for defense re¬quires, more than ever before, menand women with abundant health, andwith great stamina and endurance. Itrequires clear thinking, socially well-adjusted individuals with a deep-root¬ed belief in the democratic way of life.We need men and women who havethe right attitude toward work andtoward play and who will have soundjudgment in times of stress.’’Mirrorr-(Continued from page one)Betty Ann Evans, making her stagedebut as a singer, is throatily wistful,when she whispers “As I Gave MyHeart to You’’, and Ardis Molitor issmoothly professional in both hersolos and her duets with AlbertDroste.The tuneful “Bell Dance’’ is possi-‘ bly the most entertaining of thechorus routines, with the first act“Can-C^n’’ finale the best costumedand the moat appropriate. The firsthalf of the Viennese Waltz is excel¬lent, but when the chorus boys comein, the only excuse for them is thattheir red dinner jackets make a color¬ful spectacle. The parade of the beau¬ty queens in W-G-N’s “hit tune’’ of theshow, “So Beautiful in Blue’’ was ef¬fectively staged, and emphasized thesong well.Sets for this production were un¬imaginative and inadequate.This year’s Mirror Board, whichperpetuated itself in a mildly amusingskit called “Those Women’’, consistsof President Ruth Steel, Marian Cas-tleman, Betty Ann Evans, BlancheGraver, Mary Hammel and HenriettaMahon.Tuell is as yet the only Independentin the running. New entries of otherclubs are Mary Toft and Fran Cuttleof Wyvem, Quadranglers Rosalie Phil¬lips and Patty Wolfhope, LorraineKlein and Jane Moran of Sigma, Mor¬tar Board’s pride Ginny Ailing, andCarolyn Vick of Delta Sigma.Subscriptions used previously tonominate girls are void.LEARN TO DANCE CORRECTLYTak* a Faw Privata LauontTERESA DOLANIS4S E. 43 naar Stony Island Ava.Hours 10 A.M. to 10 P.M.—Sundays I to 9Tal. Hyda Park 3060Life Member of the Chicago Associationof Dancing Masters.4 MONTH INTENSIVE COUtSIrot COllEGC STUDENTS AND CKAOUATMA OerawyA,moserBUSINESS COLLEGEPAUi Mostt. j.a,.PH.aRtguimt C»mrwm^ B4gmmmt,aAmtttiigkSchool Grmdmotoo om^, ttmrt^ omek tmomlh. Adomnsr4 Comnn $tmrtMomdoy- D*P RPawimCount* open to nnn.116 S. AAiebigon Aea., Chicago, Kamdolpk 4S4}For YourCOLLEGENIGHTEntertainmentEveryFriday★ ★New Professional FloorShows and CollegeTalent★ ★GET STUDENTS RATETICKETS AT MAROONOFFICE★ ★Marine Dining RoomEDGEWATERBEACHHOTEL5300 BlockSheridan RoadTakinf One to Givo TwoBill Morgan, Itft, oi Wtst VirfiiiM, iMndi Lon Sob«l of Tomplt University, • face fullof Icsthcr in thtir recent boot el Temple's Mitten Hell. Lou soon ceme into hit ownind seined e decittOA over his teller opponent Coiie9««tc Oia«tt psoto by Eifom' ‘^•Wt ttk.' ^<>»nteredobeyNational College NewsPici44A* a*ui Pa^KUfAofdtWkoro a Stronf Braath Counts — Against You!Newest aese to hit southern campuses is whiffle bell. Here students ofBirminshem’Southem College indulM in a game on the campus. The3sme it played on a ping-pong table, using a ping-pong ball, the ideabeing to blow the ball cross-court off tfie table. Coiumbi* NcwiobotoTakinf One to Givo TwoBill Morgan, Itft, oi Wtst VirfiiiM, iMndi Lon Sob«l of Tomplt University, • face fullof Icsthcr in thtir recent boot el Temple's Mitten Hell. Lou soon ceme into hit ownind seined e decittOA over his teller opponent Coiie9««tc Oia«tt psoto by Eifom' ‘^•Wt ttk.' ^<>»nteredobeyNational College NewsPici44A* a*ui Pa^KUfAofdtWkoro a Stronf Braath Counts — Against You!Newest aese to hit southern campuses is whiffle bell. Here students ofBirminshem’Southem College indulM in a game on the campus. The3sme it played on a ping-pong table, using a ping-pong ball, the ideabeing to blow the ball cross-court off tfie table. Coiumbi* NcwiobotoSoulli Americans Arrive lor **Summer Sckool**Tk* P«n<Am«ric«n Good Noishbor program w«f oivon « ftrong boost when aSroup of 110 •diicaton, studonts and profatsionai man and woman arrived atthe Univartity of North Carolina to attand a tix-waakt “tummar school". Theyara baina axchangad foe Unitad Slatas studanis and profasson who studied inat Linm, Peru, last yaar. Tha chap at laft cama drassad for a haat wave.Rule Over Winter CernivelKins John Marrill and Quaan Biaibara Walcafialdara picturad in thair royal ragalia just before thathraa>day Winter Carnival opened on the St. Law¬rence University campus.World BuilderThis hufa floba, laraast in ciass-lar^troom use in the world, was builtby Dr. O.D. Wallace of WoffordCollasa for use in his work at theSouth Carolina school. Dr. Wal¬lace is one of tha country's out¬standing historians, having writ¬ten the only compiata history ofthis southern state.Collcsuu Dtgcit Photo by KnifhtRouge is the RuseNo longer is it difficult for theOhio Wesleyan publicity officeto gat the most reticent profassotto talk — not with Ruth brusmar,beautiful senior co-ad and newly-appointed interviewer, on theinhilr^ia^ee DKasa hw hA^urtKaENTER COLLEGIATEDIGEST'S PHOTOSALON CONTESTDuring recant air manauvais overtha New England states, studanto ofTrinity Collage manned tha onlyobservation post in Hartford, Conn.High up in tha carillon tower ofthair million-dollar chapel, shifts ofvolunteers spotted "invader"planes, reported them to army haad-auarters by special wire, where aleoretical defense was mappedOUL Collcsi«(< Dls«*t Photo* by L«dnerJohn Butler/ Jr., searches the skies fortraces of "enemy" planes.The boys scurry for the phone whenone nears the city.Harry Jarrett stands prepared. Eyeswere glued to the sky from 6 A. M.to 11 P. M.Soulli Americans Arrive lor **Summer Sckool**Tk* P«n<Am«ric«n Good Noishbor program w«f oivon « ftrong boost when aSroup of 110 •diicaton, studonts and profatsionai man and woman arrived atthe Univartity of North Carolina to attand a tix-waakt “tummar school". Theyara baina axchangad foe Unitad Slatas studanis and profasson who studied inat Linm, Peru, last yaar. Tha chap at laft cama drassad for a haat wave.Rule Over Winter CernivelKins John Marrill and Quaan Biaibara Walcafialdara picturad in thair royal ragalia just before thathraa>day Winter Carnival opened on the St. Law¬rence University campus.World BuilderThis hufa floba, laraast in ciass-lar^troom use in the world, was builtby Dr. O.D. Wallace of WoffordCollasa for use in his work at theSouth Carolina school. Dr. Wal¬lace is one of tha country's out¬standing historians, having writ¬ten the only compiata history ofthis southern state.Collcsuu Dtgcit Photo by KnifhtRouge is the RuseNo longer is it difficult for theOhio Wesleyan publicity officeto gat the most reticent profassotto talk — not with Ruth brusmar,beautiful senior co-ad and newly-appointed interviewer, on theinhilr^ia^ee DKasa hw hA^urtKaENTER COLLEGIATEDIGEST'S PHOTOSALON CONTESTDuring recant air manauvais overtha New England states, studanto ofTrinity Collage manned tha onlyobservation post in Hartford, Conn.High up in tha carillon tower ofthair million-dollar chapel, shifts ofvolunteers spotted "invader"planes, reported them to army haad-auarters by special wire, where aleoretical defense was mappedOUL Collcsi«(< Dls«*t Photo* by L«dnerJohn Butler/ Jr., searches the skies fortraces of "enemy" planes.The boys scurry for the phone whenone nears the city.Harry Jarrett stands prepared. Eyeswere glued to the sky from 6 A. M.to 11 P. M.Starred WithBroken NeckMerton Wisler, College ofEnm orie (Kentet) junior,uilfered injuriet October3 in e lootbell geme endwet l•y*d up for fiveweeks. Pronounced cured,ke returned to the lineupend pleyed in three moregemes before the leetonended. A leter checkupreveeled e crecked verte>bree in hit neck end Wit>ler now hes to weer thiscoller until hit neck heels.Enrich Our CultureThis group of refugeetcholert, which includesmeny of Europe's most dis¬tinguished sevents, soonwill beein lecturing et thenew School for Sociel Re-seerch in New york.THE SMOKE OF SLOWER-BURNING CAMELS GIVES YOUMILDNESS, EXTRA COOLNESS, EXTRA FLAVORy..f!aANDLESSNICOTINEthan the average of the 4 other largest-sellingcigarettes tested—less than any of them—accordingto independent scientific tests of the smoke itselfFive of the largest-selling cigarettes ... the brands that mostof you probably smoke right now...were analyzed and com¬pared by tests of the smoke itself. For, after all, it’s what you’get in the smoke that interests you ... the smoke’s the thing.Over and again the smoke of the slower-burning brand—Camel—was found to contain less nicotine.Dealers everywhere feature Camels by the carton. For con¬venience—for economy—get your Camels by the carton.R. J. Bemoldi Tobtreo Company, Winston-Salem, North CarolinaAMERICA'S No. I SKIERDICK DURRANCE VS.THE STOP-WATCHAT SUN VALLEYHe’s a little man to look at—but on a pair of “hick-ones” he’s a mighty giant.He’s held virtually everymajor down-hill andslalom title in NorthAmerica. He smokes . . .as much as he likes... butnote: He smokes theslower-burning cigarettethat gives extra mildnessand less nicotine in thesmoke... Camel.AT THE ROUNDHOUSE high up on SunValley’s famous Baldy Mountain, Eh'ck Dur-rance (above) takes time out for another Camel.“That Camel flavor is something special,” hesays. “Never wears out its welcome.”And the answer is Camel’s costlier tobaccosin a matchless blend—they’re slower-burning!Try the slower-burning cigarette yourself.Know the supreme pleasure of a smoke freefrom the excess heat and irritating qualities oftoo-fast burning . . . extra cool, extra mild.Enjoy every flavorful puff with the comfort¬ing assurance of science that in Camels you’regetting less nicotine in the smoke (above, right).BY BURNING 25% SLOWER than the average of the 4 other largest-•clUng branda teeted—sIowm' than any of them—Camels also give you asmoking x>lus equal, on tha average, to 5 EXTRA SMOKES PER PACK I/ IT5 SWEa TO \GET THAT EXTRAMIIONESS IN A SMOKEAS TASry AS A CAMEL.THERE'S NOTHING UKE ACAMEL FOR PUVORTHESMOKE’STHETHING!Starred WithBroken NeckMerton Wisler, College ofEnm orie (Kentet) junior,uilfered injuriet October3 in e lootbell geme endwet l•y*d up for fiveweeks. Pronounced cured,ke returned to the lineupend pleyed in three moregemes before the leetonended. A leter checkupreveeled e crecked verte>bree in hit neck end Wit>ler now hes to weer thiscoller until hit neck heels.Enrich Our CultureThis group of refugeetcholert, which includesmeny of Europe's most dis¬tinguished sevents, soonwill beein lecturing et thenew School for Sociel Re-seerch in New york.THE SMOKE OF SLOWER-BURNING CAMELS GIVES YOUMILDNESS, EXTRA COOLNESS, EXTRA FLAVORy..f!aANDLESSNICOTINEthan the average of the 4 other largest-sellingcigarettes tested—less than any of them—accordingto independent scientific tests of the smoke itselfFive of the largest-selling cigarettes ... the brands that mostof you probably smoke right now...were analyzed and com¬pared by tests of the smoke itself. For, after all, it’s what you’get in the smoke that interests you ... the smoke’s the thing.Over and again the smoke of the slower-burning brand—Camel—was found to contain less nicotine.Dealers everywhere feature Camels by the carton. For con¬venience—for economy—get your Camels by the carton.R. J. Bemoldi Tobtreo Company, Winston-Salem, North CarolinaAMERICA'S No. I SKIERDICK DURRANCE VS.THE STOP-WATCHAT SUN VALLEYHe’s a little man to look at—but on a pair of “hick-ones” he’s a mighty giant.He’s held virtually everymajor down-hill andslalom title in NorthAmerica. He smokes . . .as much as he likes... butnote: He smokes theslower-burning cigarettethat gives extra mildnessand less nicotine in thesmoke... Camel.AT THE ROUNDHOUSE high up on SunValley’s famous Baldy Mountain, Eh'ck Dur-rance (above) takes time out for another Camel.“That Camel flavor is something special,” hesays. “Never wears out its welcome.”And the answer is Camel’s costlier tobaccosin a matchless blend—they’re slower-burning!Try the slower-burning cigarette yourself.Know the supreme pleasure of a smoke freefrom the excess heat and irritating qualities oftoo-fast burning . . . extra cool, extra mild.Enjoy every flavorful puff with the comfort¬ing assurance of science that in Camels you’regetting less nicotine in the smoke (above, right).BY BURNING 25% SLOWER than the average of the 4 other largest-•clUng branda teeted—sIowm' than any of them—Camels also give you asmoking x>lus equal, on tha average, to 5 EXTRA SMOKES PER PACK I/ IT5 SWEa TO \GET THAT EXTRAMIIONESS IN A SMOKEAS TASry AS A CAMEL.THERE'S NOTHING UKE ACAMEL FOR PUVORTHESMOKE’STHETHING!These 'Oldies' Worked inOetpH* conitent ettempts to•ft oF "cribbing" durino exaicentoge oF colTegions. It dottktse ottempts at cheating, ydente every year. These newthe scholastic tageard, oftening a "system" than it woul<material. Collegiate DigestoF pictures revealing the iengsmueele "cribs" into the da*the University oF Iowa csmpiCoilfsThis mechanical genius has removed the center portion oF his rubber heel to create a pair oF special "exam" shoes.Having driven a long nail through each end oF the opening, and roiled his notes around the nails, he need only turnthe head of one oF the nails to get the information which should be in his head.Loose-topped rubber boots have become campus Fashion For present day co-eds. They have also becomea convenient asset to the co-ed who wants to "crib" her way through examinations. Notes are attachedto the inside oF the boot with cellophane tape to be referred to whenever the opportunity presents itself.IF you'd like to get caught sneaking answers, try writing theegot wise to thb obsolete method years ago.These 'Oldies' Worked inOetpH* conitent ettempts to•ft oF "cribbing" durino exaicentoge oF colTegions. It dottktse ottempts at cheating, ydente every year. These newthe scholastic tageard, oftening a "system" than it woul<material. Collegiate DigestoF pictures revealing the iengsmueele "cribs" into the da*the University oF Iowa csmpiCoilfsThis mechanical genius has removed the center portion oF his rubber heel to create a pair oF special "exam" shoes.Having driven a long nail through each end oF the opening, and roiled his notes around the nails, he need only turnthe head of one oF the nails to get the information which should be in his head.Loose-topped rubber boots have become campus Fashion For present day co-eds. They have also becomea convenient asset to the co-ed who wants to "crib" her way through examinations. Notes are attachedto the inside oF the boot with cellophane tape to be referred to whenever the opportunity presents itself.IF you'd like to get caught sneaking answers, try writing theegot wise to thb obsolete method years ago.III is used by • *m«n ptr-rofesiors Ions to dlicovof, are worked out by $tu-out all ol the ingenuity in10 spend more time devis-[t a firm ©*• the testis page an exclusive seriesI some studento will go to« oictures were posed onGo«ib<f9The minieture cemere fen hes devised e new trick. He cen take pictures of three full type¬written pages and make contact prints that arc easily concealed in the palm of the hand,written pages and make contact prints tyet sharp enough to be readily legible.Giant'Sised dinner rings neatly conceal important notes. Because of the limitedsite, this method is not satidactory to the "all out" cribber.930’sTeachers Hiding "cribs" about the room is a dangerous andshopworn idea. Better memorixe it instead. .Watchful teachers are aware of the old necktieand purse gags.Home-made scrolls are clumsy to handle and eas¬ily delected.III is used by • *m«n ptr-rofesiors Ions to dlicovof, are worked out by $tu-out all ol the ingenuity in10 spend more time devis-[t a firm ©*• the testis page an exclusive seriesI some studento will go to« oictures were posed onGo«ib<f9The minieture cemere fen hes devised e new trick. He cen take pictures of three full type¬written pages and make contact prints that arc easily concealed in the palm of the hand,written pages and make contact prints tyet sharp enough to be readily legible.Giant'Sised dinner rings neatly conceal important notes. Because of the limitedsite, this method is not satidactory to the "all out" cribber.930’sTeachers Hiding "cribs" about the room is a dangerous andshopworn idea. Better memorixe it instead. .Watchful teachers are aware of the old necktieand purse gags.Home-made scrolls are clumsy to handle and eas¬ily delected.Kenny Cein won't drop these cup-cakes. He iced them himself as a partof his job of livins at the cooperative lodge. He's on table duty this week.“I’d rather have boys help me than girls", saysMrs. A. A. McDonald, house-supervisor.She's showing Al Laing how to cut cheese here.Putting a pillow into a slip is a two-man jolfor James Fife and footimll letterman JacIHill.Fifty-three Westminster College men are cutting a third off their year'sliving expenses by doing their own housekeeping and cooking in the newJeffers cooperative dormitory for men. Assignments are divided into fourclassifications: "•^ist cooks", “wait^on tables" "wash dishes", (that's thetough onel), and "sweep up halls". Each collegian is require to workone hour a day at one job for ten days, then shift to another type of work.The new $35,000 dormitory is in charge of a house-supervisor whosays she gives her boys an added degree each year to the ones they regu¬larly receive — a Bachelor of Housekeeping. Jeffers Hall is the gift of thelate John S. Mack whose hobby was to aid deserving young men to gothrough college on limited finances.It's a^ long way down to the ground for tallJim Bennett, whose job for this particularweek is sweeping the snow off the walks.Setting the table is done in the best Emily Pofashion. Here George Campbell puts pUtes otke table while Alan Orvis pours water.Leering it Ike Finish LineFor acute expression of competition, look at the faces of Bob Webster and Bob McCarthyas they lunge at the tape in the time trials of the Michigan State College track team. Theypot forth every ounce of energy to be tbe first to breek tim tape. D.9est psow by PreWeHc'f a Coaches* CoachPaul D. "Tony" Hinkle, coach and athletic director at Butler University,ceives a fram^ scroll, commemorating his SO years of service at Butier, nBerkeley W. Duck, Jr., president of the Indianapolis Junior Chamber of Omerce. Coaches doKribe Hinkle as one of the outstanding members of ^profemion.Kenny Cein won't drop these cup-cakes. He iced them himself as a partof his job of livins at the cooperative lodge. He's on table duty this week.“I’d rather have boys help me than girls", saysMrs. A. A. McDonald, house-supervisor.She's showing Al Laing how to cut cheese here.Putting a pillow into a slip is a two-man jolfor James Fife and footimll letterman JacIHill.Fifty-three Westminster College men are cutting a third off their year'sliving expenses by doing their own housekeeping and cooking in the newJeffers cooperative dormitory for men. Assignments are divided into fourclassifications: "•^ist cooks", “wait^on tables" "wash dishes", (that's thetough onel), and "sweep up halls". Each collegian is require to workone hour a day at one job for ten days, then shift to another type of work.The new $35,000 dormitory is in charge of a house-supervisor whosays she gives her boys an added degree each year to the ones they regu¬larly receive — a Bachelor of Housekeeping. Jeffers Hall is the gift of thelate John S. Mack whose hobby was to aid deserving young men to gothrough college on limited finances.It's a^ long way down to the ground for tallJim Bennett, whose job for this particularweek is sweeping the snow off the walks.Setting the table is done in the best Emily Pofashion. Here George Campbell puts pUtes otke table while Alan Orvis pours water.Leering it Ike Finish LineFor acute expression of competition, look at the faces of Bob Webster and Bob McCarthyas they lunge at the tape in the time trials of the Michigan State College track team. Theypot forth every ounce of energy to be tbe first to breek tim tape. D.9est psow by PreWeHc'f a Coaches* CoachPaul D. "Tony" Hinkle, coach and athletic director at Butler University,ceives a fram^ scroll, commemorating his SO years of service at Butier, nBerkeley W. Duck, Jr., president of the Indianapolis Junior Chamber of Omerce. Coaches doKribe Hinkle as one of the outstanding members of ^profemion.Expr€tt€t Hop# ol Enflifh VictoryHis Imperial HisKncu Archduke Otto of Austria, center,icir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, chab with studenbind faculty of Drexel Institute of Tecnnoloey, after he de-bvcrcd a lecture on the "European Oudook". He likeneddictatorship to a bicycle, "you can ride on it but you can'tstand up on it."HonorodPtof. Frank W. Nkoison ofWesleyan University was re¬cently presented wiUi a silverplecque in recognition of his30 years of service as an of-of the National Col¬legiate Athletic Association.Exanrif Arc Tough in More Ways Than OneAccording to a rule fixed by Alpha Xi Deltas at Stebon University,pledges can't date during exam weeks. Pi Kappa Phi pledge Max Stamperis perplexed, but Pat Sweet seems reconciled. Ruth Hillman, right, isn'tquite as happy, but maybe that's because Maxie's her steady. TheurerFans For a Fan DancerBeta Chi, professional business fraternity at the Uni-ariity of Minnesota, invited famed Sally Rand to speak atjeir banouet, so Sally wowed them with a talk on "Thealue of White Space in Advertising"!CollcsKtc Digcit PKoio bv GoldsteinG3le6icdeDi6estSoettenOUiM: StS ra«4iMNATIONAL AOVCariSINGStavicc INC4t0 MeUlson Avmm, Now VwIi400 N«. MicNf w A«««hm, CNc«teBmIm Sm Fsomcnco Lm Aiif«i«s900 Men and a GirlPretty Betty Beabon of the Col¬lege of St. Catherine in SaintPaul was chosen to rule overneighboring College of St.Thomas' Mid-Winter Frolic.Here she is surrounded with maleautograph seekers when shemade her first appearance on theSt. Thomas campus. D«iyExpr€tt€t Hop# ol Enflifh VictoryHis Imperial HisKncu Archduke Otto of Austria, center,icir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, chab with studenbind faculty of Drexel Institute of Tecnnoloey, after he de-bvcrcd a lecture on the "European Oudook". He likeneddictatorship to a bicycle, "you can ride on it but you can'tstand up on it."HonorodPtof. Frank W. Nkoison ofWesleyan University was re¬cently presented wiUi a silverplecque in recognition of his30 years of service as an of-of the National Col¬legiate Athletic Association.Exanrif Arc Tough in More Ways Than OneAccording to a rule fixed by Alpha Xi Deltas at Stebon University,pledges can't date during exam weeks. Pi Kappa Phi pledge Max Stamperis perplexed, but Pat Sweet seems reconciled. Ruth Hillman, right, isn'tquite as happy, but maybe that's because Maxie's her steady. TheurerFans For a Fan DancerBeta Chi, professional business fraternity at the Uni-ariity of Minnesota, invited famed Sally Rand to speak atjeir banouet, so Sally wowed them with a talk on "Thealue of White Space in Advertising"!CollcsKtc Digcit PKoio bv GoldsteinG3le6icdeDi6estSoettenOUiM: StS ra«4iMNATIONAL AOVCariSINGStavicc INC4t0 MeUlson Avmm, Now VwIi400 N«. MicNf w A«««hm, CNc«teBmIm Sm Fsomcnco Lm Aiif«i«s900 Men and a GirlPretty Betty Beabon of the Col¬lege of St. Catherine in SaintPaul was chosen to rule overneighboring College of St.Thomas' Mid-Winter Frolic.Here she is surrounded with maleautograph seekers when shemade her first appearance on theSt. Thomas campus. D«iyHe Earns As He LearnsJames Secrest, talented young sophomore of Bell State Teachers College, supplies art obiects toschools for the benefit of visual education. As an employee of the Teaching Material Service ofthe college, much of his work goes to the instructors asking for materials to aid them in teachingthe lower grades. ^Coll<9i«<e Diftit Photo "by MinorBaauty, Net Badminton. . . won for pretty Rachel Reber the title of "most typical" UmveniWichita freshman girl. She is 64V^ inches tali, weighs 118V2 poundscomes nearest being the average frosh co^ed.Uftf Nature*! Air.Conditioninftunnel as a "curing cave". Dr. P. G. Miller of Ciemson' ^«nufacture of blue vein cheese, the Ameri-*- ®«auefort. Here Dr. Miller is per-•«auired to cure theAdapting an old mountain tunnel a» •College has started the experimental manufacture v. .can cQuivalent of the now unobtainable French Ro<)uefort. Hereformins an acid test on the hrst vat of milk. Six months will be requireh'rst test. CoiThat BIG Moment. . . arrived for Pledge Bud Toxer recently when he receivedDeke pin from House President Don Wilson. Toxer was chosenmost typical and photogenic fraternity pledge by student eat the University of Chicago. D'**’'He Earns As He LearnsJames Secrest, talented young sophomore of Bell State Teachers College, supplies art obiects toschools for the benefit of visual education. As an employee of the Teaching Material Service ofthe college, much of his work goes to the instructors asking for materials to aid them in teachingthe lower grades. ^Coll<9i«<e Diftit Photo "by MinorBaauty, Net Badminton. . . won for pretty Rachel Reber the title of "most typical" UmveniWichita freshman girl. She is 64V^ inches tali, weighs 118V2 poundscomes nearest being the average frosh co^ed.Uftf Nature*! Air.Conditioninftunnel as a "curing cave". Dr. P. G. Miller of Ciemson' ^«nufacture of blue vein cheese, the Ameri-*- ®«auefort. Here Dr. Miller is per-•«auired to cure theAdapting an old mountain tunnel a» •College has started the experimental manufacture v. .can cQuivalent of the now unobtainable French Ro<)uefort. Hereformins an acid test on the hrst vat of milk. Six months will be requireh'rst test. CoiThat BIG Moment. . . arrived for Pledge Bud Toxer recently when he receivedDeke pin from House President Don Wilson. Toxer was chosenmost typical and photogenic fraternity pledge by student eat the University of Chicago. D'**’'