UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1932Price Five Cent^Vol. 32. No. 54.frank J. LOESCH TOaddress guests atLAW SCHOOL DINNERINJUDSONIHURSDAYDean Bigelow Talks onStudy of EuropeanMandates1000 ALUMNI INVITEDFrank J. Loesch, prominent Chi-(ajrt) attorney and public official,will be pTuest speaker at a L41Wschool dinner next Thursday evening,in Judson court dining room. Onethou.sand alumni of this professionalschool have been invited to attendthe- dinner, and all present Law stu¬dents may obtain tickets from mem-hers of the Law school council for$1.Marry A. Bigelow, dean of thel.aw .school, is the .second speaker.The dinner is being held in lieu ofthe annual .smoker at which alumniand .students of the school becomeacquainted each year. Dean Big¬elow stated yesterday, “We have alatye, loyal body of alumni, andmake an important occasion of thisannual opportunity for students tohear and meet men who are engagedin active practice.”Legal Anecdetea.Mr. lyoesch has selected for histopic, “.Anecdotes from a Lawyer’sLife.” He will draw upon his ex¬periences as president of the Chicago |('rime Commission, member of the IWickersham committee on Law En-1foRcement, his personal inveetiga- jtions of the 1926 election fraud in('hicago, and his work as assistantstate’s attorney in the Sanitary dis¬trict investigation. Mr. Loesch hasbeen a member of the Chicago barsince 1874, and has been granteda Doctor’s degree from the Univer¬sity, as well as one from three other 1institutions.His recent visit to Africa for thepurpose of studying the Europeanmandates there will be the subject<»i Dean Bigelow’’s address. The di¬rector of the Law school left Chi¬cago in December, 1930, and forfour months travelled throughAfrica, “combining vacation and.'^tudy.” He will recount the story ofthis experience at the dinner Thur.s- ^day evening. jCouncil Sells TicketsBouton McDougal, chairman ofthe I.aw school council. Is In chargeof the sale of tickets for the din-'ici. .Members of the council from"hoin students may \obtain ticketsare Sam Jacobson, Bruce Parkhill,Bernard Cahn, Harold Hernley, A.A. Ribicoff, Merwin Rosenberg,Joe MacKoff, and Fred Merrifield.1 hese men represent the Freshman,Junior and Senior classes of theS'chool, and were elected in Novem-her to administer matters of com-nion interest to all membersol the school. This dinner is thehist such affair to be sponsored.BLAKE HALL SELECTSNEW HOUSE OFFICERSDccupants of Blake, the recent-> converted” dormitory for wom-'0. have .selected twenty-one newouse members to participate in so-(lal activities for the quarter. Eligi-'t> for membership requires atone quarter’s residence in the'Oil, after which the girl is votedupon.I'he officers for the present term' Margaret Schmidt, president;uiy Mawicke, vice-president; An-Baker, secretary; Helen Kolb,'usurer. The first event uponschedule this winter is aSunday, Jan-24, from 4 until 7.I-F Council WillTakeNo Action on•Hell Week^AnticsWith twenty-eight fratwnities onthe campus planning initiation cer¬emonies for freshmen during thenext two weeks, stimulus from twosources was given yesterday to theannual activity. William E. Scott,assistant Dean of students, statedthat no freshman would be declaredineligible for initiation because ofschola.stic deficiencies, and CharlesSchmidt, president of the Interfrat¬ernity council, announed that thisbody would take no ation of anysort to regulate “hell week” anticsof the chapters.“Nothing to Say.”’When questioned by a Daily Ma¬roon reporter, Schmidt declared,“The council has nothing to say onthe question of ‘hell week.’ No at¬tempt will be made to regulate itin any way.” Canvassing the major¬ity of the fraternities. The DailyMaroon discovered that many 'arethemselves abolishing the traditionalweek of hazing. Several othershave shortened th^ period to one ortwo days; only five or six continuethe practice for the entire week. Thereporter who made the survey, re¬ceived, however, numerous evasiveanswers expressing an apparent ig¬norance of the subject.Last year, Chauncey S. Boucher,then dean of the department ofArts, Literature and Science and incharge of student relations for theUniversity, requested that the In¬terfraternity council “take stepstoward the limitation and reg;ula-tion of ‘hell week’,” saying that ifthe council did not dispose of theproblem. University authoritieswould take a hand.Last Year’s ActionThe counciFs response to this ul¬timatum was the adoption of a reso¬lution to the effect that, “Hereafter,all exhibitions and stunts of the so-called probationary week shall beconfined within the chapter house it¬self, and nothing shall be requiredof a pledge that will interfere withhis schola.stic obligations, or whichcan cause him physical injury, orwhich will tend to diminish his .self-respect.”An editorial in The Daily Maroonthe next day scored the council forits “naive” action, stating that,“the resolution was strikingly sim¬ple and eminently silly, being but aconsciously cunning method of do¬ing practically nothing nicely.”The University administration,however, made no further commentabout the matter, and this resolutionserved as the desired regulation la.styear.International HouseTo Open October 1The new International House,which is two months ahead of itsconstruction schedule, will he readyfor partial occupancy at the begin¬ning of the summer quarter, andwill be in complete operation byOctober 1, Dr. Charles W. Gilkey,chairman of the committee on or¬ganizations, said yesterday.The committee on organizationsfor International House is present¬ing its recommendations to theBoard of Trustees at its Januarymeeting. In addition to its chair¬man, Dean Charles W. Gilkey, themembers of this committee are Dr.J. P. Simonds of the NorthwesternMedical School; President E. C. Jen¬kins of the Y. M. C. A. College;Mrs. Quincy Wright, representingthe University community; Mr. Em¬ery T. Filbey, assistant to the Presi¬dent; Mr. James M, Stifler, memberof the Board of Trustees; DeanGeorge A. Works, University Exam¬iner; and George O. Fairweather,assistant business manager of theUniversity.The paid membership of the In¬ternational Students Association hasreached 468, approximately one-fourth of which are United Statescitizens.ACTIVITY HEADS FIND CLASS OF1935 MORE EAGER, AMBITIOUSHeads of campus activities werepractically unanimous yesterday inawarding the palm to the class of1935 for industry, ambition, andinterest in all extra-curricular af¬fairs, while department of athleticsauthorities found the freshmensomewhat less intei'ested in athleticsthan was the class of 1934.The concensus of opinion has itthat, although the fre.shmen com¬plain of overwork and little timefor activities under the University’snew educational opportunity, theyevince more aptitude and moreverve. Some attributed this to“higher admission standards thanlast year”.Gil White, editor of the Cap andGown, campus annual, and presidentof the Dramatic asSociation, disclos¬ed these facts: Twenty-four fresh¬men are candidates for the stal.' ofthe year book, as compared withonly fourteen in 1931. The presentcrop is “much more capable” thanlast year’s.Out of 145 who tried out forparts in the Freshman plays, andfor membership in the association,45 are to be admitted, a greaternumber than last year.Frank Hurburt 0’Hai‘a, directorof dramatic productions, estimatedthe increase in freshmen aandiaatesat about twenty percent. He foundtheir general spirit better, but “nomore than is to be expected in thenatural increase of popularity of theorganization.” 'Mirror Attracts MoreGeraldine Smithwick, a memberof Mirror, estimated that sixty per¬cent more freshmen tried out forf the cast' and chorus this year thanlast. She observed improvement inwill-to-work and general attitude.Eighty freshman women aspired toMirror positions this year, as com¬pared with fifty last year.James MacMahon, business man¬ager of the Phoenix, reported thenumber of candidates had doubledthis year, with about forty fresh¬men on the staff, of whom sevenare in the business department.John Kennan, Vocational Guid¬ance advisor, testified to the self-supporting proclivities of the classof 1936. More than 300 have reg¬istered for employment already thisyear, as compared to about 500 forthe whole of 1930-1931. The mark¬ed increase in the number of ap¬plications may indicate either thattimes are harder, or that the fresh¬men possess m|ore initiative, Mr.Kennan said.Better I-hf TalentFreshman candidates for *Intra-mural managerships remained prac¬tically the same, numerically, as lastyear, but improved considerably inability, according to thfe department.Last year thirty five applied for po¬sitions, and this year there arej thirty-six.F'reshman women entering Y. W.C. A. activities seem to be mareenthusiastic, more willing to workand more capable than last year’sfreshmen, Elizabeth Merriam, pres¬ident, averred. She •attributed theincrease in numbers and ability tothe new system and the realizationthat their work is more importantthis year because of the depression.Louis Ridenour, editor 'of TheDaily Maroon, noted a fifty percent(Continued on paga 3)WRIGHT SPEAKSON PALESTINIANLEGAL QUESTION'■ Quincy Wright, professor of in¬ternational relations, discussed thepolitical, economic, and religiousquestions in Palestine in his talk onthe “Legal Aspects of the PalestineMandate” at a meeting of the Avuk-ah club yesterday at 3:80 in Class¬ics 18.The first difficulty in Palestinearises in the, conflict between theBalfour declaration, issued by LordBalfour and promising the Jews ahome land in '^^lestine, and theMandate of the League of Nations,which aims at the eventual inde¬pendence of the mandatory areas. Ifa legislature was formed in Pales¬tine, which would be the first steptoward the independence of thecountry, the Arabs who would be inthe majority would stop all Jewishimmigration into Palestine.The religious problems in Pales¬tine arise from the fact that theJews, Christians, and Arabs haveshrines in this country the birth¬place of all three religions. TheArabs feel that since their religion! is the most recent they are the trueguardians of the shrines, and there¬fore should be in control in thecountry.The fourth interest in Palestine,the English, have tried to settle' these problems in a manner whichj will best maintain peace in thej country, and best promote the eco¬nomic interests of the people.UBRARIANS HAVE TEAPOISTER OFFERSVESPER PROGRAMOF ORGAN MUSICArthur W. Poister, professor oforgan at the University of Redlands,Redlands, California, will play at theUniversity Chapel Tnusieal serviceSun^jay at 4:30.A graduate of the Attierican con¬servatory, Mr. Poister has studiedpiano with Joseph Lhevinne, organwith Wilhelm Middleschulte, andtheory with Leo Sowerby and OlafAndersen. For two years, he stud-died organ, improvisation, composi¬tion, and orchestration- with MarcelDupre, professor of organ at theConservatory of Paris and has serv¬ed as professor of organ at the Uni¬versity of Redlands since 1928.Professor Poister has recentlybeen honored by request programsbefore the National Association ofOrganists and the American Guildof Organists. On December 10, hegave the premiere performance ofan original composition: for the or¬gan, the Choral Symphony in D Mi¬nor with Symphony Orthestra inthe Memorial Chapel of the Univer¬sity of Redlands.His recital Sunday is a part of hissecond annual tour. The itinerarybegan with a performance on Janu¬ary 14 at Sioux City, Iowa, and willinclude Hope College, the 'Univer¬sity of Michigan, Trinity cathedral,Cleveland; Christ Qincin-nati; 'Capital University at Colum¬bus, Ohio; and Waham|.lt^r audi¬torium in New York city. ^ (cCLASS HEARS Speaker“Grey Towers” which usuallycarries a' pedagogical connotation,means recreation and tea to all li¬brarians and employees in the of¬fices of Harper library. This socialclub has been in existence for tenyears, holding annual meetings inNovember, when officers are elect¬ed.Miss Margaret MacGregor, secre¬tary in the Geology Department, isthe current president. Tea is servedevery afternoon at 4 for membersonly.Mr. Clifton T. Fadflnaiil'^bf thepublishing firm of Simotl and Schus¬ter, and literary critic, (tf the Na¬tion, was the guest speaker ,in Presi¬dent Robert M. Hutchins’ honorscourse last Wednesday.*^ Thte day ofthe class was changed from ^Tuesdayto Wednesday so that ProfessorMortimer J. Adler coiitA hHn^ a lit¬erary critic to addresh' thfe <ela*s.The Freshman En^ljah ^plgcementtests which were given to membersof the class are now "'being gracedby the University examiners.P^olted EconomistsGive Lectures atHarris FoundationFour economists of internationalnote have been chosen to give thepublic lectures in the ninth instituteof the Norman Waite Harris Mem¬orial Foundation for the study ofinternational relations. The Found¬ation will hold public meetings inMandel hall and private round tab¬le discussions in various buildingson campus fi’om January 27 to Jan¬uary 31.The subject of the instituW Is“Gold and Monetary Stabilization,”one of the vital problems of inter¬national economic relations.Viner First SpeakerJacob Viner, ffi-ofessor of eco¬nomics at the University and a for¬mer .special expert for the UnitedStates Tariff Commission and theUnited States Shipping Board, willgive the first lecture of the serieson January 27. His subject is: “TheBalance of International Paymentsand the Gold Standard.”The second lecture, to be deliv¬ered on January 28, is “Federal Re¬serve Policy in the Depression.” H.Parker Willis, professor of bankingat Columbia university and formerdirector of research for the FederalReserve Board, will be the speaker.The noted German economist, Gott¬fried Haberler, privadocent of theUniversity of Vienna and a visitingprofessor at Harvard university,will speak on “Gold and the Busi¬ness Cycle” at the January 29 meet¬ing.Lionel D. Edie, economist for theInvestment Research Corporationand author of the book “The Banksand Prosperity,” will give the fourthand final public lecture on January30. His subject will be “The Futureof the Gold Standard.”Many Expert* to AssembleMany experts from ail over thecountry will participate in the seriesof round table discussions. Amongthose who have accepted invitations'lo attend the round table confer¬ences are: Irving Fisher of YaleUniversity; Herbert Feis, economicadviser for the Department ofState; Kelsey Gardener and WinfieldRiefler of the Federal Reserve ad¬visory board; Harold L. Reed ofColumbia university; Harold G.Mouton, president of the BrookingsFoundation; Charles 0. Hary, mem¬ber of the research sTaff of the In¬stitute of Economics; and CarlSnyder of the Federal Reserve Bankof New York.Rare Indian BookCollection CompletedThe completion of the Curtii In¬dian collection and the addition of anew book from the Limited Editionclub were announced yesterday bythe directors of the Rare book roomin Harper library.The Curtis Indian collection is aset of manuscripts valued at eigh¬teen hundred dollars, which havebeen contributed to the Rare bookcollection by the North AmericanIndian society. It is comprised oftwenty volumes and twenty port¬folios. A few of the Indian por¬traits which it contains are now be¬ing exhibited in the show case atthe entrance of the reading roomon the third floor of Harper,The University is a member (Tthe Limited Edition club, and re¬ceives additions to its rare book col¬lection from this source at periodicintervals. This membership is a giftof Dr. -Fred T. Rogers. The editionof the club which has just been re¬ceived is a re-print of a famou:^ oldEnglish novel based on the life ofan opium addict. The editions ofthe club are printed on presses not¬ed for the delicacy of their work.This last book was published at the.Shakespeare Head Press, 53 SaintAldated, Oxford.FRIDAY, FEBRUARY19, SELEaED ASDATE FOR ANNUALWASHINGTON PROMCouncil Will AnnounceOrchestra, BallroomNext WeekISSUE TICKETS SOONFriday evening, February 19, hasbeen selected as the date of thetwenty-eighth annual WashingtonProm.Traditionally held on the eve ofWashington’s birthday, the 1932prom will precede this occasion byseveral days, for the national holi¬day is on Monday this year. Fri¬day was selected in preference toSaturday night because of its great¬er convenience for most students,and because it makes possible thesecuring of better hotel and orches¬tra facilities for the affair, accord¬ing to Warren E. Thompson, busi¬ness manager.Orchestra Not Yet ChosenSelection of the orchestra thatwill play for the prom and determ¬ination of the place in which it willbe held are both to be consummatedthis week-end. The choices will beannounced in The Daily Maroonnext week. The prom manager isbeing assisted in the investigration ofall possible alternatives by a com¬mittee comprised of Edgar Gold¬smith, Zeta Beta Tau; John Mills,Delta Upsilon; and Rube Frodin, PniKappa Psi. When tickets for theprom are printed and placed onsale approximately January 20,Robert Balsley, Delta Kappa Ep¬silon, will supervise their distribu¬tion. A staff of campus men fromfraternities and dormitories will sellthe bids.“Until the scene and orchestra forthe prom are determined, it is im-possible to establish the price ofthis year’s bids,” the committeemembers commented yesterday.“Realizing that the prices must becommensurate with the economicspirit of the times, we are resolvedthat .students attending this promshall have the finest of orchestras,as well as a suitable supper, at thelowest possible price.”$6 Last YearLast year, the price of bids was$6, the prom being held at theSouth Shore Country Club with BillDonaghue’s orchestra furnishing themusic.. Refreshments consisting ofice-cream, cake and coffee, .were.served. The 1930 prom bids cost$7.75, a regular dinner having beenincluded on that occasion. .f , . ^The Undergraduate council issponsor of this annual formal eachyear. At its meeting next Tuesdayevening, the body will consider fintffarrangements for the event, as pre¬sented by the committee, and re¬lease the information to the cam¬pus. The council members electedthe business manager for the promand the four seniors who will leadits grand march.POPE TO SPEAK ONPERSIAN ART TONIGHTArthur Upham Pope, director ofthe American Institute of PersianArt and Archaeology, will presentan illustrated lecture on “GeneralPrinciples of Persian Art” tonightat 8:30 in the auditorium of theOriental Institute. The lecture wijbe under the auspices of the Renais¬sance society.Mr. Pope was director of the In¬ternational Exhibition of PersianArt shown in London last year andis a buyer of Persian art objects forthe Chicago Art Institute. He is nowpublishing a volume entitled “ASurvey of Persian Art,” an elabor¬ation of another book.Page TwoTHE DAILY MAROON. FRIDAY. JANUARY 15. 1932iatlg ifflaro0nFOUNDED IH 1901THE OFFICIAL STUDENT’ NEWSPAPER OF THEUNIVERSITY OF CHICAGOPublished mornings, except Saturday, Sunday and Monday,during the Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters by The DailyMaroon Company, 58,31 University Ave. Subscription rates $3.00per year: by mail, $1.50 per year extra. Single copies, flve-centseach.No responsibility is assumed by the University of Chicago forany statements appearing in The Daily Maroon, or for anycontracts entered into by The Daily Maroon.Entered as second class matter March 13, 1903, at the postoffice at Chicago, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves all right of publicationof any material appearing in this paper.Member of the Western Conference Press AssociationLOUIS N. RIDENOUR, JR., Editor-in-Chi^MERWIN S. ROSENBERG, Business ManagerMARGARET EGAN, Senior EditorJANE KESNER, Senior EditorHERBERT H. JOSEPH, Jr., Sports EditorASSOCIATE EDITORSMAXINE CREVISTONRUBE S. FRODIN. JR.BION B. HOWARDJ. BAYARD POOLEJAMES F. SIMONWARREN E. THOMPSONELEANOR E. WILSONBUSINESS ASSOCIATES.lOHN D. CLANCY, JR.EDGAR L. GOLDSMITHSOPHOMORE ASSISTANTSWM. A. KAUFMANWALTER MONTGOMERYVINCENT NEWMANEDWARD SCHALLERRICHARD J. YOUNGSOPHOMORE EDITORSJANE BIESENTHAI.MELVIN GOLDMANWILLIAM GOODSTEINEDWARD NICHOLSONTASULA PETRAKISROSEMARY VOLKMARGARET MULLIGANHOBART GUNNINGBETTY HANSENROBERT HERZOGDAVID LEVINEEUGENE PATRICKWILLIAM WAKEFIELDJANE WEBERNight Editor: Warren E. ThompsonAssistants: Goldman, Herzog.pie; it is only necessary for the members of theCommission, instead of being appointed withouttheir knowledge, to volunteer their services to the^ body. Perhaps, if enough student interest couldbe engendered in the affairs of the Men s Com¬mission, an annual competition to determine themembership of the next year’s Commission couldbe conducted by the members of the retiringgroup. Almost without exception, the practice ofappointing to the Commission men who hold im¬portant positions in student activities should be' discarded. In i;io case should a man be appoint-j ed to the body if he had shown any lack of in¬terest whatever in the matters that it is the j'ob ofthe Commission to consider.If enough interest in affairs touching social ser¬vice and religion to insure the successful operationof the Commission cannot be found among thestudent body—if an interested and active Men’sCommission cannot be recruited from the Univer¬sity—then it is time to abandon Entirely the for¬mality of having such an organization. Too manyextracurricular organizations at the University aremerely vestigial remnants of bodies once possessedof a meaning and a purpose.—L. N. R., Jr.Friday, January 15, 1932WHERE IS THE MEN’S COMMISSION?The Daily Maroon has lamented frequently and Ipublicly the impotence and inactivity of various 'of the student organizations formed to fulfill aspecific purpose. Having refrained from suchcomment for some time, we cannot but remark on ,the present practical non-existence of the Men’sCommission on Social Service and Religion. jThis body is composed of student leaders and 'faculty members, and has for its purpose the cul- itivation and administration of affairs of social ser- >vice and religion affecting the life of the under- igraduate. Never a particularly potent force,largely because the body was rarely able to findanything for itself to do save hold interesting andenjoyable “bull ” sessions which were known asmeetings, the organization has this year lapsedinto complete oblivion. Its importance has beeneclipsed even by that of the Chapel council, abody which never in the past has occupied thepublic eye. One meeting of the Men’s Commis¬sion was held last fall; there has been none since.Various reasons have been offered for the in¬activity of the Men’s Commission, both by ex¬ternal observers and by the members of the body.The real reason, we believe, lies in the constitu¬tion of the group.Membership in the Commission is announcedannually as a sort of reward for accomplishmentin campus activities. Its members today includethe president of the dramatic association, the busi- iness manager of The Daily Maroon, a Senior man- |ager of the Intramural department, and other stu- jdents who might be expected to have their extra- 1curricular time pretty well occupied. The inten¬tion, of course, in appointing these men to theCommission has not been to make a sort of un¬dergraduate honor society out of the Commission,but to secure capable men and men who havealready displayed an interest in things outside theclassroom, with the idea that these men would domost to further the work of the group. The the¬ory has not worked out as predicted. The under¬takings of the Men’s commission—when it hasembarked on undertakings—have been unsatis¬factorily prosecuted.From a consideration of the membership of theCommission, it is easy to see whence has arisenthe present inactivity of the body. Its members,selected on a basis of extracurricular success rath-er than of genuine interest in social service andreligion, are, as a rule, only mildly interested inthe affciirs with which the Commission would nor¬mally occupy itself. Even when the present mem¬bers of the Commission become engaged in aproject that the body has undertaken, they gen¬erally find their time so occupied with their studiesand their other extracurricular activities that theyare unable to spend the necessary amount of timeon the Commission’s project. The result is obvi¬ous and is to be seen in the present state of the iMen’s Commission.The remedy for the condition is equally sim-_ii: ill .1' ..i.iiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiuiiiiiiiniiiiiuitniiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiimiiiiiuiiiii:iiiii;Hiiiii:Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiuiuiiuiiiiiniiiiiit|I The Travelling Bazaar’I BY FRANK HARDING ^Last night, at the Interfraternity council,the usual momentous questions were pro¬pounded and left in the hands of the manycommittees who will go into hiding until nextyear when the new President of the councilwill ask for the report; and then if there isone it will be too late to do anything aboutit. In some way or another the talk got *around to the freshmen th'at had broken theirpledges and to outstanding pledges in gen¬eral. Finally in the true cynical fashion someone popped the question, “Sir, what is anoutstanding pledge?’’ Richmond of T. K. E.had the correct answer, “He is one who paysup all his bills."* * ¥ ¥As usual the Colm is slightly late withnews, but we would like to mention the factthat there was a short paragraph in one ofthe recent papers that stated one young lady,Janet Johns, by name, had been married lateone night at Crown Point . . . We hate tostart a rumor.H- >{■Perhaps you haven’t beard the story aboutthe time President Hut^Kins was not presi¬dent and was only tl^e secretary to Yale. Assecretary he was not supposed to be the go-between for the press but the Press werethoroughly convinced that he was; so whenanything would happen, all the N. Y. paperswould immediately get Hutchins on thephone at New Haven and ask him to verifyit. . . all rather troublesome if you can ap¬preciate his predicament. One day, how¬ever, there was a slight earthquake in NewHaven, and as the teller of this story puts it,several old ladies were precipitated into ashcans and innumerable bridge dummies slidonto the floor. The N. Y. press heard aboutit so immediately called up Hutchins for ver¬ification. “Yes, there was a small earthquakehere, and let that be a lesson to you!” washis answer.V ¥ »Somehow or another there are always peo¬ple that are getting into something and nowwe have the story about Pepper-pot Hollo¬way and Bud Radcliffe. The two laddiebucks were wandering around one night whenthey got to a place where they wereto wait for a street car. None being in sightthey stepped into a restaurant to wait; andin there was a little eight-ball waitress. Thewaitress asked if they were going home, andwhen they answered that they were, she toldthem to wait a minute till she locked up soshe could go home with them. She did thatlittle thing and got on the street car withthem. . . . That s all. What did you expect?>(■ * *We see that the Law school is circulariz¬ing some thousand alumni and goosing allthe present law studenti| into buying ticketsfor a banquet to be held in Burton Court din¬ing hall. Burton Court will seat only 250but perhaps the Law council knows what itis all about.The28thAnnualWashingtonPromWill be Held on Friday eveningFebruary 19th.One of Chicago’s finest orchestras—One of Chicago’s most attractiveballrooms—One of Chicago’s unexcelled cuisines—Will make this winter quarter formalball the most enjoyable ever held.EVERYBODY’S GOING!!THE DAILY MAROON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1932Page ThreeTheGrandstandAthletebyHERBERT JOSEPH JR.WISCONSIN INVADESMIDWAY TOMORROW;CAPT. ASHLEY OUTAnd now comes the news thatHar’ Ashley, our Whosyur captain,ha' li peach of a sprained ankle andprobaoly won’t be able to play intonioMOw’s caffe scrap with Wiscon-<in. All of which is a biff help. Weneed a few things like that to fixup right in the conference race.* ♦ * ■•■ *It iv a sure thing that the trackinlerscholastic will be run nextspring in spite of all the agitationagainst national prep tournaments.The wrestling and tennis tourneysare almost certain to be on the.sport> card. too. Which is all verynice, but we still long for that goodold ba>ketball tournament. As in-stitutions go^ that was about thebest iT.e around.*****We happened in at the fieldhousethe other day, and were just in timeto >ee Pat Page Junyah trying to hitthe eeiling with one of those puntsot hi'. While we were talking withthe Did Man, Mr. Page booted onethat looked very impressive as to(iistaiiee. So Mr. Amos AlonzoStage in person paced it off inper.'on. and the unofficial report is'i.\ty five feet on the fly. And hewa' living for height.*****And di<l you know that Vin Sah-lin of football fame, is quite a skat¬er, and won the Silver Skate derbyin the junior division twice. He willenter thi.s year, so we understand,in the ^enioI• bracket, and will un¬doubtedly fly the Maroon colors.The e< piousness of the ice this win¬ter ha> made it necessary for himto practice at Ihe* Chicago stadium.Ve>, we know copious means a lot—and that isn’t what we mean.*****Ue -ee that George Lott, alongwith Berkley Bell, has entered thePanadian indoor tennis tournament.e undei stand that he intends todo '..nu practicing in the .56th streetbarn this winter. Maybe we can dropover and get some pointers on thegan:. But it will take more thantha' to make our game presentable.* * * * *ttiih all these big league base¬ball holdouts, maybe Pat Page couldpick up a few quite acceptable ballplay.!' for his team. As long asthey won’t get anything for playinganyhow they might be induced tofight tor the glory of the dear old•Maroon. How about giving some ofthese ba.teball mugs a college edu¬cation. Pat?*****P"' ‘•me to come and get yourache.' and pains in the fieldhousebleachers tomorrow night. We canguarantee you those at least; wedon f know about the basketball.SECOND TRY1ChicagoStephensonEvansParsonsFraiderPorterWitcontinIf Steen (c)r f Reweyc OakesIg Poserrg NelsonReferee: Kearns. Umpire: Trav-niek.Chicago’s basketball team gets asecond try to win a conference gamewhen they meet Coach Meanwell’sBadger five in the field house to¬morrow night at 8.Capt. Harry Ashley, guard, is al¬most certainly out of the game be¬cause of a sprained ankle. Ashleywas hurt in practice early in theweek and the sprain proved to bea severe one. Kenneth Fraider, i“C” man from last year will beused in his place to .start, but CoachNorgren also has been using Bern¬ard Wien and two sophomores, Har¬old Wagner and Franklin Carr, inscrimmage.While Ashley is the only one ofthe regulars not expected to start,Coach Norgren probably will relieveKeith Parsons, center, in both pe¬riods of the game. Parsons haslacked the stamina this season toplay a full game at top speed. He isvaluable to the Maroon team be¬cause of his ability to tip the ball,and also as a follow-up man underthe basket. Byron Evans, the soph¬omore forward, will be shifted tocenter when Parsons is out, andScott Rexinger will be u.sed at for¬ward.Norgren, having made appreciableimprovement in the defensive workof his team last week for Minnesota,has been concentrating on improv¬ing his offense and tightening upthe passing which was poor againstthe Gophers.Although Wisconsin has lost toNorthwestern, Michigan, and Pur¬due, the Badgers have a strongteam that will be a favorite overChicago. The Wisconsin team push¬ed Northwestern into an overtimegame and made a good fight of boththe Michigan and Purdue engage¬ments. Oakes, center, and Rewey,forward, the Badgers have two menwho are 6 feet, 3 inches tall, andtheir height can be u.sed to goodadvantage against the Maroons.Capt. Steen has been leading theteam in shooting.Bobby Poser, the sharp-shootingBadger guard, is one of the Wis¬consin athletes that caused the Ma¬roons so much difficulty in the Con¬ference baeball race last spring. Heled the ninth inning attack in thefirst game between the two teamswhen they scored four runs. TheMaroons finally squeezed out witha 5 to 4 victory. In the return gameat Madison he pitched, and histeammates capitalized on Maroonblunders to win 5 to 0.Wrestlers MeetIowa TeachersTa/morroiw NightMaroon wrestlers will participatein their first major meet of the sea¬son tomorrow when they meet IowaState Teachers college at 8 in Bart¬lett gym. Admission will be fiftycents.Coach Vorres has not yet com¬pleted the lineup that will go intothe ring. Lewis, 118 pounds; Felt-bein, 126 pounds; and Sherre, 135pounds are the probable entries inthe lowest three weights. Widte,Bargeman, or Bion Howard willwrestle at 145 pounds, while Hub¬bard or Bob Howard will see actionin 155 pound division.Heide or Shapiro will wrestle at165 pounds and Captain Gabel willfill the 175 pound berth. Barnett orShapiro will compete as heavy¬weights.The Iowa State Teachers’ lineupincludes: 118, Brownlie or Black;I 126, Shearman or Stoddard; 135,I Brindley or Harris; 145, Duea orj Harmon; 155, Sheffield or Andrews;j 165, Berryhill or Schuman; 175.I Luker; heavyweight, Westwick ori Gerber.I Brindley Harmon, and Lukerj wrestled agains the Maroons lastyear at Cedar Falls, Iowa. The restj of the squad will be new men tothe University wrestlers. The Iowateam meets Northwestern at 4 thisI afternoon in Patten gym.Activity Heads Find’35 More Ambitious(Continued from page 1)increase in the number of fresh¬men enrolled in the journalismclass. Sixty regi.stered for thecourse this year, against forty lastyear.Members of the athletic depart¬ment found a decrease in the sizeof basketball and football squads,but had not detected any differ¬ence in the calibre of the material.FAST GAMES YIEWEDIN SECOND ROUND OFl-MUGER’S TOURNEY^The second round of intramuralbasketball in the “A” divisionswung into play last night when thePonies’ second team doubled Mead-ville’s scanty four points, and theScramblers let the Bai-barLans’ sec¬ond team off with 10 points to theirown 19.Psi Upsilon easily w’on its firstgame of the season and in the fast¬est and most thrilling game of thenight. Sigma Chi lost to the KappaNu second team, 12 to 14.Ponies II, 8 Meadville, 4The Ponies’ second team showednone of the championship form oftheir first string in a slow gamemarked by ragged playing and manypersonal fouls. Wolfberg of the lit¬tle Horses showed up rather wellwith five points to his credit.Scramblers, 19; Barbarians II, 10Nothing outstanding was shownwhen the dormitory boys took thegame away from the junior Barba¬rians by a healthy margin. Kaufmanscored most of the Scramblers’ 19points.THEATREhJane KesnerPsi Upsilon, 15; Tau Delta Phi, 7The Psi U’s had no trouble intaking their first game away fromthe Tau Delts by a good margin ofeight points. Seven fouls were call¬ed on Psi U, and Tau Delt did theunusual thing of scoring all the free-throws given to them.Phi Beta Delt, 25; Phi Gam Delt, 15Ten perSb’nal fouls were called onthe Phi Gams last night as they lostto the PhitDeta Deltas by the widemargin often points, wherein fig¬ures speak for themselves. J. Weisswas high-i^olpt man for the winners.CORRECTIONGRANADA CAFE6800 COTTAGE GROVENO COVERMINIMUM CHARGESpend What You WantStay As Long As You L\[^e“HARLEM KNIGHTS”GREATEST OF ALL BANDSDORCHESTER 0074 - PHONES - HYDE PARK 0646mmIn reference to a recent articleappearing in the Daily Maroonwhich reported the work of Mr. M.C. Guha, who was described as acandidate for a higher degree, thePhysiology Department wishes tostate that Mr. GuKa is not a candi¬date for any degree in that depart¬ment. His supposed discovery hadto do with a snakebite antitoxin.However, no responsibility for hisclaims has been assumed by thePhysiology department.Phi Sif Delt* 25; Alpha Delt Phi, 13Sam Herwitz showed that hecould do ' something besides playfootball last night by scoring mo.stof the Phi Sigs’ points as they beatthe AlphaUelts 23 to 13. Eightfouls were called on the winners.Kappa Nu 11, 14; Sigma Chi, 12An overtime period was necessaryto decide the Sig Chi-KN contestwhen the two teams were tied at12 all at the end of the second half.“RHAPSODY IN BLACK”Garrick >CASTEthel WatersValaidaBerry BrothersCecil Mack’s ChoirDusty FletcherFlorence HillBlue McAllisterAvis AndrewsGeneva WashingtonEloise UggamsPike Davis’ Continental Orchestra* * *These blue, blue blacks from Har¬lemHave a deity.Which they worship with contagiousSpontaneity.Syncopation is their shrineAnd with rhythmic anodyneThey proclaim aloft their swankHomogeneity.Down in Africa where savageryHolds sway.“It’s quite shocking”.The missionaries say—To behold the sensualityAs the timekeeper wkis about toblow his whistle. Miller of KappaNu arched the winning shot into thehoop.Deke, 20; Alpha Sig, 9The Dekes easily took the rough¬est game of the night away fromthe Alpha Sigs by the onesidedscore of 20 to 9. Balsley and Hea¬ton shared honors for outstandingwork of the Dekes. Ulcek and Crom¬er showed up well for Alpha Sig.Phi Delta Theta, 16; PhiKappa Sig, 9Recovering from a one-point lead |by their opponents at the half, thePhi Delts came from behind anddefeated Phi Kappa Sigma in roughplay by the wide margin of sevenpoints.TRY OUR SPECIALSUNDAY DINNERSpecial Middle-nite LuncheonsSelected Quality FoodJ. & C. Restaurant1527 E. 55th St. Dor. 10361FOR COLLEGE GIRLSAniw--- Graduates or Undergraduates. Six, ••^months of thorough training — putinto a three nMHiths' intensive course for girls whoknow how to Btudy. Send today for Bulletin.Courses sUirl October 1» January 1«(April l.Jnly 1MOSBR PVSIIVESiii COLLEGE‘*7%4 tfuetiMM trith a Univeritity Atmogph^re'"116 8ou^ Michigan Avenue* Chicagojlypne Handolph 4347WRIGHT HAND LAUNDRYREDUCED PRICES1315 East Fifty Seventh StreetPhone Midway 2073Which quite destroys moralityWhen the tom-toms beat the minutesOf the day.And in our clime, when they haveHalf a chance—They seize it, withoutA second glance.For it is the negro natureTo be free from formal hateurAnd to give their souls unfetteredTo the dance.To their ears, the show’sA euphonyOf ecstaticCacophony—Where, with deep emotion.They perform their svelte devotionIn an orgy of the bluestHarmony.Ethel Waters is the salientQueen of Spades.Beside whom, the lesser torchUpholding maids—Are depressed past all resiliency.While her harmonic brilliancyIs of the deep blue dye, thatNever fades.“Black Rhapsody” is not justEthnology.Nor appealed just to our queerbrand ofPsychology.But the blackened rhythm and blu¬ish notes,Spangled skirts and purple coats.Reveal what can be done withPhysiology.ExecutiveBusinessTRAININGfor College MenPrepare yourself for a successful careerin business. Avoid the wasted years oftraining in the “school of hard knocks”.Babson Institute offers a nine months’residential course in executive trainingthat gives you the fundamentals ofbusiness and actual experience in theirpractical application.Students are in a commercial environment andunder the direction of business men. They keepregular office hours and have frequent contactwith actual business organizations. You will ap¬proach “your first job” with the confidence bomof experience, ready for rapid progress.Next Term Begins March 26thMail Coupon for BookletOur booklet, “Training for Business Leadership”,gives full information about this unique courseof business training. Sent without obligation.Simply mail the coupon below.BABSON"■ INSTITUTE ■■■■■Div. L380 Babson Park, Mass.Send me, without obligation, “Trainingfor Business Leadership” and completeparticulars about Babson Institute.NameCollegeAddressHomeAddressCityStatetmmmmmmi®DTHE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCHWoodlawn Avenue at 57th StreetVON OGDEN VOGT, MinisterSUNDAY, JANUARY ff^’1932I 1:00 A. M.—“Yokes of Wood and •!'Iton", by Dr. Vogt.4:00 P. M.—Channing Club Tea.^'A ^febate on “Commun¬ism and Capitalism*’ by Donald Becker andByron Dunham.Visitors Welcomed!OPEN HOUSE EVERY FRlDAViEVENINGorsiftpCHRIST CHURCH (Episcopal)65th and Woodlawn Ave.The Rev. Walter C. Bihler, M. A., Rector.SUNDAY SERVICES, JANUARY 1 77:30 A. M.—Holy Communion.10:00 A. M.—Church School.1 I :00 A. M.—Holy Communion,5:00 P. M.—Young People’s Fellowship.8:00 P. M.—Evensong.St. Paul’s Church .50th and Dorchester • \ \ \Parish Office: 4945 DorchesterAvenueTel. Oakland 3185REV. GEORGE H. THOMASSunday Services:Holy Communion, 8:00 A. M.Church School Service, 9:30 A.M.Morning Service, 11:00 A. M.Evening Service, 5:00 P. M.Young People’s Society6:00 P. M.The Church ofThe Redeemer(EPISCOPAL)56th and BlackstoneRev. E. S. WhiteEpiscopal Student PastorSUNDAY SERVICESHoly Communion, 8.00 A. M.Short Sung Eucharist, 9:30 A. M.Choral Eucharist and Sermon,11:00 A. M.Choral Evensong and Sermon,7:30 P. M.Three services every week-day.Church open daily for prayer and.meditation.Hyde Park BaptistChurch5600 Woodlawn Ave.Norris L. TibbettsRolland W. SchloerbMinistersSunday, January 1711:00 A. M.—“Children, Par¬ents and the Church”. R. W.Schloerb.8:00 P. M.—“A Step TowardPeace”. N. L. Tibbetts.Page FourTHE DAILY MAROON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1932LIND’S TEA ROOM6252 University Ave.Special Luncheon 40cDinners 50c and 60cBargeuns inBooks!New books on ourtables every day.New Books and UsedBooks at BargainPrices.Woodwwth’sBook Store1311 E. 57th St.near Kimbark Ave.GYMNASIUMSUPPLIESTypewriters andTypewritingSuppliesEVERYTHING THESTUDENT NEEDSTODAYon theQUADRANGLESThe Daily MaroonNight editor for the next issue:James F. Simon. Assistants: Wil¬liam Wakefield and David Levine.The editorial staff will meet inthe Maroon office at 12 bells.Undergraduate OrganisationsGerman Club meets in Ida Noyesat 4.Hockey Club Tea, Ida Noyes, 4.W. A. A. Cozy, Ida Noyes Hall,3-5.Renaissance Society sponsors Ar¬thur Upham Pope, director of Amer¬ican Institute for Persian Art andArchaeology, who will speak on“General Principles of PersianArt”. Oriental Institute LectureHall, 8:30.All University Mixer, Ida NoyesHall, 3:30.Debating Union meets in Room AReynolds Club, 1:15.Dramatic Association Initiation,Cliff Dwellers, 220 S. MichiganBlvd., 9:00 P. M.Music and Religious ServicesDivinity Chapel: “What Is Hap¬pening to the Social Gospel. IV”,Professor Arthur E. Holt, of the Di¬vinity School.Organ Music, the University Cha¬pel, 5, Porter Heaps will play Gale’s“Sunshine and Shadow”; Franck’s“Cantabile”; Gaul’s “Daguereotypeof an old mother”; and Cole’s-‘Rhapsody”.Victrola Concert, Reynolds Club,12:30. Beethoven’s “Great Fugue,Opus 133” and “Quartet in F, Opus135” will be played.Cap and Gown PicturesSophomore members of the Capand Gown staff, 12:45.W. A. A, Advisory Board, 12:10.Discipies Club,l2:30. |Upper Class Councilors, 1:00. !Miscellaneous |Radio Lecture, Station WMAQ.Professor Percy Boynton speaks at8 on “Colonial Literature”.Public Lecture: “The EconomicsDepartment”, Associate ProfessorHarry Gideonse, of the EconomicsDepartment, at the Art Institute,6:45.Debate: University of Chicago, af¬firmative, University of Pittsburg,negative on “Resolved that Con¬gress should enact legislation forcentrajlized corttrol of industries’,Harper M 11, 8:30.Graduate Club Council party.Graduate Clubhouse, 8:00 P. M.SATURDAY, JANUARY 16Radio Lectures over StationWMAQ: at 8:30 A. M. “News fromthe Quadrangles”, Mr. John Howe;at 9:00 A. M. “The Professor at theBreakfast Table”.Meetings of the University RulingBodies: Faculty of the Division ofthe Humanities, Cobb 110, 10; Ex¬ecutive Board of the Graduate Fac¬ulty, Cobb 115, 11.Wrestling Meet: Chicago vs. IowaState Teachers, Bartlett Gymnas¬ium, 8:00 P. M.Varsity Basketball Game, Chi¬cago vs. Wisconsin, Field House,8:00 P. M.Social ActivitiesTau Kappa Epsilon, Mother's Clubbridge and dance, 9:15.SUNDAY, JANUARY 17University Religious Service, Uni¬versity Chapel, 11. The Rev. HaroldL. Bowman, D. D. The ^'irst Presby¬terian Church, Portland, Oregon,will conduct the service.Channing Club Tea, UnitarianParish House, 4. Debate: “Capital¬ism and Socialism”, Donald Beckervs. Byron Dunham.1 Shop TalkAdv.When moneyackes attack youSelect a cozy nook—Then hurry to the Bookstoreand rent a rousing book.There’s nothing like a good, live¬ly story—full of heroes who takebeing heroes Very Seriously, andheroines w’ho like being taken VeiySeriously by heroes — anyway,there’s nothing like a good, livelystory to dispel gloom and depres¬sion. And non-fiction is perhapseven more rousing and soul-stirringthan Fiction these days; there’s somuch to be said about Everything,and such a multitude of stimulatingviewpoints to study. You’ll find avery extensive collection of the new¬est Fiction and Non-fiction at theRental Library at the University ofChicago Bookstore, and the rentalfee is only 3 cents a day. New bookscan be ordered and received in aslittle as a week’s time—a real ad¬vantage over most library systems,where it takes weeks,—sometimesninths—to get the latest books.There’s a branch Rental Library atthe University College downtown,and at the Education Bookstore inBlaine "Hall. Take advantage of theRental Library for supplementaryreading in all your courses. You see.it’s all planned for your convenience.Speedy service and care and neat¬ness in handling are undoubtedly theprerequisites for GOOD CLEAN¬ING. The Cleaners Service, 1416E. 55th St., phone Midway 2800 areas fussy about your things as youwould be yourself. Everything—in¬cluding the shop—is the es.sence ofneatness and cleanliness?. Dig outthe dresses and suits you’ve had putaway in the back of your closet,and take them to the Cleaners Serv¬ice TODAY! Perfect 6 hour serviceinsures their prompt return.HILL’S CAFETERIA63rd and Woodlawn Ave.Always Reliable for your Breakfast.Lunch or Dinner.General Price Reduction inkeeping with the timet.DUKE UNIVERSITYSchool of MedicineDurham, N. C.Applications for admission to the firstand third year medical classes enteringOctober 1, 1932 should be sent as * ion aspossible, and will be considered in theorder of receipt. The entrance qaalifica-tions are IntelliRence, character, twoyears of colleare work and the require-menta for erade A medical achooN. Cata-loRucs and application forms may he ob¬tained from the Dean.MStT. P.says:DON’T BE LIKE KING TUT!There’s no need to keep things for3000 years just because you don’t knowwhat to do with them. Text books thatyou’re no longer using, or an old bask¬etball or football that’s still in goodconditions wil hnd a quick marketamong the students. Tell them aboutit in The Trading Post. Phone HydePark 9221.WANTF.'D T'vo students t«> sell,lictl<innrie.< of IJ. S- history. Justpubli.died. Everyone s proeiwt.Real «i»port unity for aitifresfcivenuin or woman to earn steady in¬come. For i>artirular« address Wil-liam Mead. 53H 8. Clark St.. Chi-eairo.WANTF’.I) Hniversity graduatewith secretarial experience in leyralwork and knowledtre of presentiH>litii-nl situation in Chicago.I’ermaiumt iHwition. Mi-<s Rohin-s.tn.TOR RENT Rale. rm. l»t .ftOutside. I’riv. bath. $20 i»er nv5630 Kimliark Ave. Dorch. 29-WANTED -Cirl to teach fodancinir on Wednesdays from 11:to 12:16 in South Side airls schi.Miss Robinson.WANTED Girl to stay even in.’with children in cxchanae for ri-and tviard. Miss Robinson.W'ANTED Exiierlenced cashierto work for meals in South SiJ-cafeteria. Home eeonomict studeipreferred. Misa Robinson.Enriching the LanguageyiTAMlNE, Dermutation. Halitosis.Jimmp-pipe. Neutrodyne, Ortho-phonic . . These and hundreds ofothers . . . words that have won a placein contemporary language throughthe medium of the advertising col¬umns.How can anyone keep up withthe times if he doesn’t read the adver¬tisements ?It is often said that the advertise¬ments offer a liberal education. Thenew electrical appliances that take thedrudgery out of housework first sawthe light of day in the advertising col¬umns. A vegetable substitute fbr silkis discovered, and you hear about itfirst through an advertisement.What are the new models in mo¬tor cars? The advertisements tell you,before you go to the auto show.What’s the best show in town? What’sthe newest in hats and shoes and golf-togs? Consult the advertisements.That’s the w§iy to keep up with thetimes. Tliat’s the way to make thefamily budget go farther.Read the advertisements in thispaper regularly. The big ones and thelittle ones. Search them through forvalues you might otherwise neverknow about.By Becoming a regular reader of theadvertising columns, you becomea well informed person.yjMp illanionVol. 32. No. 55.UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, TUESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1932Price Five CenUTWENTY-TWO TAKEiLouis UntermeyerBIDS FROM SEYEN^ Fourth LecturerCLUBS FOLLOWING^ On Mo^y SeriesQUARTER’S RUSHINGNAME WILSON HEAD JAMES 0. MC KINSEYOF UBRARY SCHOOL SPEAKS TOMORROWMortar Board and ChiRho Sigma LeadWith Fivetransfer studentsTwenty-two transfer studentswere pledjfed by seven clubs Sundayat the official bidding, following aquarter’s period of rushing.^ Onlytransfer women were eligible* fordill) pledging at this time.('hi Rho Sigma and Mortar Boardhead the list with a total of fivepledges each. Quadrangler, Wyvernand Ksoteric pledged three each,.Sigma two, and Pi Delta Phi pledgedone. The official lists of pledgesfor Phi Beta Delta and Delta Sigma■Rave not yet been obtained.Chi Rho Sigma('hi Rho Sigma has pledged SallyFisher, fTiarlotte Foster, ElizabethFreeman, Josephine Holmes andMary Solenberger..Mortar Board’s pledges are Fran¬ces Dexter, Phyllis Ferry, Hester.4nn Thomas, Eleanor Welch, andKllen Westphal.Ksoteric announces the pledgingof Dora Dixon, Molly Mason, andMel Russell.Wyvern pledged Katherine Hunt¬er. F'aith Fitzgerald, and MaurineF.nihenburg.QuadranglerQuadrangler pledged VirginiaBoone, Jean Price and FrancesLinden.Those who pledged Sigma are.Mary .Ann Page and Marjorie Baed-er.Pi Delta Phi pledged Harriet E.Child.These students entered the Uni¬versity from other colleges last falland .w'ere therefore eligible alterone quarter’s residence. Pledgingtook place as soon as the eligibilitylists were sent out from the record¬er’s office after a check on gradeshad been made.The procedure was the same asthat which has been effect Inprevious years for the pledging oftreshmen. Sealed bids were takento Mi.ss F'rances Lauren in IdaNoyes hall. She sent out special de¬livery letters to prospective pledges,who came to Ida Noyes hall Sunday(Continued on page 3)Louis Untermeyer, styled by AmyLowell as the “most versatile ‘geniusin America”, is coming to campusTuesday at 8:15 to speak on “TheCritics Half Holiday” in the fo irthof a series of lectures sponsored bythe William Vaughn Moody founda¬tion.Mr. Untermeyer is known chieflyfor his poetry and criticism. Hisbest known works in verse include“Challenge”, “Roast T^eviathan”,“The.se Times” a series written in1917 and containing reflections onthe world war, “The New Adam”.“Parodies”, “Ye.sterday and Today”,and the recently published “BurningBush.”“Moses” publi.shed in 1929 wasfollowed in March, 1930, by “BlueRhine and Black F’orest”, a travelbook with an anthology of Senwartz-wald verse based on Mr. Untermey-er’s travels in Germany. This an¬thology is now being used as a col¬lege lextbook.Mr. Untermeyer is also a wellknown designer and manufacturingjeweler. He started in the jewelrybusiness at 17 as one of the em¬ployees in his father’s and uncle’sfirm, Untermeyer, Robbins andCharles Keller Company. Later hebecame vice-president of the com¬pany and then manager of the chieffactory at New’ark, New Jersey. Heresigned from this capacity in 1923in order to devote his entire time tostudy and writing.His first contributions to publica¬tions were to the Liberator and TheSeven Arts. He has recently con¬tributed criticism and reviews toThe New Republic, the New YorkF2vening Post, the Yale Review andthe Saturday Review of Literature.He is the translator and compiler(Continued on page 4)New Dean Leaves Post at Leatiing Accountant LecturesNorth Carolina School In Vocational SeriesLouis Round Wilson, librarian atthe University of North Carolina,Chapel Hill, North Carolina, willleave his post to become the Deanof the Graduate Library School atthe University next September, theBoard of Trustees announced yester¬day. The position has been temporar- \ily filled since 1929, when George A. IWorks, present Dean of Students,resigned his position as head of theschool to accept the presidency ofConnecticut Agricultural College.Mr. Wilson was graduated fromHaverford College, and receivedhis advanced degrees from NorthCarolina. He became librarian at \North Carolina in 1901, and has jretained the post ever since. In ;1922 he assumed the directorship of ithe University of North CarolinaPi •ess. He is known for his work inthe library field, Tn addition to vari¬ous works of philological subjects.He is a contributor to numerouslibrary magazines.The Graduate Library School atthe University was founded in theautumn of 1928 and Mr. Works wasnamed Dean. Under Dean Worksand his successors the school gainedapid prominence among library(Continued on page 3)Professor James 0. McKinsey,head of the firm of James 0. Mc¬Kinsey and company, certified pub¬lic accountants, will deliver thethird lecture in the vocationalseries, “Opportunities in Business”,tomorrow at 3:30 in room 108, Has¬kell hall.Mr. McKinsey is professor of busi¬ness and administration in theSchool of Commerce and Adminis¬tration. He graduated from the Uni¬versity in 1916, received his A. M.degree in 1919, and since that timeTias graduated from The law schoolof the University of Arkansas, andthe commerce school of St. Louisuniversity. He has also lectured onaccounting at Columbia university.The.se lectures, “Opportunities inBusiness”, have been arranged by jthe Alumni Committee on Vocations !in cooperation with the Board ofVocational Guidance and Placementand the School of Commerce andAdministration. A second series oflectures, “Opportunities in the Pro¬fessions”, which will start Februaryi and which will continue every suc¬ceeding Thursday for five weeks, hasbeen arranged by the Board of \’o-cational Guidance and Placement in(Continued on page 3)Gideonse Advocates GovernmentalOwnership of Armament IndustriesPHOENIX STRIKESAT DAILY MAROONJESTS TOMORROWSample Questions forCurrent Events ExamSubmitted by Gosnell•^Ir. Harold Gosnell, assistant pro¬fessor of political science has sub¬mitted the third and last of a seriesot sugjfostive questions for the‘ urrent Events examination to begiven by the New York Times some¬time in March.rife questionnaire is divided intothree parts, political, economic, andgeneral interest. Some of the<!ueries for the political section are:bom did the Emperor of Japanask to form a new cabinet? In theTnited States who was chosen asSpeaker of the House and to whatI'arty did he belong? In what coun-•'.V did the President pi'oclaim at hiistmas poliTical truce? Who re¬signed as President of China, andwhat family thereby lost its po¬litical power?A tew of the questions in the eco¬nomics query are: What emergency*01 lee was issued by the PresidentGermany? What large American‘ity became financially insolvent in'Hcember? What three-fold aid did^ I'A'sident Hoover in his annualmessage to Congress recommend for^•A'dit relief? What economy movesthe Major Baseball Leaguesmade?the la.st group were the follow-(Contiauud oa page 4)Gently admonishing The DailyMaroon for what the Phoenix ed¬itors helieve to be misplaced at¬tempts at humor, the January edi¬tion of the monthly - campus comicmagazine will make its appearancetomorrow, sold by a motley array ofsalespersons drafted from the ranksof unemployed stufferits.Editor Orin E. Tovrov last night! explained that the Phoenix wishesj to maintain its balance in comment-j ing on any phase of campus life that1 appeis to its sense of humor. Hedenied any intention to “pick afight” with The Daily .Maroon.Among the co'ntributor to the is¬sue are John Mills, whose full-pagephotograph, “Geology and God”,reveals the harsh Gothic in one ofits .softer moods; Allen C. East,whose short-story, “Alice in Blund-erland”, satirizes life on the quad¬rangles: and Drs. Peterson and Al¬len, whose article on clubs givesthem their first opportunity to writeat length.(Continued on page 4)Government ownership of the en¬tire armament industry was suggest-l ed as the first step toward an ef¬fective world disarmament programby Harry D. Gideonse, professor ofEconomics, in an address at the ArtInstitute Friday evening. No privateconcerns should be allowed to profitfrom the exploitation of interna¬tional distrust. Dr. Gideonse said.In discussing the economic as¬pects of disarmament Dr. Gideonserevealed official figures recentlymade available and pointed out thatAmerica cannot neglect the disarma¬ment problem on the ground that itis largely a European affair. Amer¬ica spent more money for nationaldefense in 1930 than any other pow¬er, and its increase in such expendi¬tures, over a period of fifteen years,has been far greater proportionatelythan that of any other power. Conse¬quently, America must be verymuch a party in any equitable solu- ,tion of the aisarmament problem. i“We often hear,” Dr. Gideonse jsaid, “that the United States is not |a large factor in the race for com- jpetitive armaments. This assump- ■tion is false.”“No one who has witnessed theeconomic distress caused by theWorld War will ever maintain thatwar pays. That period in the historyof mankind is over. But if we areto be realistic m studying the eco¬nomics of war and of armamentswe must recognize that while war.does not pay as an undertaking forsociety as a whole, it holds verydefinite advantages for limitedgroups. In the armament manufac¬turers we have a group maintainedby public expenditure that has adecided financial interest in foster¬ing the sort of international sus¬picion and distrust that lead to high¬er armament expenditures.”Dr. GTdeonse believes that thefirst step toward correction of suchconditions is the public ownership ofthe entire armament industry. Wealready do some of our own navalbuilding and we should extend theapplication of that principle.In discussing the “budgetary”method of cutting armaments, underwhich each nation would agree tocut its expenditures by a definitepercentage. Dr. Gideonse said thatany cut short of forty percentwould be meaningless. “One reason(Continued on page 3)IDA NOYES DIRECTORFETED BY AUXILIARYMembers of the Ida Noyes Auxi¬liary will be intixiduced to ‘ijMrs.Alma P. Brook, new director of thewomen’s recreation hall, at an in¬formal dinner January 25 in theIda Noyes sunparlor. This is thefirst official funefion to be givenby the auxiliary in honor of Mrs.Brook. Miss Damaris Ames, assist¬ant to Dean Works and secretaryto Mrs. Brook, will also be a guest.Approximately forty women, includ¬ing members of both this year’s andlast year’s auxiliaries, are expectedto attend.The program of the Auxiliary forthe Winter quarter includes a seriesof teas that are held every weekdayafternoon exceot FViday.‘Who Did It?’ Campus Query as Lights ofBeecher and Foster Halls Glow LuridlyBY DAVID C. LEVINEWho turned University avenueinto a red-light district by paintingthe street lamps in front of Beech¬er and Foster halls a lurid crimson?This question was asked of sixteenbig men and women on campus, andfor the first time in history six¬teen big men anff women on campusreturned exactly the same answer:“I didn’t do it.”In itself, this would seem to casta peculiar light on the matter, al¬most as peculiar, tn fact, as the redlights themselves. But at least someof the peculiarTly was dispelledwhen, the quest being extended toother parts of the campus, it was dis¬covered that everybody, with a glib¬ness that seemed rehearsed, answer¬ed, “I didn't do it.”A typical example of this pass-the-buck, tell-nothing attitude whichis effectually cloaking this nefariousact in mystery was encountered inthe (usually) infallible Informationoffice. There the question wasasked of the young lady at the desk,later identified as Miss MarjorieCahill. “I didn’t do—I mean, wehave no information on the matter.But there’s a fellow named Petersonin the F''aculty Ex^Tarige that mightknow about it. I’ll askj him.” Shedid. “It’s a lie,” Peterson said. “Ididn’t do it. Why don’t you ask theBuildings and Grounds depart¬ment?”But the call at the Buildings andGrounds office was, if possible, lesssatisfactory. There the^ answer tothe question was an emphatic “No!”It might have been much more em¬phatic had not the reporter, withgreat presence of mind,^ l^ept threedesks, one clerk, and a stout wood¬en railing between himself‘and thegentleman to whom his query wasaddressed., I t '♦ <There the matter stands. Al¬though it is fairly certain that thelamps did not burst intd llaJoom oftheir own accord, either n«, one j willtell, or else no one knows how theygot that way. Or perhapif we shouldsay that no infoi'mation is forthcom¬ing because everybody no’s thequestion.Professor SquiresBreaks up RacketsIn His Spare Time“Cleaning up the Augean stables”in the Cleaning and Dying Industryhas been only a sideline for Ben¬jamin M. Squires, parMime pro¬fessorial lecturer on economics atthe University, Harry A. Millis, pro¬fessor and chairnian of the eco¬nomics department revealed yester¬day.The name of Professor-Lecturer-Arbitrator Squires came into thelimelight of public attention Sundayin connection with the death ofBen Rosenberg, independent-mindedcleaner, at the hands of racketeers.The Chicago Tribune published astory disclosing Squires’ position aspresident of the Cleaners and DyersInstitute at a reputed salary of$25,000 a year.Professor Millis said yesterdaythat the story was almost entirelyinaccurate. “A good part of whathas appeared in city papers is er¬roneous. For example. Squires’salary is the merest fraction of the$25,000 he is said by the Tribuneto receive.“In fact,” he continued, “Squii-es’original thought was to serve as ar¬bitrator for the short time regardedas necessary to clean up and stab¬ilize the situation. The salary wasconsidered as a purely incidentalmatter.”Among the other interests withwhich Mr. Squires, who is at pres¬ent taking a short rest in Florida,is associated is the advisory boardof the labor department of the Stateof Illinois, of which he has beenchairman for the past four years.His particular province has been thepublic employment offices in thestate. Last year, he served as sec¬retary of Governor Emmerson’scommission on unemployment re¬lie.(Continued on pnge 4)SOPHOMORES SIGNUP FOR SIXTEENFRIAR POSITIONSSophomore candidates for posi¬tions of sophomore managers inBlackfriars will sign up today andtomorrow from 12 to 1:15 in theBlackfriar office on the third floorof Mitchell tower. All sophomoresare eligible for these positions.Sixteen positions will be filled.Each of the newly appointed juniormanagers has under him four sopho¬mores to carry on the detailed workof the department. The positionsare: under the business department—box office, advertising, ticketsales, and program; under the com¬pany department; cast chorus,music, and ushers; under the public¬ity department—newspapers, pos¬ters, radio, and high schools; andunder the technical department—scenery, lights, costumes, and prop¬erties.The junior managers for the com¬ing yeat are: Louis Galbraith, pub¬licity; Alfred Jacobsen, business;Henry Sulcer, technuial; and RalphWebster, company. These men were(Continued on page 4)MIRROR ANNOUNCESSEVEN WRITERS OFMUSIC, LYRICS, FORREVUE ‘ALL’S FAIR’Alumni and UndergradsContributors toI 932 ShowVOICE TRYOUTS TODAYQUAUTIES OF PERSIANART CITED BY POPEVoice try-outs for singing partsin the 1932 Mirror production willbe held this afternoon from 2:30to 3:30 under Mack Evans, directorof the University choir, in his studioon the second floor of MitchellTower.Seven composers of lyrics andmusic for “All’s Fair,” the currentannual Mirror revue, were announc¬ed yesterday by members of theboard, and include alumni, under¬graduates, and former members ofthe University. Those whose musicwas selected are: Betty Bateson,William Carroll, Dorothy Dunaway,Norman Eaton, Leona Bachrach Gra¬ham, Orvis Henkle, and Ray Vane.Betty Bateson is not at the pres¬ent time in residence at the Univer¬sity, but attended courses last year.This is the first year that she haswritten music for a Mirror show.William Carroll, best known forhis composition of “Raft to Love,”one of several lyrics which hewrote for “Captain Kidd, Jr.”, lastyear’s Blackfriars show, has contrib¬uted to the Mirror production. Hehas also been selected to make or¬chestrations of the musical numbersfor the entire “All’s Fair” revue.Dorothy Dunaway, Music chair¬man of the 1932 Mirror, w'as affi¬liated with “What Ho!” the 1931presentation, and assisted at thattime with musical accompanimentjiduring rehearsal.An alumnus and past president ofthe Dramatic ^association, NormanEaton, returns to the limelight withhis contributions to this year’sshow. While an undergraduate hewas a college marshal and memberof Alpha Delta Phi; as a graduate,he directs one of three plays whichwere announced for Playfest in anissue of The Daily Maroon lastweek.Leona Bachrach Graham is notregistered in the University thisyear.Orvis Henkle’s compositions comeas a result of familiarity with the(Continued on page 4)Men Gain at DormsDespite All RumorsThat Food Is BadPersian art, its characteristics,and its effect on the art of othercountries and other civilizations wasthe topic of an illustrated lecture byArthur Upham Pope, director of theAmerican Institute of Persian Artand Archaeology, given last Fridaynight at the Oriental Institute un¬der the auspices of the RenaissanceSociety.Mr. Pope cited as the outstandingqualities of Persian Art a love andcommand of pure forms and fidelityto nature: a mastery of color, re¬markable in intensity and variety;and a magnificent control of scaleand value. It is a communal art,fusing its materials into a unifiedwhole dominated by a single idea.BY WILLIAl? WAKEFIELDAs the rumors about bad food inthe dorms are beginning to die, dueeither to the lack of promulgators'or to the improvement of the food^there comes a defense from the memin charge of the Burton Court office*that several had moved away lasttquarter because they had eaten toomuch.This is almost too much to believein view of the fact that so many^ of the “across the midway” boys hadprotested vigorously about the qual¬ity of the food. The exlanationwas immediately forthcoming.A certain Mr. Willoughby whohails from England was so smittenwith the dormitory menu that hegained exactly forty pounds fromOctober l till Christmas. The per¬son in point, because of his eatingpropensities was forced to move toHitchcock Hall, where it is reportedthat he is not gaining at such arapid rate. A ‘further example wasgiven of a boy named Crane who-ran a close second to Willoughby bygaining twenty-five pounds and who-remained in the same dorms this;quarter (no doubt to try and rivalthe Englishman’s record.) Even thefaculty figured in this marvelous(Continued on page 4)Page FourTHE DAILY MAROON, FRIDAY. JANUARY 15. 19321LIND’S TEA ROOM6252 University Ave.Special Luncheon 40cDinners 50c and 60cBargains inBooks!New books on ourtables every day.New Books and UsedBooks at BargainPrices.Woodw<Hth’sBook Store1311 ELSTthSt.near Kimbark Ave.GYMNASIUMSUPPLIESTypewriters andTypewritingSuppliesEVERYTHING THESTUDENT NEEDSTODAYon theQUADRANGLESThe Daily MaroonNight editor for the next issue:James F. Simon. Assistants: Wil¬liam Wakefield and David Levine.The editorial staff will meet inthe Maroon office at 12 bells.Undergraduate OrganisationsGerman Club meets in Ida Noyesat 4.Hockey Club Tea, Ida Noyes, 4.W’. A. A. Cozy, Ida Noyes Hall,3-5.Renaissance Society sponsors Ar¬thur Upham Pope, director of Amer¬ican Institute for Persian Art andArchaeology, who will speak on“General Principles of PersianArt”. Oriental Institute LectureHall, 8:30.All University Mixer, Ida NoyesHall, 3:30.Debating Union meets in Room AReynolds Club, 1:15.Dramatic Association Initiation,Cliff Dwellers, 220 S. MichiganBlvd., 9:00 P. M.Music and Religious ServicesDivinity Chapel: “What Is Hap¬pening to the Social Gospel. IV”,Professor Arthur E. Holt, of the Di¬vinity School.Organ Music, the University Cha¬pel, 5, Porter Heaps will play Gale’s“Sunshine and Shadow”; Franck’s“Cantabile”; Gaul’s “Daguereotypeof an old mother”; and Cole’s-‘Rhapsody”.Victrola Concert, Reynolds Club,12:30. Beethoven’s “Great Fugue,Opus 133” and “Quartet in F, Opus135” will be played.Cap and Gown PicturesSophomore members of the Capand Gown staff, 12:45.W. A. A, Advisory Boards 12:10.Discipies Clab,l2:30.Upper Class Councilors, 1:00.MiscellaneousRadio Lecture, Station WMAQ.Professor Percy Boynton speaks at8 on “Colonial Literature”.Public Lecture: “The EconomicsDepartment”, Associate ProfessorHarry Gideonse, of the EconomicsDepartment, at the Art Institute,6:45.Debate: University of Chicago, af¬firmative, University of Pittsburg,negative on “Resolved that Con¬gress should enact legislation forcentrailized corttrol of industries’,Harper M 11, 8:30.Graduate Club Council party.Graduate ClubfTouse, 8:00 P. M.SATURDAY, JANUARY 16Radio Lectures over StationWMAQ: at 8:30 A. M. “News fromthe Quadrangles”, Mr. John Howe;at 9:00 A. M. “The Professor at theBteakfast Table”.Meetings of the University RulingBodies: Faculty of the Division ofthe Humanities, Cobb 110, 10; Ex¬ecutive Board of the Graduate Fac¬ulty, Cobb 115, 11.Wrestling Meet: Chicago vs. IowaState Teachers, Bartlett Gymnas¬ium, 8:00 P. M.Varsity Basketball Game, Chi¬cago vs. Wisconsin, Field House,8:00 P. M.Social Activitie*Tau Kappa Epsilon, Mother’s Clubbridge and dance, 9:15.SUNDAY, JANUARY 17University Religious Service, Uni¬versity Chapel, 11. The Rev. HaroldL. Bowman, D. D. The P'tMt Presby¬terian Church, Portland, Oregon,will conduct the service.Channing Club Tea, UnitarianParish House, 4. Debate: “Capital¬ism and Socialism”, Donald Beckervs. Byron Dunham.Shop TalkAdv.When ntoneyaches attack youSelect a cozy nook—Then hurry to the Bookstoreand rent a rousing book.There’s nothing like a good, live¬ly story—full of heroes who takebeing heroes Very Seriously, andheroines who like being taken VerySeriously by heroes — anyway,there’s nothing like a good, livelystory to dispel gloom and depres¬sion. And non-fiction is perhapseven more rousing and soul-stirringthan Fiction these days; there’s somuch to be said about Everything,and such a multitude of stimulatingviewpoints to study. You’ll find avery extensive collection of the new¬est Fiction and Non-fiction at theRental Library at the University ofChicago Bookstore, and the rentalfee is only 3 cents a day. New bookscan be ordered and received in aslittle as a week’s time—a real ad¬vantage over most library systems,where it takes weeks,—sometimesninths—to get the latest books.There’s a branch Rental Library atthe University College downtown,and at the Education Bookstore inBlaine "Hall. Take advantage of theRental Library for supplementaryreading in all your courses. You see.it’s all planned for your convenience.Speedy service and care and neat¬ness in handling are undoubtedly theprerequisites for GOOD CLEAN¬ING. The Cleaners Service, 1416E. 55th St., phone Midway 2800 areas fussy about your things as youwould be yourself. Everything—in¬cluding the shop—is the es.sence ofneatness and cleanliness. Dig outthe dresses and suits you’ve had putaway in the back of your closet,and take them to the Cleaners Serv¬ice TODAY! Perfect 6 hour serviceinsures their prompt return.HILL’S CAFETERIAGSrd and Woodlawn Ave.Always Reliable for your Breakfast.Lunch or Dinner.General Price Reduction inkeeping with the timet.DUKE UNIVERSITYSchool of MedicineDurham, N. C.Applications for admission to th» firstand third year medical classes enterinROctober 1, 1982 should be sent as «>,npossible, and will be considered in theorder of receipt. Ute entrance qaalifica.tions are IntelliRence, character, twoyears of colleve work and the require¬ments for srada A medical school.-. Cats,lomiee and application forms may ■" ob¬tained from the Dean.fMsT.P.says:DON’T BE LIKE KING TUT!There** no need to keep things for3000 years just because you don’t knowwhat to do with them. Text books thatyou're no longer using, or an old bask¬etball or football that's still in goodconditions wil find a quick marketamong the students. Tell them aboutit in The Trading Post. Phone HydePark 9221.WANTF;D T'vo students to sell.liclionnne.^ of 11. S- history. Justiiubli.^liod. Everyone s prtyspoct.Real opportunity for siritresfcivenuin or woman to earn steady in¬come. For i>articulars adilress Wil¬liam Mead. 5.3H S. Clark St.. Chi-catfo.WANTF.I) University irraduatowith secretarial experience in letralwork and knowl^ire of presentiHrliticnl situation in Chicano.I’ermaiicnt jKwition. Miss Robin-s«>n.FX)R RENT Stile, rm. 1st aptOuUide. I’riv. bath. I’JO t>er m.>S630 Kimliark Ave. Dorch. 29*WANTED -Cirl to teach U>dancintr on Wednesdays from 11'.to 12:16 in South Side iiirls schrMist Robinaon.WANTED Cirl to stay evciiinwith children in exchanire for mrand hoard. Miss Robinson.WANTED Experienced cashierto work for meals in South SiJ-cafeteria. Home economics studeipreferred. Miss Robinson.Enriching the LanguageyiTAMlNE, Dermutation. Halitosis.Jimmp-pipe. Neutrodyne, Ortho-phonic . . These and hundreds ofothers . . . words that have won ft placein contemporary language throughthe medium of the advertising; col¬umns.How can anyone keep up withthe times if he doesn’t read the adver¬tisements ?It is often said that the advertise¬ments offer a liberal education. Thenew electrical appliances that take thedrudgery out of housework first sawthe light of day in the advertising col¬umns. A vegetable substitute fbr silkis discovered, and you hear about itfirst through an advertisement.What are the new models in mo¬tor cars? The advertisements tell you,before you go to the auto show.What’s the best show in town? What’sthe newest in hats and shoes and golf-togs? Consult the advertisements.That’s the w§iy to keep up with thetimes. Tliat’s the way to make thefamily budget go farther.Read the advertisements in thispaper regularly. The big ones and thelittle ones. Search them through forvalues you might otherwise neverknow about.By Becoming a regular reader of theadvertising columns, you becomea well informed person.