jVol. 34. No. 55.UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, FRIDAY. JANUARYWhat of ItBy SIDNEY HYMAN-variations on a themeI jiroposed to use a passage fromihf Book of Numbers as a text fortoday’s sermon, but, unfortunately,tlu'ie were no telephone directoriesat hand, (laughter) so I had to con-ti'iit myself with a pa.ssajre from\lllOS.And the Lord said to Amos, “Gounto the clubwomen of the I’niver-sity of Chicago and say unto them,'i ou have amused me with your pre-ten.'os. You have painted your lips,blanched your cheeks, and pluckedyour eyebrows, and the few remain-inp hairs you have soused with mas¬cara. Your eyes have rings underthem large enough to stage a Bar-num and Bailey Circus. You havewrapped the nakedness of your abil-itie> with the corners of your clubpin.>^. and you arc content that your>hame is secure from sight. (Loud ap-j)lause). Though I was tired fromclnukling. I did not restrain you, forIt was for the purpose of amusingme, that I brought you forth out ofthe land of oblivion.“But now that you have takenunto yourselves new pledges. I warnyou not to teach them the art of be¬ing mysterious about things obviousthat they may be more seductive. Iwarn you that you do not teachthem the tricks of a Houdini in the.ability to create something out ofnothing. ... in the instance of thepledges, the art of creating conver¬sation out of hot air. I warn you ofthis, le.st my amusement with humanfoibles grow so great that I die ofpleasure.” .And Amos said. “O, K.,God.” and went his way.And Amos, who had never heardof clubs before, went to seek whatthey were before he could talk ofthem. And so he asked .'>,000 peopleat the University of Chicago whattheir reactions were to women’sclubs. “Clubs? Clubs?” they asked.“.Never lead with a club,” they re¬plied. Then they laughed in theirhandkerchiefs. It was an old gag oftheirs. (F’rolonged laughter. 1 Then.Amos .‘saw that clubs had so concen¬trated themselves, that, whereasmany personalities existed at onetime, now only one entity existed..Xnd the one had so concentrated it¬self that it bordered on non-exi.st-ence. That is why no one knew oftheir existence. (Cries of Bravo!)Then did .Amos see that he couldnot learn of clubs hy asking .students iabout them, because most studentswent about their work unconsciousof the existence of such in.-titutions. !So .Amos determined to go to rockbottom and seek out the clubs, thathe might address them with the wordsof the Lord. So he went to the Cof- Ifeee Shoppee, the “C” bench, andthe lounge of Ida Noyes Hall.It was as though he were in a cave |of winds. The blasts in the.se jilaceswere maddening. But it was impos¬sible to determine which club emit- ;ted the hollowest blasts. Again he ,could not separate the clubs that he |might lecture them about their hum¬orous antics. As there are no dif¬ferences betw’een protoplasms of hu¬man beings, so are clubs, which, forthe purposes of this discussion, may jbe said to be human beings, are nototherwise. For all clubs are made upof firotoplasm.“Now the word of the Lord weigh¬ed heavy with .Amos. God told himto warn the clubs from being tooamusing a spectacle. But Amoslearned only by rumor that they ex-i.sted, and knowing that many a hap¬py household was broken up due toan idle roomer, (sustained applause)Amos waxed hot with anger insteadof with amusement, and for this hesinned against God.And Amos started fighting theclubs, but fighting the clubs was likefighting a shadow*; it tires the boxerwithout affecting the shadow. Amosdied of exhaustion and above histomb there was erected a monumentupon which was inscribed, HOMOSAPIENS DEMENTIUM E PLURI-BUS UNUM.Indeed my flock, Amos could notfind the clubs, for clubs are a stateof mind. They are predicated on theassumption that other people willfeel badly about not being a memberof the particular group. They aremagnified calling cards irf the busi¬ness of eliciting deference from theproletariat, and in-so-far as they sosucceed, they reflect on the sadstate of intelligence of those who paythem court. In a word they areharmless institutions and should beeficouraged by proper symbols. PageMr. Sc human.PICK SOUTH SHORECOUNTRY CLUB FORANNUAIJORMftLAnnounce Orchestra forWashington PromNext WeekThe Washington Prom will be held ,at the South Shore Country Club, jaccording to an announcement made iyesterday by Evelyn Carr, chairman 'of the committee on arrangements jfor the dance. The Prom will be held 'on February 21, the eve of Washing- .ton’s birthday, as it has been for thepast twenty-nine years.The orchestra for the dance w'illbe announced sometime next week, assoon as final arrangements havebeen made and contracts have beensigned. Negotiations are being car¬ried on with Clyde McCoy, Tom Gen- ,! try, Mark Fisher and Charlie Agnew, Iand it is expected that one of thesebands will play. According to pres- .ent plans, two orchestras will be , .hired, in order that continuous musicmay be supplied during the evening.Scene of Social Affair*The South Shore Country Club has ,been the scene of many of major !University social events for over adecade. One of the three majordances last year, the Military Ball,given in the spring quarter, was heldthere. Since the Washington Promusually attracts the largest crowds of :the season, the South Shore Country IClub was chosen in preference to iprivate rooms in downtown hotels, |where, it was feared, seating capac¬ity would not be sufficient.The price of bids for the affair :will be $5, and will include a mid¬night supper. Tickets will be placedon sale within the next ten days, andfraternity and dormitory representa¬tives will be appointed at that time ito sell them. Each salesman who sells ’ten bids for the dance w'ill be givena complimentary ticket. Provisionsare being made for approximately700 people.Salesmen WantedAny man wishing to sell bids forthe Prom is asked to report to Her¬man Odell, chairman of the ticketsales committee, within the nextweek, in order that preference maybe given to salesmen anxious to workon the dance. The freshman council ;will be asked to ajijicint four .sales¬men to represent that class in ticket.‘<all‘ distribution.The Prom la.st year was held at :Lhe Congress hotel. Hal Kemp fur¬nished the music. 1Renowned AviatorRecalls AdventuresBRITISH AIRMA^OEPICTS EVERESTFLIGHT TONIGHTdimont SciNew Grid AssP. F. M. Fcillowes Speaks pin Fourth of StudentLecture SeriesNotre Dame Starto Aid ShaughnessyAir-Commander FellowesMAROON ENDS FIRSTPART OF SURVEY ONSTATUS OF GRADESHalf of Freshman andSophomore ClassesState OpinionDr. Mather, Explorerand Geologist, Talksat Chapel ServicesKirtley Matlier, jirofessor of Geo¬logy at Harvard university, will bethe speaker^ at the I’niversity chapelservice Sunday .-it 11.Professor Mather has been chair¬man of the department of Geologyand Geography at Harvard since1925. Since 1919, he has been geo¬logist of the United States Geologi¬cal Survey, and he conducted explora¬tion in eastern Bolivia in 1919 and1920. Professor Mather is chairmanof the editorial board of the Scien¬tific Book Club, and a fellow of theGeological Society of America, TheAmerican Academy of Arts and Sci¬ences, and the Engineering-EconomicFoundation. !Some of the books Professor Math- ier has written are “Fauna of the jMorrow Formation,” “Old Mother jF<?arth,’' and “Science in Search of iGod.” He is also contributing editorto World Unity magazine and haswritten government bulletins andpopular articles for the Forum andAtlantic Monthly.Professor Mather is interested intracing the relations between scienceand religion. His book, “Science inSearch of God,” is recognized as acontribution to this field.'I'he first part of The Daily Ma¬roon’s grade questionnaire projectends today. At this time it seemsthat over half of the freshman andsophomores will have expressed anopinion.The la.st chance for these twocla.sses to vote will be provided atthe entrance to the Cobb Hall Col¬lege library this afteinoon between2:30 and 4:30. It is hoped that allthose who have not voted will makean effort to do so today.Next week those who have qualifiedfor their college certificates underthe new plan will be reached by mail.A questionnaire which may be re- jturned to The Daily .Maroon through \the faculty exchange, will be sent to ,each one. iTabulate Results |The result.^ of the questionnaire ,will be tabulated by members of The iDaily Maroon staff under the direc- |tion of William Reitz, assistant to jthe Dean of Students, who assisted 'the Maroon in preparing the ques- ;tionnaire. When the returns are in. jthe comjilete figures will be releas- ied, with an analysis of the study andhow* it was set up, published in full. iThis report will be sent to President |Hutchins for consideration. Thus !The Daily Maroon feels that it will !have made a significant contribution Ito the workings of the new plan.Besides the specific questions onthe grade system, the students havebeen asked for comments on variousphases of the new* plan. Actuallythese remarks will have no bearing ina survey of this sort.Commander P. F. M. Fellowes,British airman, will speak on “TheConquest of Mt. Everest” in thefourth of the Student Lecture seriesthis evening in Mandel hall at 8:30.Motion pictures of Fellowes’ astound¬ing flight over the crest of the world’shighest mountain w*ill accompany hislecture.The celebrated British air leaderhas had a life full of adventure.While his Mt. Everest flight rateshigh among scientific achievements,Fellowes’ other acts of daring havefrequently placed him on the frontnews pages. In April, 1918, after theBritish Navy had failed to block thesubmarine base of Zeebrugge, Fel¬lowes and his famous Squadron 202undertook the job. Facing almostcertain death, Fellowes dropped inhis plane to a bare 50 feet to bombthe locks and imprison the Germansubmarine fleet.Held Prisoner in WarAfter he had successfully stoppedthe German submarine attack, Fel¬lowes was shot down and held pris¬oner. Since the war Fellowes hascommanded two air expeditions toConstantinople and recently surveyedthe Cairo-Bagdad air route.Anticipating the many difficultiesto be encountered in the Houston-Mt. Everest flight, the backers of theflight persuaded the British air min¬istry to appoint Fellow’es Commander.Photographs taken during his 34,-500 foot climb over the crest of Ev¬erest have answered many questionsabout the hitherto unknown glaciers,unconquerable except by air.Epic FlightAt his highest altitude, whichcleared the historic mountain by ascant 100 feet, Fellowes battled a110-mile an hour gale, at a tempera¬ture of 76 degrees below zero. Allequipment used on the actual flighthad to be heated and insulated towithstand the temperatures.Tickets for the lecture by Com¬mander Fellowes may be obtained atthe Mandel cloister box office, Wood¬worth’s Bookstore and the Univer- isity Bookstore. Tickets for the lec- Iture by Raymond Moley, interna¬tional economist, on February 6 are |also on sale. Main floor seats are 55 icents and 85 cents. Balcony seats are j55 cents.Former IrishWill Begin Vin SpringMarchmont SchwartzGIANNINI, AMERICANSOPRANO, PRESENTSCONCERT TUESDAYAppears in Recital Given byUniversity OrchestralAssociationFifty-Six Students,Faculty Leave forDruce Lake MeetingGERMANY PREPARESFOR WAR, SCHUMANTELLS N. S. L. GROUPOPEN HOUSE TONIGHTA second open house is being spon¬sored by the Ida Noyes AdvisoryCouncil tonight from 8 to 12. All thefacilities of Ida Noyes hall will be“There are no grounds for thesupposition that Germany is not pre¬paring for war,” stated Dr. FredericL. Schuman, assistant professor ofPolitical Science, at the tea given yes¬terday afternoon in his honor at IdaNoyes hall by the National StudentI./eague.In his discussion of his recent tripto Russia and Germany, he addedthat “Hitlerism represents the mob¬ilization and deflection of resentmenttowards big business and labor lead¬ership to the conviction that thesenatural enemies are actually underthe control of the Jews, who are con¬spiring to rule the world. While un¬der delusion control of propagandawas achieved, so even if bourgeoisiebecome undeceived there is no chancefor them to regain power.”“The main difficulties in the FiveYear Plan of Russia as I see them,”Dr. Schuman said, “are bureaucracy,demoralization, stupidity of the peas¬antry, and increased differences be-Names of tliose who are taking theannual Druce lake trip Saturdaywere announced yestei'day by RobertWalker. Those who will attend areDr. Melville Herskovits, Mrs. HenryWieman, Arthur Holt, Dr. HenryHoughton, Eugene Staley, Mary Gil¬son, Jerome Kerwin.Aaron Brumbaugh, Mollie Carroll,Forrest Kingsbury, Arthur Scott,Charles Gilkey, Mrs. Harvey Carr,Clarence Cade, Preston Cutler, |Beatrice Achtenberg, Elma Stauffer, |Connie Fish, Ruth Pier, Ray Rock- iwood, Sidney Hyman, Alvin Pitcher, iPhyllis Green, liouise Craver, Mad-!eline Strong, Helen de Wei’thenn, jBettyann Nelson, Mary Antonie,!Lily David, Lewis Dexter, LynnStiles, Marie Berger, Allis Graham,Rae Rips. jHildegard von Poven, Throop jVaughn, Margai'et Clark, Warren iThompson, Theodore Noss, Jack Me- jLanahan, William Minor, SewardHiltner, Anna Martin Findlay, Mrs.Noble, Geraldine Smithwick, JamesMcDevitt, Mary Walter, , LeonardNathan, Jack Allan, Merle Giles,Blanche Kleinman, Charles McCoy,John Barden, Curtis Plopper, LillianSchoen, and Robert Walker.The American soprano, DusolinaGiannini, will present a concert underthe auspices of the University Or¬chestral a.'isociation Tuesday eveningat 8:30 in Mandel hall. Tickets forthe event are now on sale from 1 to4 at the office of the association inCobb 202. They are priced at $1,$1.25, and $1.50. Student tickets forthe series of Chicago Symphony cam¬pus concerts will admit the ownersto the concert.Madame Giannini is a Europeanfavorite, for she has made five toursof the continent, appearing in recital,in opera, and with sjiiiphony orches¬tras. She has appeared with practi¬cally every major orchestra in thiscountry.Subs for Claire Dupe jThe singer was born in Philadel¬phia of Italian parents. She received |all of her musical education in this ,country, preceding the New York de- jbut which brought her sudden fame.Her first musical studies were under !the tutelage of her father, who hadbeen a well-known tenor and hadsung in opera with Adelina Patti.I..ater she went to New York tocontinue her studies with Mme. Mar¬cella Sembrich. Four years later shereceived the opportunity of substi¬tuting for an indisposed singer, andthis debut marked her first musicaltriumph.Madame Giannini is appearing inthe place of Claire Dux, formerlyscheduled for the Tuesday eveningconcert, since Miss Dux has cancell¬ed all engagements for the season.I Marchmont Schwaitz, Notrej Dame’s All-America half-back, wasi appointed an assistant football coachyesterday by Clark D. Shaughnessy,head of the Maroon coaching staff.Schwartz, backfield coach at NotreDame under Hartley .Anderson, sincethe spring of 1932, will start workon the Midway in March, when springpractice for the football season be-J?ins.Shaughnessy and Schwartz havebeen friends for many years, sincethe days that the Notre Dame starwas a high-school athlete at St, Stan¬islaus, Bay St. Louis, near New Or¬leans, where Shaughnessy was coach-ing at Loyola. “Marchie” was onShaughnessy’s freshman team in 1927but left Loyola to go to Notre Dame,where he won national fame.Trip(e-Threat ManSchwartz played football at NotreDame in 1929, 1930, and 1931, hisposition being that of left half, the“triple threat” position of the Rock-ne system. In his junior and senioryears he was an “All-America” halfback. The Notre Dame teams onwhich Schwartz played in 1929 and1930 were undefeated national cham¬pions and it was not until the lasttwo games of his career that he wason a losing team. Southern Cali¬fornia won 16 to 14 with its famousrally, and Army defeated NotreDame the next week 12 to 0. Thoughhe was an all-around athlete in highschool, Schwartz engaged in no othersports at Notre Dame.Works with LopezBut 24 years old, Schwartz is re¬garded as one of the ablest youngcoaches in the country. At Chicago,he and Julian Lopez, backfield coachwhom Shaughnessy brought up fromLoyola, will work with the backs.“1 am very plea,sed that Schwartzis coming here,” Shaughnessy* said inannouncing the appointment. “I haveknown him since he was a boy andhave had the highest regard for him.He will be a big help to the Chicagoteam, for he is one of the best youngcoaches in the business. He knowshow to give players the techniqueand polish that will enable them todo their jobs with precision and ef¬fectiveness.”PLAN INTERNATIONALHOUSE DINNER-DANCEFOR WINTER SEASONMirror InauguratesNew Chorus; HoldsTryouts Next WeekStudents who wish to work onthe production staffs of Mirrorand Playfest are asked to reportto the Tower room in Mitchelltower any afternoon next week.RACKET DISCUSSIONavailable to students for dancing,cards, bowling, and numerous other I tween classes, which seems .strangegames. Refreshments will be served,! in an equalitarian society.Morrison Handsaker, an authorityon the cleaning and dyeing businessin Chicago, will discuss “Racketeer¬ing and the Cleaning Business” to¬day at 4:30 in the Common room ofHaskell hall. The lecture is underthe auspices of the Graduate Econom¬ic and Business Club.International House inauguratesits winter social activities with a din¬ner-dance tomorrow night from 7:30to 1 for members of the House andtheir guests and for students of theUniversity. Harry Berkover’s orches¬tra, which furnished music for theChristmas dance, has been chosen bythe Social Committee to play for thedance.The hostesses for the dinner-danceare Mai'got Boertlein, Ruth Buffing¬ton, Julia Cottrell, Helen Hiett, Vir¬ginia Jeffries, Peggy Marshall, andBeggy Rittenhou.se. The hosts areCharles Frost, Arthur Going, HerbertJerosch, and John Pelzel.Members may secure tickets fromthe cashier for the dinner and dancefor $1.25 each, and for the dance onlyfor 50 cents each. Guests and stu¬dents may purchase tickets for thedinner-dance for $1.50 each and for ithe dance only for 75 cents each.Marking an innovation in its pro¬duction, the Mirror Board yesterdayissued a call for applicants for anew' chorus which w'ill make its firstappearance in the annual productionMarch 2 and 3. Tryouts will be heldin the Ida Noyes Theater Tuesdayand Wednesday afternoons between4:30 and 5:30. Women applying areasked to wear bathing suits and softshoes.The Board has planned the chorusas a departure from foi'mer Mirrordancing. The group will have few¬er members than the ballet, and mem¬bers will be carefully selected witha view to their ability to participatein the specialty numbers which arenow being outlined.-Additions to the production com¬mittees were announced yesterday bythe Board. Betty Patterson has beennamed to assist Evelyn Carr, thestage manager, in directing back-stage production.FRESHMAN MIXERI.arry Smith and his orchestra willfurnish the music for the mixer to beheld Saturday night, in Ida Noyeshall after the Chicago-Michigan bask¬etball game. The mixer is sponsoredby the Freshman Council, and therewill be no admission price. Refresh¬ments will be served.IN ORIGINAL!'\7ON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1934$4.00 by mail. Single cassumed by the University oi Chicagot>earing in The Daily Maroon, or for any,0 bv The Daily Maroon.,c* ’ class matter March !'•, at the post-Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879..daroon expressly reserves all right of publication.al appearing in this paper.BOARD OF CONTROL■N P. BARDEN, Editor-in-Chieft iNCENT NEWMAN, Business ManagerWILLIAM GOODSTEIN, Managing EditorWALTER L. MONTGOMERY, Cir ulationJANE I. BIESENTHAL, Associate Ed’torBETTY HANSEN, Associate EditorTom BartonNoel B. GersonEDITORIAL ASSISTANTSHoward P. Hudson Howard M. RichDavid H. Kutner Florence WishnlckBUSI.NESS ASSISTANTSWilliam Bergman William O’Donnell Robert SamuelsSOPHOMORE REPORTERSCharlotte FishmanRaymond LahrRalph NicholsonEdgar GreenebaumJanet LewyPrussingRuth GreenebaumCurtis MelnickBarker StantonDonald MorrisJeanne StolteHenry KelleyWilliam WatsonSOPHOMORE BUSINESSASSISTANTSZalmon Goldsmith Gerald SternFrank DavisEkiward SchaarEverett StoreyMarie BergerEDITORIAL COMMITTEELouise Craver Preeton CutlerGeoig Mannan* that “pro*..lary training in allmilitary training underat the University of Wis-fding to natural justice, legallligent justice, President Right- [.eg to stand on.k, president of the University of‘ Ls'e says, “There should be some pro¬vision je for the conscientious objector, just asan inti^.igent nation makes in wartime."President Frank’s inference regarding the in¬telligence of Ohio State authorities was apparent.1 he expelled students, of course, have taken arather low advantage of a gorgeous opportunity.As their university administration fumes, news¬paper headlines hlaze. editorial writers scintillate,and socialist-pacifists become feverish in denunica-tion, those students indulge in much secret de¬light, publicly displaj'ed.They are indisputably, unconscionably, unequivocally, intrinsically right.And still the Ohio State Lantern does not knowwhat to do.—J. P. B.and intellectual stamina—both vir¬tues can be developed only throughideas and discussion of them. Anyman who becomes both critical andintellectual by attendance at a fact—dispensary is a genius. . .no less. Andin the education of a genius, nothingmatters much.—ed.Night Editor: Howard M. RichAssistant: Ralph Nicholsonfaculty—areThey willFriday, January 19, 1934A LANTERN THATSHEDS NO LIGHTStriking is the situation where a university ad¬ministration is undeniably wrong and a group ofstudents is undeniably right.Seven Ohio Stat»* students vs. President Right-mire and R. O. T. C. advocates present con¬summate perfection of situation for a studentnewspaper.Yet the poor little Ohio State Lantern does notknow what to do about it.It apologizes for inability to find in any col¬lege paper editorials advocating compulsory mil¬itary training. By a peculiar, amusing process ofreasoning, the Lantern arrives at an utterly ori¬ginal conclusion that compulsory military train¬ing must have some merits, since every collegeeditor is against it.To side with something because every collegeeditor is against it has humorous and reasonableaspects, but the Lantern showed no sign of recog¬nizing such subtlety.And so, after spending the fall in a vicious raidafter the scalp of their football coach. The OhioState Lantern straddled a wobbly fence on thepertinent R. O. T. C. question, raised by sevenstudents who refused to join it.In trying to keep things hot. The Lantern blewluke warm and tepid.The editorial that said the military course wasalmost an extra-curricular activity which shouldbe optional also said that compulsory drill is notanti-social or pro-war.Again, in the same editorial, a statement ap¬peared that optional drill was favored by thepaper simply because it was popular, then pro¬ceeded quite seriously to propose a vote to findout whether it was popular or not.The vote was to include faculty, alumni, trus¬tees, and students. The army was entirely omit¬ted. As a true neutral we suggest that The Lan¬tern let the army vote too. After all this is thearmy’s fight.The Lantern evidently does not think eitherside is right and does not much care. They pro¬pose a vote on the matter, but stated that thereferendum idea was an old one, had been triedbefore, and is guaranteed to have no effect what¬soever.Leaving The Lantern to find its own way outof its Slough of Unoriginality, we will investigatehow President Rightmire wandered into his Mire.To understand the situation, one must realizethat presidents of state universities are forced tospend more time understanding what state legis¬lature want than comprehending the meaning ofeducation, research, and academic freedom.President Rightmire expelled seven of his stu¬dents under the Morill Land Grant Act on thegrounds that the act demanded compulsory mil¬itary training. ^DISCUSSIONSAT DRUCEFifty-six people—student andleaving for Druce Lake tomorrow,spend the week-end in discussion.Fifty-six hundred people will remain on cam- |pus to study for their next examinations if they jare absurdly conscientious. 'Which group will progress furthest in their edu- <cation, if progress for two days could be meas¬ured at all?Those who discuss, we hold. For they exchange ;ideas and like it; while those studying for exam¬inations must memorize facts and don’t like it.—J. P. B.The Travelling BazaarlBY CHARLES (“Scriblerus”) TYROLER IBIOLOGICAL SCIENCE LECTUREAdele Sandman gave us the material for thisitem, but she asked us not to mention her name.So u'e won't. We’ll say that Phil Werner gave usthe stuff. Adele will like that better, and besidesit wouldn’t be right to mention her name aftershe asked us not to.The following is a page from the notebook ofa girl in the biological science survey course.Adele....I mean....Phil Werner gave it to us,and we reproduce it here for your amusementand for the girl’s embarrassment.Lecture seven(much, much indecipherable scribbling)My dear Mr. B.—I just love your curly hair, and I think yonhave the cutest mannerisms. Oh, please, dear Mr.B., can’t I join your discussion class, and baskin the sunshine of your smile?(then, convinced that the truth is most effective,the girl wrote the second version)Mr. B.I don’t like you, but I wish you would let mebe in your discussion section becau.se I have aninterest, not in the subject, but in one of your stu¬dents in the section.This requires no comment except that “Mr.B’’ is Mr. Boyer of the Botany department whomAdele....I mean....Phil says is “a cute youngfellow with wavy hair and a lovely smile.’’* « «BROTHERS IN THE BONDIt was over at the Zeta Bete house, and NoelGerson was introducing Julian Levy, a prominentyoung Chicago lawyer and a Z. B. T. alumnus,to the actives in the chapter.“Julian”, said Noel, in his most fraternal man¬ner, “This is Frank Moss. Surely you knowFrank’s sister?”“Nope, can’t say I do.”“Well, then jmu probably know his father, Mr.Moss?”“Never met him.”“Julian”, said Noel, desperately, “then youmust know his uncle, Mr. Solomon the famousbrewer.”Julian’s face brightened up. “Oh yes I knowSolomon... .in fact I’ve got a fifteen thousanddollar suit against him glad to meet you,Brother Moss.”* « *BUILDINGS AND GROUNDSIn each of the University parking stations theiare reserved spaces for members of the faculty.These spaces are indicated by small signs withthe name of the holder printed on them.Over near the Physiology building there i.« aspace reserved for Zilch but at the parkingground to the left of the chapel there are threenames....Filbey, Stifler and CHRIST!!!This strikes us as being pretty appropriate.Maybe the B. & G. department has a sense ofhumor after all.Editor, Daily Maroon,Dear Mr. Barden:In the Maroon editorial of January17, several statements appearedwhich are deserving of correctionsbecause they are apparently based onfalse assumptions and a lack of ac¬quaintance with certain fields of in¬tellectual pursuit.First, the statement was madeabout the sacreiiness and inviolabil¬ity of scientific facts. We believethat the most superficial examinationof any scientific journal would dem¬onstrate to the writer of the editorialthat no small part of scientific re¬search is concerned with countle.sscorroborations and more often nega¬tions of the findings of other work¬ers. Only after a given set of datahas undergone a most rigorous andcritical examination will any scient-j ist deserving of the name accept it asI factual. If the writer is sufficiently' interested to te.st the truth of our! statement, we refer him to any good! history of biological or physical sci-ence.j Secondly, the Maroon writer mis-; understands the purpose of the de-! tailed technical work making up thej body of any science. Facts precede\ the concept of the theory. If newor contrary data are found, the hy¬pothesis is altered. The validity ofa theory is in direct propoition tothe number of fact.s to which it isapplicable and it is ol>vious that theapplicability can only he determinedby controlled, exact experiments.Therefore, from this point of viewthere is a definite justifieation forany scientific fact.Is it not possi)>le that the truefunction of a university is merelyto dispense facts and inculcate acritical attitude of mind which a per¬son with intellectual stamina will sub¬sequently use in formulating his ownattitude toward life? (?n this pointit seems that the editorial writer andwe agree, and we recommend to himthe idea that examinations and thenecessary remembering of facts con¬nected with them are after all a mi¬nor detail and a slight pittance tobe rendered in exchange for the pos¬sibility of future intellectual breadthand freedom.Henry D. LedererLee HasenbuthSacredness and inviolability of sci¬entific fact, the editorial .said, was ia modern delusion. Most scientistsand all the public suffer from thedelusion, and those who are so af¬flicted have no busines.s in education.Since the close of the editorialstated that correlation of fact andtheory is the end of research, it doesnot seem apparent that the writerwas ignorant of the supposed inten¬tion of detailed technical work con¬nected with any science.The function of a university isnever “merely to dispense facts.”We agree that a university shoulddevelop a critical attitude of mindThe longest run from scrimmage iscredited to VV iilys Terry, of Yale,who covered 115 yards against OhioWesleyan in 1884.POLO TEAM PLAYSCULVER TOMORROWThe Maroon polo trio journey- ;Culver. Indiana, tomorrow, whor,-hopes to repeat its previous 5 l..5 win over the Vedettes.Complimentary tickets to all nol.games to be played at the CliicaL .I Riding club may be obtained at tli,1 Military office.®0Z *«;uaAgw a or:r. uns00:9 JWS0t::9 IIIJ,.IVW AHIVaHHHVHJMHXSiUI..IH3VWOISJO 1BV3H133MSaoutmio>izz NvrI? .wrAVONOWAVQNnS•4S P-»£9 ’3 8S8oz NvrAvannivs13X3^a61 NvrAVaiMJ.intxuif'i|x'H qJ!"S O Sojn jno 1^ JO iiuqi aqjlu»ujui«iJa)u^ JO auioiid^ aij) X|njj[; {«uoi)esu9§ j ISui|.. O H 3 a 3 D Is o s,,SI ojnpiid n ’.fajunoo oqj s*i,>a.\\s uisijauTiBui.loaqs sp .<q |»ut; pazi.ai|qnd o|ipi puw [)apiwj.>qun XuojB sauioo .vjnjaid a apq.w « ui ,aouoiiOHaaaDi s 0 s,.Has aoA .MaiLwSdv IH a.lOA .NO ONION VIS’ aH O'L.lnAHALAND HISINTERNATIONAL FAVORITESARE ON THE AIR.Thrilling words aren’t they?.A thousand times more thrilling when you are at theRiackhawk to see and hear them,join theMIDNIGHT FLYERSwithPIERRE ANDREEvery Monday at MidnightA Complete Floor ShowHeaded byEARL RICKARDMaster of Ceremonies•NORTHWESTERN TALENT TONIGHTDinner $1.25BLACKHAWKWabash at RandolphWhere to WorshipTHE FIRST UNITARIANCHURCHWoodlawn Avenue and Elast 57th StreetOGDEN VOGT, D.D., MinisterSUNDAY. JANUARY 21. 19341 :00 A. M.—“Shall We Sacrifice Morality toReligion?” Professor Clayton R.Bowen.4:00 P. M.NewtonAction.”-Channing Club Tea. Mr.Jenkins, “Effective PoliticalHYDE PARK METHODISTCHURCHBlackstone Ave. and Fifty-Fourth StreetGeorge H. Parkinson, PastorSUNDAY SERVICES. JANUARY 21. 193410:00 A. M.—^Church School.1 I :00 A. M.—“Young People Take Charge.Is it the morning or the evening twilightfor Christianity and Democracy? Dr.Parkinson.7:00 P. M.—Young People’s Society, Ep-worth League.A church home with a welcome, a message, and anopportunity to invest your personality in service.UNIVERSITY CHURCH OFDISCIPLES OF CHRIST5655 University AvenueDr. Edward Scribner Ames, MinisterSUNDAY. JANUARY 21, 193410:30 A. M.—Communion Service.1 I :00 A. M.—Sermon Subject: “Modern Preachers: Dr. EdgarDe Witt Jones.’’ Dr. Ames.6:00 P. M.—Wranglers. Tea. Program, “Capitalism vs. Social¬ism.” Debate between Mr. Barton Hunter and Mr. HomerDeadman.The Church ofThe Redeemer(EPISCOPAL)56th and BlackstoneRev, E. S. WhiteEpiscopal Student PastorSUNDAY SERVICESHoly Communion, 8:00 and9 :30 A. M.Choral Eucharist, 11:00 A. M.Evensong, 5:00 P. M.Three services every week-day.Church open daily for p*’ayer andmeditation.THE DAILY MAROON, FRIDAY, JANUAi/plan intramural Q fI track MEET FOR ^ um jorFEBRUARY 7, 8 Revenge AgainstBig, Bad WolvesAn all-University winter intra¬mural indoor track meet is scheduledfor Wednesday and Thursday, Feb¬ruary 7 and 8, according to WalterHebert, faculty Intramural managrer.All entries must be in the Intramuraloffice by FYiday, February 2.This competition is open to fra¬ternity, independent, and dormitoryteams without discrimination.Included in the program of eventswill be: 50, 100, and 220 yard dashes;ilO and 880 yard, and one mile runs;120 yard low hurdles; high jump;.‘ihot put; broad jump; and 880 yardrelay for a four man team.The winter track meet this seasonsupplants the intramural Carnival ofprevious years. Preliminaries will berun Wednesday, and finals Thursdayin Bartlett.JOHN STOCKSTRAVEL BUREAUHeadquarters—PressBuildingHours—10-12:30 A. M.1:30-4 P. M.I el. Mid. 0800—Loc. 118STEAMSHIPRAILROADAIR LINESBUSTours, Itineraries,TicketsNo Service ChargeRevenge for the overwhelming de¬feat handed them at Michigan will bethe' impetus behind the Maroons* at¬tack when they face the Wolverinesin the fieldhouse tomorrow night. De¬spite their setback, the Chicagoanshave an excellent chance of achiev¬ing their first conference victory ofthe season.Neither quintet has exhibited muchstrength in the games played thusfar. Michigan has lost to Indiana,Wisconsin, and Northwestern, whilewinning from the Maroons. OhioState and Illinois, in addition toMichigan, have conquered Chicago.Nels Norgren’s men showed im¬provement in the Illini game overtheir form in previous tilt.'!. Theirdefensive play was much better, andill the second half their offense wasstrong enough to overcome an eightpoint lead. Practice se.ssions thisweek were mainly devoted to scrim¬mages among the varsity players withthe aim of developing a pow'erfulattack against Michigan.Wolve* ErraticThe Wolverines’ chief difficultyhas been the erratic shooting of theforwards. .Allen and Rudness willprobably start at the forward posi-(ions; .lablonski will be at center, andCaptain Petoskey and Tessmer willplay guards. Allen and .lablonskihave been the outfit’s best scorersthis year.Tommy Flinn, who was slated tostart at forward, suffered a charleyhorse in practice Wednesday, and asa result, may not play. In the eventthat Flinn does not start, his placewill be taken by Bob Pyle. Hob is abetter shot than Tommy, but Flinn’sguarding ability’is needed by theteam.The other men who will play to¬morrow are Haarlow at forward, Pe¬terson at center, and Lang and Op-penheim at the guards.. . COURTESY STUDENT-ARTIST PASS . .experimentalThe CUBE218 South Wabash AvenueOn the Fourth FloorSAT.—JAN. 20th—8:20 p. m.Distinguished Actor—DiseurWALTON PYRE•FRANSCESCA d> RIMINI”Balcony—.50cART THEATREChicago’s OwnTheatrical WorkshopSUN.—JAN. 21ft—8:20 p. m.Sensational—ANDREYEV’SWALTZ of the DOCSGreatest Russian PlayMain Floor—75cPhone for ReservationsSWIMMERS DEFEATlOrOLA, 43-41, INSERSON OPENEII HEREMaroon tankmen won a hard-fought swimming meet last nightfrom Loyola university, 43 to 41, toopen the 1934 season. Max Briden-thal of Loyola, former Lake Shoreathletic club star, turned in the bestperformance of the evening, whenhe won the 200-yard breast stroke in2:34.9—only four .seconds over theintercollegiate record time for theevent.A 400-yard medley relay openedthe meet with the Maroon team of.John Barden, Lonnie Levi, A1 Sachs,and Phil Stein winning a close racefrom the Loyolans. In the backstroke, George Nicoll and Don Bell-strom took first and second placeseasily, while Barden turned in a firstin the short 60-yard swim. Jim El-well, Loyola champ, then, was vic¬torious in the long 440-yard eventwith “Babe” B'n.sh coming up frombehind to take second place. By win¬ning more than 98 points and easilycapturing seven out of the ten re¬quired dives, John Roberts talliedfive more points for the Maroons withNick Kearns of Loyola taking secondplace. In the next event, the 220-yard swim, Elwell of the Orange andRed was pu.shed all the way by Bushand Stein, but he managed to win in2:37.2. Ending with the medley re¬lay in which Loyola was victorious,the meet proved that the Maroonsneed a great deal of practice beforethey enter their first conference meeton February 3 when they engage Wis¬consin in Bartlett pool.Water Polo Team LosesThe water polo team, consisting ofCaptain Nahser, Bellstrom, Will, Sto-lar, Bush, Stein, Nicoll, and a num¬ber of substitutes, met an Illinoisathletic club group made up of form¬er Olympic stars in a fast game inwhich the Maroons .showed decidedstrength and teamwork. With oneMaroon goal dispu ed, the officialscore was announced as 7-4. Whenall parts of the Maroon play are tak¬en into consideration, the team show¬ed much improvement over that oflast year and will probably be in tip-lop .shape for the conference openerwith Wisconsin.SchlitzatBedtimeinduces sound, restfulsleep. It soothes thenerves—it is health¬ful. It cannot causeindigestion.The Beer That Made MilwaukeeCopjrW^tod, Jm. SokUCi Br«wtec Co.. 1M4Fans Attend I-MBasketball Games;See Wierd SightsThough five basketball games werescheduled for last night’s Intramuralcompetition, one football game, onelop-sided contest which resembled thecage sport, and two fairly evenbasketball games were actually onview in Bartlett gym. The fifth con-rtict was forfeited to the Phi Kapswhen most of the D. U. team wastardy in showing up.In one of the wildest and rough¬est games ever played on the Intra¬mural courts, a makeshift Deke sec¬ond five, including “Tarzan” Deem,tackled, blocked, and charged in amanner most pleasing to CoachShaughnessy; yet were unable toscore more than 6 points while thePhi Psi seconds, led by Harry Mor¬rison, tallied 20. One of the high¬lights was a shot at the wrong bask¬et by B'en Mann.Psi U. Runs WildShowing exceptional ability for aB team, the Psi U outfit held the S.A. E.’s sdoreless during the secondhalf while they counted 23 markers.The official scorer credited the Uni¬versity avenue lads with 35 pointsfor the evening, while Sigma AlphaEpsilon scored four, all of them byBaker. Dix, with 12 points, was highscorer for the winners, and prob¬ably the most important cog in theirvictory.Led by George Novak, the AlphaSigs handily outclassed the S. A. E.first team, 27 to 16, in one of themore interesting contests. Eventhough the victors held a two pointload at the half, they clearly showedtheir superiority near the end of thegame as fewer setups were missedand better teamwork came about./\ list minute rally by the Disciplesclimaxed their 25 to 21 win over theSpartans in the closest, though dull¬est game of the four. McDiarmidscored all but six of the Disciples’points and played a good all-aroundgame.WRESTLING TOURNEYThe sixth wrestling championshiptournament will be held at the field-house January 25, 26, and 27, it wasannounced yesterday by S. K. Vorres, ; jMaroon wrestling coach. Entries forthe meet will close January 22.Chess I earn Losesto ‘Y’; TournamentRegistration Openi>The University chess team lost itsfirst meet of the quarter Tuesdaynight to the Irving Park “Y” team, 7to 1. Dave Blumenstock w’as the onlyMaroon player to win his match. Thenext match of the team will beagainst the Chicago Chess and Bridgeclub on January 30.Registration for the annual Rey¬nolds club round robin chess tourna¬ment, which begins January 30, willclose Tuesday at 5. Official Reynoldsclub awards of gold and silver med¬als will be presented to the winners.CT.afte/ trtheir ojana’s Bi,ate cham Blooi.ington. Ai ^ of histeam last Sat^ S. K. Vor¬res is ■'optini c Maroonchances against nom’s cham¬pion Hoosiers. ' i ,Max Bern.stein, _pt out of the j ® ‘Illinois meet becaise of a boil on |his neck, will probab.y wrestle at 118 i Wellesley rpounds, witp either Brrton or Hauser ' when a male stat 126 poi^nds. Indiana’s 126-pound- art class.(liv.earnspeedy iFactor isberth, witho-edin anTHE STORE FOR MEN\rrJust Because Ifs Over for the Clubs-Don’t think for a minute you’re ever going to sew up that gorgeous little blondnishee that you’ve been working on in Psychology, unless you get on the wellknown ball and, incidently, unless you discontinue coming to class in that arrayof archaic tatters that you call a suit. Yes, indeed, young man, you can’t start rest¬ing on the oars or you’ll find the old cause dying on the sack. Now is the timefor action. Time, we would say, to swing into that campaign of intensive mid¬winter rushing if you expect to find yourself, “in there pitching ball” along abouttime for the Prom and that very special winter formal. You well know,of course, what a new suit from Field’s can do in the way of building up moraleto help you in your effort to tear down sales resistance. Take for instance thesebeautiful new suits selling at $36.50. Can’t you just see the look of awe one ofthem would bring to the eyes of a heretofore indifferent little club girl? They arereal values, too. You’ll find plaids, checks, stripes, and solid colors in all thelatest shades and fabrics. The offering includes double and single breasted Drapeslwith the new plaited trousers or double and single breasted models, if you pre-[fer. Remember this is not a clearance, but merchandise purchased especially forthis sale.THE STORE FOR MENMARSHALL FIELD& COMPANYITIMPERFECLuckiesFor i/tede aw the Mildestand fullij ripe/ied^rrnei^f s?nokm^usedinWe buy only the center leaves for Luckies.Not the top leaves for they are under-devel¬oped. Not the bottom leaves for they areinferior in quality. Only the center leavesfor these are truly mild and fully ripe. Andthat’s the fine tobacco we use—to makeLuckies so round, so firm, so fully packed—free from looseends that spill out. That’swhy Luckies are always mild, always trulymild. And remember, “It’s toasted”—for throat protection — for finer taste.roisereawayand CsensicaThe .at the tU:no haveit monthscal comedylorses” withmpletely mad,“musical run-Russell Crousewith many non-by Joe Cook,d in New York Citye centui-y. Every ef-SPECIAL Offer-Philco RADIOS^1^1 down *1^ per weekEXPERT REPAIR SERVICEOpen Evenings Until 10A. J. F. LOWE & SONMidway 07821217 E. 55th St.Kimbark HotelRates $5.50 Up24 HOUR SERVICE105 RoomsNewly decorated with private baths, tubsand showers6324 Kimbark Ave.Phone Plaza 4500I .MAROON, FRIDAY. JANUARY 19, 193479'1-svouldat it.”, Broad-nterven-1 comedylor his op-yor of Newhe action cen-fianchise whichf^ifnd” wants toil Oiand beea! ponent, i.N ork. Fix' ters arounuJoe, “the hiI veto. . IBut the plot i^’of inYortance onlyas a line on which to hing the gags.Cook is known as the li^tning com¬edian, but “Hold Your ^Horses” isfaster than a» three-ring circus. Yousimply can't stop laughing longenough to catch all the gags.Joe himeslf does. Citerything. Hesings .dances, juggles a barrel on hisfeet—and never misses a trick. He’sa master showman, for he even suc¬ceeds in making hilariously funny.stunts which would ordinarily noteven be amusing, as for instance his“explanation of the ballet” in thefirst act, and the utterly meaninglessprimer story (from a real primer)he reads to the audience and assort¬ed irate tax-payers, in the second act.Dave Chasen is a riot as BfoadwayJoe’s body-guard. He wears more ab¬surd costumes and takes more pun¬ishment—anything for a laugh. TomI'atricola is effective as Kid Hogan,but we would like to have seen moredances by him. Dorothy Dare whoperforms with him is very easy onllie eye and also sings and dancespleasingly. June O’Dea is adequateuiul ornamental in the leading fem¬inine role, and she is ably assisted by.li iry Norris as Alan Donovan.Harriet Hoctor, who bids fair torank as one of America’s finest danseuses, is miraculously graceful andwholly enchanting in the two—andall too few—'ballet numbers in the. Iiow. The flea circus ballet is oneof the cleverest, and at the samelime, one of the most effectivelystaged dance creations we have everseen.“Hold Your Horses” is scheduledto stay in Chicago for only threeweeks. We predict a sell-out for theiim, and disappointment for the mu¬sical-comedy fans who fail to see it.STOCKS OPENS NEWTRAVELERS’ BUREAUJust back from a trip around thewoild which included South Africaand South America, John Stocks hasopened a travel bureau on the cam¬pus, with headquarters m the PiessBuilding. Until June, 1933, Mr.Stocks was manager of the travelbureau of the First National Bankof Chicago, a post he held for fiveyears. Prior to that he was tourmanager and cruise conductor for oneof the large tour companies and inthat capacity made four trips aroundthe world besides innumerable short¬er tours and cruises. Mr. Stocksis thus prepared to advise on alltravel matters and holds the agenciesfor all steamship, air, motor coach,and tour companies.Today on theOnadranglesCOLLEGE INN FLOORSHOW WILL HONORFt JR FRATERNITIESIThe College Inn tonight will fea¬ture an all-Chicago floor show in aCollege night honoring four fratern¬ities from the Chicago camiius. Thefraternities to be lionored are Psi U,Deke, Phi Psi, and .\lpha Delt.The Inn has for several months inthe past been featuring college nightswithout any particular reference tofraternity. Tonight’s show will fea¬ture Marshall Zeinan. a clever dia¬lectician, Irving Harris and JoelHerron at two pianos, Fiances Hel¬ler, a very talented and clever youngdancer, and Norman Masterson, bluesI singer.‘‘S. O. S. Iceberg’’ IsFeatured at DrexelToday and TomorrowUniversal’s screen saga of the arc¬tic, “S. 0. S. Iceberg,” has been book¬ed for the Drexel theater. 8.')8 E. OSrdstreet, for T‘''riday and Saturday.Movie goers jaded with sophisticatedfare out of Hollywood are otferedsights and sounds of tlie polar regionsas background to a .«wift-movingdrama of adventure and undauntedlove.The filming of the picture wasfraught with hazards. Universal sentan expedition, composed of 38 actors,technicians, and scientists, into north¬ern Greeland, only lo degrees fromthe north pole. For six months thecompany fought cold, exposure, andliardships in an effort to capture au¬thentic shots for a story of a lostexpedition. Dr. Arnold Fanck, lead¬er of the expedition, required theaid of Knud Rasmussen, noted Dan¬ish explorer.The equipment for the expeditionincluded motor sledges, motor boats,an enormous stock of provisions,three Junker airplanes, and portableelectric devices designed against theextreme cold to insure sound record¬ing of arctic phenomina never beforebrought to the screen.The Daily MaroonNight Editor for the next issue:Howard Hudson. Assistant: HenryKelley.M usic and ReligionJoseph Bond chapel. ProfessorKastman, Chicago Theological Sem¬inary, at 12.Phonograph Concert, Social Sci¬ence Assembly hall, at 12:30.Lectures“Intellectual History of WesternEurope. Roman Rhetoric and RomanLaw.’’ .Associate F’rofessor MortimerJ. Adler. Social Science 122, at 3:30.^ “Theory of the Cell.” ProfessorGeorge Link. Harper M 11, at 4;4r>,“Kinetic Theory of Gases,” Dr,Beardsley. Fullerton Hall, the Art Institute, at 6:45.“Conquest of Mount Everest inApril 1933,” .\ir Commander P. F.M. Fellowes. Leon Mandel hall, at8 :30.“Economic Relation between Unit¬ed State.s, Russia and Poland,” Wal-cry Starezewski. Slavonic Club. In¬ternational House, Room .A., at 8.MiscellaneousW. A. A. Cozy, Y. W. C. .4. room,Ida Noyes hall, at 3:30.Ida Noyes Open House. Ida Noyeshall. 8 to 12.“End of St. Petersburg,” SovietF'ilm. Social Science .Assembly hall,at 8:30.SATURDAY. JANUARY 20, 1934MiscellaneousUniversity Basketball Game. Chi¬cago vs. Michigan. Fieldhouse, at 8.Freshman Cla.ss Dance. Ida Noyestheater, 9 to 12.SUNDAY. JANUARY 21, 1934Music and ReligionI’niversity Chapel. Kirtley F. Math¬er Ph. D., Professor of Geology,Harvard University, at 11.Carillon Recital. Harold Simonds,Carilloneur. University Chapel, at3 :30.Join Smart ChicagoTonightin theJoseph Urban RoomSPEND WHATYOU PLEASE!For a thrilling night inthe world’s most daz¬zling Supper-Club.NOCOVER ORMinimum ChargeExcept SaturdayEnjoy the scintillatingUrban atmosphere—sophisticated enter-tainment superbdance music andPAY ONLY FORWHAT YOU ORDER'Special Supper. . . .$1CARLOS MOLINAThe Aristocrat of BandsCongress HotelAlways the Finest TobaccoCop^risbt. Id34, The American Tobacco Company.Lucky Strike Presents the Metropolitan Opera CompanySaturday at 2 P, M., Eastern Strike presents the MetropolitanStandard Time, over Red and Opera Company in the completeBlue Networks of NBC, Lucky opera “DON GIOVANNI”.and only the Center Leaves©ailp j\ ol. 34. No. 55.UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, FRIDAY, JANUARYWhat of It-By SIDNEY HYMAN-\ ARIATIONS ON A THEME1 proposed to use a |)assa>re fromilu' Book of Numbers as a text fortoday’s .<ermon, but, unfortunately,here were no telephone directorieshand, (laughter) so I had to con-t, !it myself with a passajre from\mos.And the Lord said to .\mos, “Gounto the clubwomen of the I’niver-,ity of Chicago and say unto them,'i ou have amused me with your pre¬tenses. You have painted your lips,blanched your cheeks, and pluckedyour eyebrows, and the few remain-iii>r hairs you have soused with mas-eara. Your eyes have rinprs underthem larpre enough to stage a Bai‘-num and Bailey Circus. You havewrapped the nakedness of your abil¬ities with the corners of your clubjuns, and you arc content that your-hame is secure from sight. (Loud ap¬plause). Though I was tired fromchuckling, I did not restrain you, forIt was for the purpose of amusingme, that I brought you forth out ofthe land of oblivion.“But now that you have takenunto yourselves new pledges, I warnyou not to teach them the art of be¬ing mysterious about things obviousthat they may be more seductive. Iwarn you that you do not teach'.hern the tricks of a Houdini in the.ability to create something out ofnothing. ... in the instance of thepledges, the art of creating conver¬sation out of hot air. I warn you ofthis, lest my amusement with humanfoibles grow so great that I die ofpleasure.” And Amos said, “O. K.,God,” and went his way.And Amos, who had never heardof clubs before, went to seek whatthey were before he could talk ofthem. And so he asked 5,000 peopleat the University of Chicago whattheir reactions weie to women’sclubs. “Clubs? Clubs?’’ they asked.“Never lead with a club,” they re¬plied. Then they laughed in theirhandkerchiefs. It was an old gag oftheirs. (Prolonged laughter.) Then.Amos saw that clubs had so concen- it rated themselves, that, w'hereasmany personalities existed at onetime, now only one entity existed.And the one had so concentrated it¬self that it bordered on non-exist¬ence. That i'J why no one knew of itheir existence. (Cries of Bravo!)Then did Amos see that he couldnot learn of clubs by asking studentsabout them, because mo.st studentswent about their work unconscious Iof the existence of such institutions.So Amos determined to go to rockbottom and seek out the clubs, thathe might address them with the wordsof the Lord, So he went to the Cof-feee Shoppee. the “C” bench, andthe lounge of Ida Noyes Hall.It was as though he were in a cave |of W'inds. The blasts in these places ;were maddening. But it was impos- isible to determine which club emit- ^ted the hollowest blasts. Again he icould not separate the clubs that he imight lecture them about their hum¬orous antics. .As there are no dif¬ferences between protoplasms of hu¬man beings, so are clubs, which, forthe purposes of this discussion, may jbe said to be human beings, are not |otherwise. For all clul.'s are made upof protoplasm.“Now the word of the Lord weigh¬ed heavy with .Amos. God told himto warn the clubs from being tooamusing a spectacle. But Amoslearned only by rumor that they ex¬isted, and knowing that many a hap¬py household was broken up due toan idle roomer, (sustained applause)Amos waxed hot with anger insteadof with amusement, and for this he.sinned against God.And Amos started fighting theclubs, but fighting the clubs was likefighting a shadow; it tires the boxerwithout affecting the shadow. Amosdied of exhaustion and above histomb there was erected a monumentupon which was inscribed, HOMOSAPIENS UEMENTIUM E PLURI-BUS UNUM.Indeed my flock, Amos could notfind the clubs, for clubs are a .stateof mind. They are predicated on theassumption that other people willfeel badly about not being a memberof the particular group. They aremagnified calling cards in the busi¬ness of eliciting deference from theproletariat, and in-so-far as they sosucceed, they reflect on the sadstate of intelligence of those who paythem court. In a word they areharmless institutions and should beeticouraged by proper symbols. PageVIr. Schuman.PICK SOUTH SHORECOUNTRY CLUB FORANNUAIJORMALAnnounce Orchestra forWashington PromNext WeekThe Washington Prom will be heldat the South Shore Countiy Club,according to an announcement madeyesterday by Evelyn ('arr. chairmanI of the committee on arrangementsfor the dance. The Prom will be heldon February 21, the eve of Washing-i ton’s birthday, as it has been for thepast tw'enty-nine years.The orche.'^tra for the dance willbe announced sometime next week, assoon as final ariangements havebeen made and contracts have beensigned. Negotiations are being car¬ried on with Clyde Mc(’oy, Tom G*‘n-try, Mark Fisher and Chailie Agnew,and it is expected that one of thesebands will play. According to pres¬ent plans, two orchestras will behired, in order that continuous musicmay be supplied during the evening.Scene of Social AffairsThe South Shore Country Club hasbeen the scene of many of majorUniversity social events for over adecade. One of the three majordances last year, the Military Ball,given in the spring quarter, was heldthere. Since the Washington Promusually attracts the largest crowds ofthe season, the South Shore CountryClub was chosen in preference toprivate rooms in downtown hotels,where, it was feared, seating capac¬ity would not be sufficient.The price of bids for the affairwill be $5, and will include a mid¬night supper. Tickets wdll be placedon sale within the next ten days, andfraternity and dormitory representa¬tives will be appointed at that timeto sell them. Each salesman who sellsten bids for the dance will be givena complimentary ticket. Provisionsare being made for approximately700 people.Salesmen WantedAny man wishing to sell bids forthe Prom is asked to report to Her¬man Odell, chairman of the ticketsales committee, within the nextweek, in order that preference maybe given to salesmen anxious to workon the dance. The freshman councilwill be asked to appoint four .-sales¬men to represent that class in ticketsate distribution.The Prom la.st year was held atthe Congress hotel. Hal Kemp fur-nislied the music.Renowned AviatorRecalls AdventuresBRITISH AIRMAiDEPICTS EVERESTFLIGHT TONIGHTP. F. M. Fellowes Speaksin Fourth of StudentLecture SeriesSciNiew Grid AssAir-Commander FellowesMAROON ENOS FIRSTPART OF SURVEY ONSTATUS OF GRADESDr. Mather, Explorerand Geologist, Talksat Chapel ServicesKirtley Mather, professor of Geo¬logy at Harvai-d university, will bethe speaker^ at the l^niversity chapelservice Sunday at 11.Professor Mather has been chair¬man of the department of Geologyand Geography at Harvard since1925. Since 1919, he has been geo¬logist of the United States Geologi¬cal Survey, and he conducted explora¬tion in eastern Bolivia in 1919 and1920. Professor Mather is chairmanof the editorial board of the Scien¬tific Book Club, and a fellow of theGeological Society of America, TheAmerican Academy of Arts and Sci¬ences, and the Engineering-EconomicFoundation.Some of the books Professor Math¬er has written are “Fauna of theMorrow Formation,” “Old MotherEarth,” and “Science in Search ofGod.” He is also contributing editorto World Unity magazine and haswritten government bulletins andpopular articles for the Forum andAtlantic Monthly. |Professor Mather is interested in |tracing the relations between science iand religion. His book, “Science in jSearch of God,” is recognized as acontribution to this field. |Half of Freshman andSophomore ClassesState Opiniond’he first part of The Daily Ma¬roon’s grade questionnaire projectends today. At this time it seemsi that over lialf of the freshman andsophomores will have expressed anopinion.1 The last chance for these twocla.sses to vote w’ill be provided atthe entrance to the ('obb Hall C(/i-lege library this afteinoon between2:30 and 4:30. It is hoped that allI those who have not voted will makej an effort to do so today.Next week those who ha' '> qualifiedI for their college certificates underthe new plan will be reached by mail..A (luestionnaire which may be le-turneii to The Daily .Mai'oon through^ the faculty exchange, will be sent toeach one.Tabulate ResultsThe results of the questionnairewill be tabulated by members of TheDaily Maroon staff under the direc¬tion of William Reitz, assistant tothe Dean of Students, who assistedthe Maroon in preparing the ques¬tionnaire. When the returns are in.the complete figures will be releas¬ed, with an analysis of the study andhow it was set up. published in full.This report will be sent to PresidentHutchins for consideration. ThusThe Daily Maroon feels that it willhave made a significant contributionto the workings of the new plan. |Besides the specific questions onthe grade system, the students havebeen asked for comments on variousphases of the new plan. Actuallythese remarks wiil have no bearing ina survey of this sort.OPEN HOUSE TONIGHTA second open house is being spon¬sored by the Ida Noyes AdvisoryCouncil tonight from 8 to 12. All thefacilities of Ida Noyes hall will beavailable to students for dancing,cards, bowling, and numerous othergames. Refreshments will be served.GERMANY PREPARESFOR WAR, SCHUMANTELLS N. S. L. GROUP“There are no grounds for thesupposition that Gei many is not pre-[laring for war,” stated Dr. FredericL. Schuman, assistant jirofes-sor ofPolitical Science, at the tea given yes¬terday afternoon in his honor at IdaNoyes hall by the National StudentlAiague.In his di><cussion of his recent tripto Russia and Germany, he addedthat “Hitlerism represents the mob¬ilization and deflection of resentmenttowards big business and labor lead¬ership to the conviction that thesenatural enemies are actually underthe control of the Jews, who are con¬spiring to rule the world. While un¬der delusion control of propagandaw'as achieved, so even if bourgeoisiebecome undeceived there is no chance ifor them to regain power.” |“The main difficulties in the Five iYear Plan of Russia as 1 see them,” |Dr. Schuman said, “are bureaucracy, |demoralization, stupidity of the peas-!antry, and increased differences bo-jtween classes, w'hich seems strange 1in an equalitarian society.”Notre Dame Starto A id Shau^hnessyFormer IrishWill Begin Vin Spring(’ommander P. T’’. M. Fellowes,; British airman, will sjieak on “The(’oiKpiest of Mt. Everest” in thefourth of the Student Lecture seriesthis evening in Mandel hall at 8:3().Motion pictures of Fellowes’ astound¬ing flight over the crest of the world’shighest mountain will accompany hislecture.The celebrated British air leaderi has had a life full of adventure.I While his Mt. Everest flight rateshigh among scientific achievements,I Fellowes’ other acts of daring havej frequently jdaced him on the frontnews pages. In April, 1918, after theBritish Navy had failed to block thesubmarine base of Zeebrugge, Fel¬lowes and his famous Squadron 202 ;undertook the job. Facing almostcertain death, Fellowes dropped inhis plane to a bare 50 feet to bombthe locks and impi ison the German ^submarine fleet.Held Pri*oner in War-After he had successfully stojipedthe German submarine attack, Fel¬lowes was shot down and held pris¬oner. Since the war F'ellowes hascommanded two air expeditions toConstantinople and recently surveyedthe Cairo-Bagdad air route.Anticipating the many difficultiesto be encountered in the Houston-Mt. Everest flight, the backers of theflight persuaded the British air min¬istry to appoint F’ellowes Commander.Photographs taken during his 34,-500 foot climb over the crest of Ev¬erest have answered many questionsabout the hitherto unknown glaciers,' unconquerable except by air.Epic FlightI At his highest altitude, whichI cleared the historic mountain by a! scant 100 feet, Fellowes battled aI 110-mile an hour gale, at a tempera-{ ture of 70 degrees below zero. All1 equipment used on the actual flightI had to be heated and insulated towithstand the temperatures,j Tickets for the lecture by Com-■ inandei’ F’ellowes may be obtained ati the Mandel cloister box office, Wood-I worth’s Bookstore and the Fniver-! sity Bookstore. Tickets for the lec¬ture by Raymond Moley, interna-I tional economist, on F’ebruary 0 arealso on sale. Main floor seats are 55; cents and 85 cents. Balcony seats are55 cents.i Fifty-Six Students,Faculty Leave forDruce Lake MeetingNames of those who are taking theannual Druce lake trip Saturdaywere announced yesterday by RobertWalker. Those who will attend areDr. Melville Herskovits, Mrs. HenryWieman, Arthur Holt, Dr. HenryHoughton, Eugene Staley, Mary Gil¬son, Jerome Kerwin..Aaron Brumbaugh, Mollie Carroll,F’errest Kingsbury, Arthur Scott,Charles Gilkey, Mrs. Harvey Carr,Clarence Cade, Preston Cutler,Beatrice Achtenberg, Fdma Stauffer,Connie Fish, Ruth Pier, Ray Rock-wood, Sidney Hyman, Alvin Pitcher,Phyllis Green, Louise Craver, Mad¬eline Strong, Helen de Werthenn,Bettyann Nelson, Mary Antonie,Lily David, Lewis Dexter, LynnStiies, Marie Berger, Allis Graham,Rae Rips.Hildegard von Poven, ThroopVaughn, Margaret Clark, WarrenThompson, Theodore Noss, Jack MeLanahan, William Minor, SewardHiltner, Anna Martin F^indlay, Mrs.Noble, Geraldine Smithwick, JamesMcDevitt, Mary Walter, LeonardNathan, Jack Allan, Merle Giles, |Blanche Kleinman, Charles McCoy, IJohn Barden, Curtis Plopper, Lillian '.Schoen, and Robert Walker.RACKET DISCUSSION IMarchmont Schwartz6IANNINI, AMERICANSOPRANO, PRESENTSCONCERT TOESOAYAppears in Recital Given byUniversity OrchestralAssociationThe .American sopiano, DusolinaGiannini, will present a concert underthe auspices of the University Or¬chestral association Tuesday eveningat 8:30 in Mandel hall. Tickets fo’.the event are now on sale from 1 co4 at the office of the association snCobb 202. They are priced at $1,$1.25, and $1.50. .‘'tudent tickets forthe series of Chicago Symphony cam¬pus concerts will admit the ownersto the concert.Madame Giannini is a Flurofieanfavorite, for she has nade five toursof the continent, appearing in recital,in oiiera. and with synuihony oi’ches-tras. She has appeared with practi¬cally every major orchestra in thiscountry.Subs for Claire DuxThe singer was born in Philadel¬phia of Italian parents. She receivedall of hei' musical education in thiscountry, jireceding the New York de¬but which brought her sudden fame.Her first musical studies were underthe tutelage of her father, who hadbeen a well-known tenor and hadsung in opera with Adelina Patti.i.ater she went to New York tocontinue her studies with Mme. Mar¬cella Sembrich. F’our years later shereceived the opportunity of substi¬tuting for an indisposed singer, andthis debut marked her first musicaltriumph.Madame Giannini is appearing inthe place of Claire Dux, formerlyscheduled foi- the Tuesday eveningconcert, since Miss Dux has cancell¬ed all engagements for the season.Marchmont Schwai'tz. Notre! Dame’s .All-America half-back, wasappointed an a.ssistant football coachyestei'day by Clai'k 1). Shaughnessy,head ot the Maroon coaching staff.Schwartz, l)ackfield coach at NotreDame under Hartley .Anderson, sincethe spring of 1932, will start workon the Midway in March, when springI practice for the football .reason be-I gins.j Shaughnessy and Schwaitz have1 been friends for many years, since■ the days that the Notre Dame .starI was a high-school athlete at St. Stan-1 islaus, Bay St. Louis, near New Or-! leans, where Shaughnessy was coach-j ing at Loyola. “Marchie” was onj Shaughnessy’s freshman team in 19271 but left Loyola to go to NotT’e Dame,j where he won national fame.j Trip,*e-Threat ManSchwartz played football at NotreDame in 1929, 1930, and 1931, hisposition being that of left half, the“triple threat” position of the Rock-ne sy.stem. In his junior and senioryears he was an “All-America” halfback. The Notre Dame teams onwhich Schwartz played in 1929 and1930 were undefeated national cham¬pions and it was not until the lasttwo games of his career that he wason a losing team. Southern Cali¬fornia won 16 to 14 with its famousrally, and Army defeated NotreDame the next week 12 to 0. Thoughhe w’as an all-around athlete in highschool, Schwartz engaged in no othersports at Notre Dame.Works with LopezBut 24 years old, Schwartz is re-I garded as one of the ablest youngj coaches in the country. At Chicago,I he and Julian Lopez, backfield coachwhom Shaughnessy brought up from! Loyola, will work with the backs.■ “I am very pleased that Schwartz1 is coming here,” Shaughnessy said inannouncing the appointment. “I haveI known him since he was a boy andI have had the highest regard for him.I He will be a big help to the ChicagoI team, tor he is one of the 'oest youngcoaches in the business. He knowshow to give players the techniqueand polish that will enable them todo their jobs with precision and ef¬fectiveness.”Mirror InauguratesNew Chorus; HoldsTryouts Next WeekPLAN INTERNATIONALHOUSE DINNER-DANCEFOR WINTER SEASONStudents who wish to work onthe production staffs of Mirrorand Playfest are asked to reportto the Tower room in Mitchelltower any afternoon next week.Morrison Handsaker, an authorityon the cleaning and dyeing businessin Chicago, will discuss “Racketeer¬ing and the Clea-iing Business” to-1day at 1:30 in the Common room of IHaskell hall. The lecture is under jthe auspices of the Graduate Econom- >ic and Business Club. 'International House inauguratesits winter social activities with a din¬ner-dance tomorrow night from 7:30to 1 for members of the House andtheir guests and for students of theUniversity. Harry Berkover’s orches¬tra, w’hich furnished music for theChristmas dance, has been chosen bythe Social Committee to play for thedance.The hostesses for the dinner-danceare Margot Boertlein, Ruth Buffing¬ton, Julia Cottrell, Helen Hiett, V’ir-ginia Jeffiies, Peggy Marshall, andPeggy Rittenhouse. The hosts areCharles F'rost, Arthur Going, HerbertJe’’osch, and John Pelzel.Members may secure tickets fromthe cashier for the dinner and dancefor $1.25 each, and for the dance onlyfor 50 cents each. Guests and stu¬dents may purchase tickets for thedinner-dance for $1.50 each and forthe dance only for 75 cents each.Marking an innovation in its pro¬duction, the Mirror Board yesterdayissued a call for applicants for anew choi'us which will make its firstappearance in the annual productionMarch 2 and 3. Tryouts will be heldin the Ida Noyes Theater Tuesdayand Wednesday afternoons between4:30 and 5:30. Women applying areasked to wear bathing suits and softshoes.The Board has planned the chorusas a departure from former Mirrordancing. The group will have few¬er members than the ballet, and mem¬bers will be carefully selected witha view to their ability to participatein the specialty numbers which arenow being outlined.-Additions to the production com¬mittees were announced yesterday bythe Board. Betty Patterson has beenTiamed to assist Evelyn Carr, thestage manage!', in directing back-stage production.FRESHMAN MIXERl/iury Smith and his orchestra willfurnish the music for the mixer to beheld Saturday night, in Ida Noy'eshall aftei' the Chicago-Michigan bask¬etball game. The mixer is sponsoredby the Freshman Council, and therewiil be no admission price. Refresh¬ments will be served.IN ORIGINALVjOK f^RIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1934an» that "pro-itary training in allmilitary training underat the University of Wis-'4 iiO by mail. c■^sumed by the University vi ChicagoH ; ■ in The Ih ily Mareei.. f. r any. b-. The Daily Maroi'n.rla#» matter Maroh I “• '.sns at the I'ns’-iia.i.iis, unWer the Vet u{ .March .s, IST**ilarc->n expressly reser. . si. rinht . f puhlica: i mT ai'l'earnic in this paper.BOARD OF CONTROLA P. BARDEN, Editor-in-Chief. iNCENT NEWMAN, Business ManagerWILLIAM GOODSTEIN. Managing EditorWALTER L. MONTGOMERY, Cd ulalienJANE I. BIESENTIIAL. Associate F'i t.uBETTY HANSEN, Associate Editorliiing to ratural justice, legallligent justice, F’resident Right-iCg to stand on.k. president t>f the University oisays. “There should he some pro*e ior the conscientious objector, just asTom BartonNoel B. GersonWilliam BeritmanEDirORIAL ASSISTANTSHoward D. Hudson Howard M. Richi'aMj H. Kutner Florence WishnlckerSlNESS ASSISTANTSWilliam O'Donnell Robtrt SamuelsgOPHOMOUE REPORTERSCharlotte FishmanRaymond LahrRalph NicholsonEdxar Greenebaumanet l.«wyt-an PrussinifRuth Greenebaum;.'urtis Melnickllarker Stanton..'harlcs HotrrDonald Morrialoanne StolteHenry KelleyWilliam WatsonSOPHOMORE BUSINESSASSIST.\NTS jRod Chapin/.almon Goldjmithtierald SternI'>ank DavUE<hvard SchaarEverett StoreyEDITORIAL COMMITTEEMarie Berytr Louise Cra. er Breaton CutlerGeoi^ MannNight Editor: Howard M. RichAssistant: Ralph NicholsonFriday. January 19. 1934A LANTERN THATSHEDS NO LIGHTStriking is the situation where a university ad¬ministration is undeniably wrong and a group ofstudents is undeniably right.Seven Ohio State students vs. President Right-mire and R. O. T. C. advocates present con¬summate perfection of situation for a studentnewspaper.\'et the poor little Ohio State Lantern does notknow what to do about it.It apologizes for inability to find in any col¬lege paper editorials advocating compulsory mil¬itary training. By a peculiar, amusing process ofreasoning, the Lantern arrives at an utterly ori¬ginal conclusion that compulsory military train¬ing must have some merits, since every collegeeditor is against it.To side with something because every collegeeditor is against it has humorous and reasonableaspects, but the Lantern showed no sign of recog¬nizing such subtlety.And so, after spending the fall in a vicious raidafter the scalp of their football coach, The OhioState 1-antern straddled a wobbly fence on thepertinent R. O. T. C. question, raised by sevenstudents who refused to join it.In trying to keep things hot. The Lantern blewluke warm and tepid.The editorial that said the military course wasalmost an extra-curricular activity which shouldbe optional also said that compulsory drill is notanti-social or pro-war.•Again, in the same editorial, a statement ap¬peared that optional drill was favored by thepaper simply because it was nopular, then pro¬ceeded quite seriously to propose a vote to findout whether it was popular or not.The vote was to include faculty, alumni, trus¬tees, and students. The army was entirely omit¬ted. As a true neutral we suggest that The Lan¬tern let the army vote too. After all this is thearmy’s fight.The Lantern evidently does not think either•side IS right and does not much care. They pro¬pose a vote on the matter, but stated that thereferendum idea was an old one, had been triedbefore, and is guaranteed to have no effect what-.si )ever.Leaving The Lantern to find its own way outits Slough of Lnoriginality, we will investigatehow President Rightmire wandered into his Mire.Xf) understand the situation, one must realizethat presidents of state universities are forced tospend m ire time understanding what state legis¬lature want than comprehending the meaning ofeducation, research, and academic freedom.President Rightmire expelled seven of his stu¬dents under the Morill Land Grant Act on thegrounds that the act demanded compulsory mil¬itary training.- --I an int. ii,ent nation makes in wartime.Picsidoiit I riink’s inference regarding the inlelligence i>l Ohio State authorities was apparent.1 he exp<Tled students, of course, have taken arather h'w advantage of a gorgeous opportunitv.\s heir university administration fumes, newspaper headline.s blaze, editorial writers scintillate,and socialist-pacifists become feverish in denunic.i-, tion, those students indulge in much .secret dej light, publicly displayed., They are indisputably, uncon.scionably. un: equivocally, intrinsically right..And still the Ohio State Lantern doe.s not know1 what to do—J. P. B.!• DISCUSSIONSAT DRUCEFifty-six people—student and faculty—areleaving for Druce Lake tomorrow. 1 hey will jspend the week-end in discussion.Fifty-six hundred people will remain on cam¬pus to study for their next examinations if theyare absurdly conscientious.\Vh ich group will progress furthest in their edu¬cation. il progress for two days could be meas¬ured at all?Th ose who discuss, we hold. For they exchangeideas and like it; while those studying for exam¬inations must memorize fact.s and don’t like it —J. P. B.in K s'sf rfi;|The Travelling Bazaarfii BY CHARLES (“Scribleru.”) TYROLER I5 §' P.lOLnr.lCAL SdESCE LECTUREi.•\(lele Sandman gave u.‘4 the material for thisitem, hut she asked us not to mention her name.Se »•(’ H-nn't. We'll say that Phil Werner gave usthe stuff. Adele will like that better, and besidesit wouldn't be right to mention her name aftershe asked u.s not to.The following is a page from the notebook ofa girl in the biological science survey course.Adele.... I mean.... Phil Werner gave it to ns,and we reproduce it here for your amusementand for the girl’s embarrassment.Lecture seven(much, much indecipherable scribbling)My dear Mr. B.—I ju.st love your curly hair, and I think yotihave the cutest mannerisms. Oh, please, dear Mr.B., can’t I join your discussion class, and baskin the sunshine of your smile?(then, convinced that the truth is most effective,the girl wrote the second version)Mr. B.I don’t like you, but I wish you wou'd let mebe in your discussion section because I have aninterest, not in the subject, but in one of your stu¬dents in the section.Thi.s requires no comment except that “Mr.B’’ is Mr. Boyer of the Botany department whomAdele.... I mean.... Phil says is “a cute youngfellow with wavy hair and a lovely smile.”* * *R ROT HERS IN THE BONDIt was over at the Zeta Bete house, and NoelGerson was introducing Julian Levy, a prominentyoung Chicago lawyer and a Z. B. T. alumnus,to the actives in the chapter.“Julian”, said Noel, in his most fraternal man¬ner, “This is Frank Moss. Surely you knowFrank’s sister?”“Nope, can’t say I do.”“Well, then you probabl.v know his father, Mr.Moss?”“Never met him.”“Julian”, said Noel, desperately, “then youmust know his uncle. Mr. Solomon the famousbrewer,”Julian’s face brightened up. “Oh yes I knowSolomon.... in fact I’ve got a fifteen thousanddollar suit against him glad to meet you.Brother Moss.”Editor, Daily Maroon,Dear Mr. Barden:In the M;iro()ii t'ditorial i'f Januaiy17. seveial .stateim nts appearedwhi'.h are deserving id’ correctionshi'cau.se tin y are api'arently based onI'al e assumptions and a lack of ac¬quaintance with certain fields of in¬tellectual pursuit.First, the statement was made;ihoiit the .-at roiiness ami invioiabil-ity of sei(*ntifie facts. We believethat the most superficial examinationj of any scientific journal would liem-: onstratc to the writer of the editorialthat no small part of scientific re-! se:irch is concerned with countlesscorroborations and more often nega-I tions of the fimiings of other woik-ers. Only after a given set of datahas undergone a mo.st rigorous andcritical examination will any aeient-i>t des' rving of the name accept it as) tactual. If the writer is sufficientlyinteresti'd to test the truth of ourstatement, we refer him to any goodhistory of biological or physical sci¬ence.Secondly, the .Maroon writer mis¬understands the purpose of the de-I tailed technical work making up the: body of any science. Facts precedethe concept of the theory. If newor contrary data arc found, the hy¬pothesis is altered. The validity ofa theory is in direct proportion tothe number of facts to which it is.'ifiplicable and il is obvious that theapplicability can only be deterniineilby controlled. cKact experiments.Therefore, from this point of viewthere is a definite justification forany scientific fact.Is it not possible that the truefunction of a university is merelyto dispense fact.s and inculcate acritical atfitmic of mind which a per--on with intellectual stamina will .sub¬sequently u.se in formulating his ownattitude toward life? (?n thi.- pointit se(mis that the editori.-il writer andwe agree, and we recommend to him, the idea that examinations and thenecessary remembering of facts con-' nected with them are after all a mi-, nor detail and a slight pittance toI be rendered in exchange for the pos-I .sibility of future intellectual breadth |j and freedom. jHenry D. LedererLee HacenbushI Sacreilness and inviolability of sci-! entific fact, the editorial .said, wasa modern delusion. Most scientistsand all the public suffer from thedelusion, and those who are so af¬flicted have no business in education.Since the close of the editorial.stated that correlation of fact andtheory is the end of research, it doesnot seem apparent that the writerwas ignorant of the supposed inten¬tion of detailed technical work con- ,nected with any science. IThe function of a university is Inever “merely to dispense facts.” IWe agree that a university shoulddevelop a critical attitude of mindand intellectual stamina—both vir¬tues can be developed only throughiileas and discussion of them. Anyman who becomes both critical andintellectual by attendance at a fact—dispensary is a genius. . .no less. Andin the education of a genius, nothing'matters much.—-ed.The longest run from scrimmage iscredited to Willys Terry, of Yale,who covered IL'i yards against OhioWesleyan in 1884.POLO TEAM PLAYSI CULVER TOMORROW1 The .MaiDon !>olo trio journej■ (Tilvei, Indiana, tomorrow, whei'th()]U‘s to rejieat its previous o'-; u win over the Vedettes.(’oinjilinientary tickets to all p.games to be played at the Chic rRiding clul) may be obtained a' tMilitary office.*02 SuiuaAjj»SIA ,1 unyHU,.'ivw AiivaHHUVM.) UHLS.Ill..IHO. VWOISJO 1BV3H133MS•louinuo^lzz -.Nvr n: '.wrAVQNOW AVQNnSP-'E9 *3 8S83H1V3H102 NVfAvaMnxvslaxaaa61 NVfAVaiHJ.»nl>oj),jix'H mi.4v0^38331 UJUiCS O S.iji'i .mo t J” llMitl '’M) ‘<>,1luauiuiviJaiu^ jo auio)id^ aqij|euoi)esu9§,.0338331S O S,,SI ojnioid i: qanx -.Lnuno,-) sdo.i.ws iusiv>u.r!i:iu•loaqs sp A’q put? pozi.inqnd oiipi pui? pap[t?.i.n(un ituoiB sAuioo a.inptui « ,>|iq.v\ t? ui .^.'luo..3^39331 'S 0 'S,,Has nOA NHH.WS(IV IH H.IOA NO DNKINV.l.S HR HT..1()AHAL KEMPAND HISINTERNATIONAL FAVORITESARE ON THE AIR.Thrilling words aren’t they?.A thousand times more thrilling when you are at theBlackhawk to see and hear them.Join theMIDNIGHT FLYERSwithPIERRE ANDREEvery Monday at MidnightA Complete Floor ShowHeaded byEARL RICKARDMaster of Ceremonies•NORTHWESTERN TALENT TONIGHTDinner $1.25BLACKHAWKWabash at RandolphBUILD I NOS AND GROUNDSIn each of the University parking stations thereare reserved spaces for members of the faculty.These spaces are indicated by small signs withthe name of the holder printed on them.Over near the Physiology building there is aspace reserved for Zileh but at the parkingground to the left of the eltapel there are threenames. ... Filbey, .Stifler and CHRIST!!!Thi.s strikes us as being pretty appropriate.Maybe the B. & G. department ha= a sense ofhumor after all.Where to WorshipTHE FIRST UNITARIANCHURCHWoodlawn Avenue and East 57th StreetOGDEN VOGT, D.D., MinisterSUNDAY. JANUARY 21. 19341 1 :00 A. M.—“Shall We Sacrifice Morality toReligion?" Professor Clayton R.Bowen.4:00 P. M.—^'banning Club Tea. Mr.Newton Jenkins, "Effective PoliticalAction.”HYDE PARK METHODISTCHURCHBlack&tone Ave, and Fifty-Fourth StreetGeorge H. Parkinson, PastorSUNDAY SERVICES. JANUARY 21. 193410:00 A. M.—^Church School.1 1 :00 A. M.—"Young People Take Charge.”Is it the morning or the evening twilightfor Christianity and Democracy? Dr.Parkinson.7:00 P. M.—Young People’s Society, Ep-worth League.A church home with a welcome, a message, and an(pportunity to invest your personality in service.UNIVERSITY CHURCH OFDISCIPLES OF CHRIST5655 University AvenueDr. Edward Scribner Ames, MinisterSUNDAY. JANUARY 21. 193410:30 A. M.—Communion Service.1:90 .A. M.—Sermon Subject: “Modern Preachers: Dr, EdgarDe W itt Jones. ” Dr. Ames.6:00 P. M.—Whanglers. Tea. Program. “Capitalism vs. Social¬ism. ” Debate between Mr. Barton Hunter and Mr. HomerDeadman.The Church ofThe Redeemer(EPISCOPAL)56th and BlackstoneRev. E. S. WhiteEpiscopal Student PastorSUNDAY SERVICESHoly Communion, 8:00 and9:30 A. M.Choral Eucharist, 11:00 A. M.Evensong, 5:00 P. M.Three services every week-day.Church open daily for p^'ayer andmeditation.THE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. jAS'jAyPLAN INTRAMURALTRACK MEET FORFEBRUARY 7, 8An all-Univer.sity winter intra-nuiral indoor track meet is scheduledfor Wednesday and Thursday, h'eh-ruary 7 and 8, according to Walterilebert, faculty Intramural manajjer.Ml entries must be in the IntramuralI'trice by I'>iday, February 2.This competition is open to fra¬ternity, independent, and dormitory ■teams without discrimination.Included in the program of events 'uill be: 50, 100, and 220 yard dashes; ,110 and 880 yard, and one mile runs; |120 yard low hurdles; high jump; !: hot put; broad jump; and 880 yard :relay for a four man team. jThe winter track meet this season ■-upplant.s the intramural Carnival ofprevious years. Preliminaries will be irun Wednesday, and finals Thursdayin Bartlett.JOHN STOCKSTRAVEL BUREAUHeadquarters—PressBuildingHours—10-12:30 A. M.I :30-4 P. M.lei. Mid. 0800—Loc. 118STEAMSHIPRAILROADAIR LINESBUSTours« Itineraries,TicketsNo Service ChargeCagers Out forRevenge AgainstBig, Bad WolvesRevenge for the overwhelming de¬feat handed them at Michigan will bethe' impetus behind the Maroons’ at¬tack when they face the Wolverinesin the tieldhouse tomorrow night. De¬spite their setback, the Chicagoanshave an excellent chance of achiev¬ing their first conference victory ofthe .season.Neither quintet has exhibited muchstrength in the games played thusfar. Michigan has lost to Indiana,Wisconsin, and Northwestern, whilewinning from the Maroons. OhioState and Illinois, in addition toMichigan, have conquered Chicago.Nels Norgren’s men showed im¬provement in the Illini game overtheir form in pre.-ious tilts. Theirdefensive play was much better, andin the second half their offense wasstrong enough to overcome an eightpoint lead. Practice sessions thisweek were mainly devoted to .scrim¬mages among the varsity players withthe aim of developing a powerfulattack against Michigan.Wolves ErralirThe Wolverines’ chief difficultyhas been the erratic shooting of theforwards. Allen and Rudness willprobably start at the forward posi¬tions; .lablonski will be at center, andCaptain Petoskey and Tessmer willplay guards. Allen and .lablonskihave been the outfit’s best scorersthis year.Tommy Flinn, who was slated tostart at forward, sutfered a charleyhorse in practice Wednesday, and asa result, may not play. In the eventthat Flinn does not start, his placewill be taken by Bob Pyle. Bob is abetter shot than Tommy, but Flinn’s"uarding ability‘is needed by theteam.The other men who will play to¬morrow are Haarlow at forward, Pe¬terson at center, and Lang and Op-penheim at the guards.. . COURTESY STUDENT-ARTIST PASS . .experimentalThe CUBE218 South Wabash AvenueOn the Fourth FloorSAT.—JAN. 20th—8:20 p. m.Distinguished Actor—DiseurWALTON PYRE“FRANSCESCA da RIMINI”ART THEATREChicago’s OwnTheatrical WorkshopSUN.—JAN. 21«l—8:20 p. m.Sensational—ANDREYEV’SWALTZ of the DOjpSGreatest Russian Play xBalcony—.50c Main Floor—75cPhone for ReservationsSWIMMERS DEFEATLOYOLA, 4341, INSEASON OPENER HEREMaroon tankmen won a hard-fought swimming meet last t, ightfrom Loyola univer.'iity, 12 to 41, toopen the 19.34 season. Max Briden-thal of Loyola, former Lake Shoreathletic club star, turned in the best])erforniance of the evening, whenlie won the 200-yard breast .stroke in2:34.9—only four seconds over theintercollegiate record time for theevent.A 400-yar(l medley relay openedthe meet w'ith the Maroon team ofJohn Barden, Lonnie Levi, A1 Sachs,and Phil Stein winning a close racefrom tho Loyolans. In the backstroke. George Niooll and Don Bell-strom took first and second placeseasily, while Barden turned in a firstin the short OO-yard swim. Jim El-well, Loyola champ, then, was vic¬torious in the long 440-yard eventwith “Babe” B'ush coming up frombehind to take second place. By win¬ning more than 98 iioiats and easilycapturing seven out of the ten re¬quired dives. John Roberts talliedfive more points for the Maroons withNick Kearns of Loyola taking secondpi le. In the next event, the 220-yard swim, Elwell of the Orange andRed was pushed all the way by Bushand Stein, hut he managed to win in2:.37.2. Ending with the medley re¬lay in which Loyola was victorious,the meet proved that the Maroonsneed a great deal of practice beforethey enter their first conference meeton February 3 when they engage Wis¬consin in Bartlett pool.Water Polo Team Loses! The water polo team, consisting ofj Captain Nahser, Bellstrom, Will, Sto-i lar. Bush, Stein, Nicoll, and a num¬ber of substitutes, met an Illinoisj athletic club group made up of form-I er Olympic stars in a fast game inI which the Maroons .showed decidedstrength and teamwork. With oneMaroon goal disputed, the officialscore was announced as 7-4. Whenall parts of the Maroon play are tak¬en into consideration, the team show¬ed much improvement over that oflast year and will probably be in tip-lop shape for the conference openerwith Wisconsin.Chess l^eam Losesto ‘Y*; Tournament ,Registration Opens'"The University chess team lo.st itsfirst meet of the quarter Tuesday iTiight to the Irving Park “Y” team, 7 iI to 1. Dave Blumenstock was the only]\Lnoon player to win his malch. The inext match of the team will bo •; against the Chicago Chess and BridgeI club on January 3(i.' Rcgi.stration for the annual Rey-I Holds club round robin chess tourna-I ment, which begins January 30, will Ij close Tuesday at 5. GfTicial Reynolds Iclub awards of gold and silver med- I! als will be presented to the winners.r.after‘s trJEN TACKLE , ''NG HOOSIER I MM TOMORROW "wrestinatmen, in fine shape' 1 8 tie with Illinois. 1 Caxndi- , ,Megi' ; 1,oniorrow a Blooi., ‘le showin.r;’ of his’ Coach S. K. Vor-'• ab(iut Maroon>ach Thom’s cham-mcet, will faceind National Ctheir ojana’s li'i,ale chanington. Aiteam last Satres is -optiiuchances againstpion Hoosiers. ’Max Bernstein, kept out of theIllinois, meet becat^e of a boil on ibis neck, will probably wrestle at 118 • Wellesleypounds, with either Barton or Hauser when a male stat 120 [)oiri(is. Indian.a’s 120-pound- art class.earnspeedy iFactor isberth, witl.filling the h<.o-edin anll'im 11 ■ ■ L I ■ I II HiTHE STORE FOR MENri 11 IIImrv'\SchlitzatBedtimeinduces sound, restfulsleep. It soothes thenerves—it is health¬ful. It cannot causeindigestion.The Beer That Made MilwaukeeFans Attend I~MBasketball Games;See Wierd SightsThough five basketball games werescheduled for last night’s Intramuralcompetition, one football game, onelop-sided conte.st which resembled thecage sport, and two fairly evenbasketball games were actually onview in Bartlott gym. The fifth con¬flict was forfeited to the Phi Kapswhen most of the D. U. team wastardy in showing up.In one of the wildest and rough¬est games ever played on the Intra¬mural courts, a makeshift Deke sec¬ond five, including “Tarzan” Deem,tackled, blocked, and charged in amanner most pleasing to CoachShaughnessy; yet were unable toscore more than 6 points while thePhi Psi seconds, led by Harry Mor¬rison, tallied 20. One of the high¬lights was a shot at the wrong bask¬et by Ben Mann.Psi U. Runt WildShowing exceptional ability for aB team, the Psi U outfit held the S.A. E.’s sdorelcss during the secondhalf while they counted 23 markers.The official scorer credited the Uni¬versity avenue lads with 35 pointsfor the evening, while Sigma AlphaEpsilon scored four, all of them byBaker. Dix, with 12 points, was highscorer foi the winners, and prob¬ably the most important cog in theirvictory.Led by George Novak, the AlphaSigs handily outclassed the S. A. E,first team, 27 to 16, in one of themore interesting contests. Eventhough the victors held a two pointload at the- half, they clearly showedtneir superiority near the end of thegame as fewer setups were missedand better teamwork came about..\ li'jt minute rally by the Disciplesclimaxed their 25 to 21 win over theSpartans in the closest, though dull-e.^t game of the four. McDiarmidscored all but six of the Disciples’points and played a good all-aroundgame.WRESTLING TOURNEYCopyri#bt#d. Jm. SchlitK Co., Itt4The sixth wrestling championship |tournament will be held at the field-house January 25, 26, and 27, it wasannounced yesterday by S. K. Vorres,Maroon wrestling coach. Entries forthe meet will close January 22.Just Because Ifs Over for the Clubs-Don’t think for a minute you’re ever going to sew up that gorgeous little blondrushee that you’ve been working on in Psychology, unless you get on the wellknown ball and, incidently, unless you discontinue coming to class in that arrayof archaic tatters that you call a suit. Yes, indeed, young man, you can’t start rest¬ing on the oars or you’ll find the old cause dying on the sack. Now is the timefor action. Time, we would say, to swing into that campaign of intensive mid¬winter rushing if you expect to find yourself, ”in there pitching ball” along abouttime for the Prom and that very special winter formal. You well know,of course, what a new suit from Field’s can do in the way of building up moraleto help you in your effort to tear down sales resistance. Take for instance thesebeautiful new suits selling at $36.50. Can’t you just see the look of awe one ofthem would bring to the eyes of a heretofore indifferent little club girl? They arereal values, too. You’ll find plaids, checks, stripes, and solid colors in all thelatest shades and fabrics. The offering includes double and single breasted Drapes!with the new plaited trousers or double and single breasted models, if you pre-!fer. Remember this is not a clearance, but merchandise purchased especially forthis sale.THE STORE FOR MENMARSHALL FIELD& COMPANYJJ4UUU.AJ.1 ^AaROON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1934tort i? niaiio to in^vivt- hisi ijvacy. anti tho authors si“it‘ any nu'inbor of tho aiJoio-t th<* sliirhlost erro^<phero or historical data,would be greatly obliged• lease keep his mouth sh?'.nsvouldut it.”Wa \-roisereawayand CsensicaThe .at the tuno have: monthsjal comedylorses" withmpletely mad."musical run-Russell Crousewith many non-by doe l^ook.d in New York Citye century. Evevv ef-he plot concerns aToe. who. throu, of the .ii'ods o'and because he canponent. i.s electedS ork. From thenters around a suln. Broad-nterven-1 comedylor his op-yor of Newhe action cen-fianchise whichJoe. ‘‘the hoise’.- f/'end" wants toveto.But the plot i- of importance onlyas a line on wh'ch to hang the gags.Cook is known as the lightning com¬edian. but "Hold Your Hoises” i.-faster than r three-ring circus. Yousimply car. t stop laughing longenough to catch all the gags.SPECIAL Offer-PMlco RADIOS*1= down per weekEXPERT REPAIR SERVICEOpen Evenings Until 10A. J. F. LOWE & SON1217 E. 55th St.mmmmmmmHBm.Toe himeslf does everything. Hesings .dances, .juggles a barrel on hisfeet—and never misses a trick. He’sa master showman, for he even suc¬ceeds in making hilariously funnystunts which would ordinarily noteven be amusing, as for instance his‘‘exjilanation of tho ballet” in thefirst act. and the utterly meaninglessprimer story (from a real primer)he reads (o the audience and assort¬ed irate tax-payers, in the second act.Have Chasen is a riot as B‘roadwayJoe’s body-guard. He wears more ab¬surd costumes and takes more pun¬ishment—anything for a laugh. TomI’atricola is effective a.s Kid Hogan,but we would like to have seen moredances by him. Horothy Dare whoperforms with him is very easy onihe eye anti also sin.gs and dancespleasingly. June O’Dea is adequateand ornamental in the leading fem¬inine role, and .'he is ably assisted byJi rry Norris as .Man Donovan.Harriet Iloctor, who bids fair torank as one of .America's finest dansouses, is miraculously graceful andwholly enchanting in the two—andall too few—'ballet numbor.< in the. (low. 'I’he flea cii cus ballet is oneof the clevere.st, and at the .samelime, one of the most effectivelystaged dance creations we have everseen.‘‘Hold A*our Horses” is scheduledto stay in Chicago for only threeweeks. We predict a sell-out for the1 11 11. and disappointment for the mu-sical-comedv fans who fail to see it.STOCKS OPENS NEWTRAVELERS’ BUREAUJust back from a trip around thewoild whicn included South Africaand South America. John Stocks hasopined u travel bureau on the cam¬pus. with headquarters in the Pi esslUiilding. Until June. ItMIT. Mr.Ntucks was manager of the travelbureau of the First National Bankof Cliicago. a post he held for fiveyears. Prior to that he was tourmanager and eruise conductor for oneof the large tour companies and intnat capacity made four trips around(he world besides inmiiiurable short-t; tours ami cruiseMr. Stocks!s thus prepared to advise on alltravel matters and holds the ageiieiester ail steamship, air. motor eoaeh.and tour companies.Today on theOnadranj|icsNightHowardKellev,The Daily MarooitEditor for the nextHudson. .Assistant:issue:Henry“S. O. S. Iceberg” IsFeatured at DrexelToday and TomorrowKimbark HotelRates $5.50 Up24 HOUR SERVICE1 05 RoomsNewly decorated with private baths, tubsand showers6324 Kimbark Ave.Phone Plaza 4500:OLLEGE INN FLOORSHOW WILL HONORFOUR FRATERNITIES iThe College Inn tonight will fea-!ture an all-Chicago floor show in aCollege night honoring four fratern-'ities from the Chicago campus. The jfraternities to be Imr.ored are Psi U,Deke, Phi Psi. and .Alpha Delt.The Inn has for several months inthe past been featuring eollegc nightswithout any particular reference tofraternity. Tonight's show will fea¬ture Marshall Zeman. a clever dia-ilectician. Irving Harris and JoelHerron at two pianos. Fiances Hel¬ler. a very talented and clever youngdancer, and Noinuin Masterson. bluessinger.Cniversal's screen saga of the arc¬tic. ‘‘S. O. S. Iceberg.” has been book-C(i for the Drexel theater. SAS E. (')3rd'treet. for T'riday and Saturday.Movie goers jaded with sophisticatedfare out of Hollywood are offeredsights and sounds of fhc polar regionsas background to a swift-moving'irama of adventure and undauntedlove.The filming of the picture wasfraught with hazards. Universal sentan expedition, composed of 3S actors,technicians, and scientists, into north-.un (treeland, only 15 ilegrees fromthe north pole. For six months thecompany fought cold, e.xposure. andliardships in an effort to capture au¬thentic shots for a story of a lostexpedition. Dr. Arnold Fanck. lead¬er of the expedition, required theaid of Knud Kasnui.s.sen. noted Dan¬ish explorer.The equipment for the e.xpeditionincluded motor sledges, motor boats,an enormous stock of provisions,three Junker airplanes, and portableelfctric devices designed against theextreme cold to insure sound record¬ing of arctic phenomina never beforebrought to the screen.M usic and ReligionJoseph Bond chapel. ProfessorEastman, Chicago Theological Sem¬inary. at 12.Phonograph Concert, Social Sci¬ence Assembly hall, at 12:30.Lectures‘‘Intellectual Hi'tory of WesternEurope. Roman Rhetoric and RomanLaw." •As'^ociate Professor MortimerJ. Adler. Social .Science 122. at 3:30.“Theory of the Cell.” ProfessorCeorge Link. Harper M 11. at 4:45.“Kinetic Theory of (lases.” Dr.Beardsley. Eullerton Hall, the Art Institute, at (>:4r).“Conquest of Mount Everest in.April 1933,” .Air Commander P. F.M. Fellowes. Leon Mandel hall, at8 :30.“Economic Relation between Unit¬ed States. Russia and Poland,’’ Wal-ery Starezewski. Slavonic Club. In¬ternational House, Room .A, at 8.MiscellaneousW. .A. A. Cozy, A’. W. C. .A. room,Ida Noyes hall, at 3:30.Ida Noyes Open House. Ida Noyeshall. 8 to 12.“End of St. Petersburg,” SovietFilm. Social Science .Assembly hall,at 8:30.SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1934MiscellaneousUniversity Basketball Game. Chi¬cago vs. Michigan. Fieldhouse, at 8.h'reshman Class Dance. Ida Noyestheater, 9 to 12.SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 1934Music and ReligionUniversity Chapel. Kirtley F. Math¬er Ph. D., Profes.sor of Geology, !Harvard University, at 11.Carillon Recital. Harold Simonds.Carilloneur. University Chapel, at3:30.1 iJoin Smart ChicagoTonightin theJoseph Urban RoomSPEND WHATYOU PLEASE!For a thrilling night inthe worl(d’s most daz¬zling Supper-Club.NOCOVER ORMinimum ChargeExcept SaturdayEnjoy the scintillatingUrban atmosphere—sophisticated enter-tainment superbdance music andPAY ONLY FORWHAT YOU ORDER!Special Supper. . . .$1CARLOS MOLINAThe Aristocrat of BandsCongress Hoteleaves areusediinAlways the Finest TobaccoLo^ynsht. 1^34, Tu« Aineflcftii Tobacco C'jmpaayLuckiesFor these a/e t/ie Mildestandfillip ripened firpe fix^t smokinpWe buy only the center leaves for Luckies.Not the top leaves for tiiey are under-devel¬oped. Not the bottom leaves for they areinferior in quality. Only the center leavesfor these are truly mild and fully ripe. Andthat’s the fine tobacco we use—to makeLuckies so round, so firm, so fully packed—free from loose ends that spill out. That’swhy Luckies are always mild, always trulymild. And remember, “It’s toasted”—for throat protection — for finer taste.Lucky Strike presents the Metropolitan Opera CompanySaturday at 2 P. M., Eastern Strike presents the MetropolitanStandard Time, over Red and Opera Company in the completeBlue Networks of NBC, Lucky opera “DON GIOVANNI”.and only the Center LeavesIMPERFECT IN ORIGINAL IA,