Vol. 25. No. IUNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 25. 1925Price 5 CentsMASON WELCOMES FROSH TODAYWork Begins on Chapel; Medical Group RisesEIGHTEEN STORYTOWER TO RISEABOVE CHAPELModem Equipment AidsWork On MedicalBuildingsConstruction work has been pro¬gressing for nearly a month on theUniversity’s new $1,700,000 chapel,the only building on the campusfinanced solely by Mr. John D. Rock¬efeller, and which is located on theporner of Woodlawn Avenue and 59thStreet. At simple ceremonies lastAugust, featured by an address byVice-President James H. Tufts, thefirst sod was turned by Howard G.Grey, vice-president of the board oflirectors who operated the giant steamshovel.In the Medical group, the shellworkhas been completed up to and incluv-ing the third floor on the Physiolog¬ical and Physiological-Chemical build-ngs. The Administration, MedicalAnd Surgical buildings are also pro¬gressing rapidly, with the founda¬tions, basement and sub-basement fin¬ished. and work ready to proceed onjibe first floor. The other structures,including the Pharmocological and thePathological buildings, have beenBtarted.Limestone ExteriorThe chapel is to stand in the squarebounded by 59th Street, WoodlavnAvenue, 58th 'Street, and UniversityAvenue, and with auxiliary buildingsnot yet definitely planned, will occu¬py practically the entire square. Itsexterior is to be of limestone, beauti¬fully ornamented with sculptured fig¬ures of more than life size.The tower, which will equal inheight to an average eighteen storyloop building, will be visible from thelake, the parks, and from points with¬in a radius of many miles. Whenrompleted, the chapel will be used forall gatherings of the University ap¬propriate to it.Give DimensionsSome of the interesting featuresllustrative of the gigantic size of thelew chapel are as follows:A nave, with aisles, 74 feet wide;(Continued on page 4)Navy Head PraisesMason’s War ServiceIn acknowledgement of the im¬portance of the scientific workwhich President Max Mason per¬formed during the World Warthrough his invention of a deviceto detect submarines, Josephu*Daniels, wartime Secretary of theNavy, has made the followingstatement emphasizing the impor¬tance of Mr. Mason’s invention:“It is doubtful if any man Inthe World War rendered a servicequite so valuable. From the daythe U boats sank the first ship,scientists and inventors in all theallied nations sought to invent aninstrument to detect submarines.As long as there was no way tolocate them, they could easilycarry on their policy! of assass¬ination. It was the paramountneed and when the n*ral staff atNew London saw that Dr. Masonhad found the key, it vas as if ageneral had won i decisivebattle.”ADD SIXTY nWTO FACULTY LISTAppointees TsJce Posts OnOctober First.COACH STAGG TOMEET FRESHMANCLASS TOMORROWOfficial StudentHandbook MakesFreshman DebutCouncil Sponsors Meeting;Practice GameFollowsW. A. A. Sponsor*Frosh Riding PartyA trip along the bride paths of theMidway and Jackson Park on Mondayat 4:30 will be offered to the first(fifteen freshmen women to sign up on^he posters in the foyer of Ida Noyesall. The women who sign up will benests of W. A. A., and must be ex-jrienced riders.The ride Monday will be the first’ many equestrian activities to be>onsored by W. A. A. during theiming quarter, according to Eleanorish, president of the organization,lasses in horsemanship will be heldtis year at last, with fifteen womeneach class and a fee of seventy-fivents an hour. A four grade systemill be established in the classes whichill include separate grades for be-nning, intermediate, advanced and:perienced riders.Another innovation in the eques-ian classes this fall will be thersemanship test which every womantending to enter the intermediate,Ivanced or experienced classes will! required to pass. The test will in-ude mounting, dismounting, can¬ring, trotting and walking, and es-cial attention will be paid to form.With the opening of the fall quar¬ter, sixty-four new instructors andprofessors assume posts In the vari¬ous departments of the university.Some of them were appointed as muchas a year ago but the anointmentswere made effective for October 1st.Following are the names of the ap¬pointees, as announced by the boardof trustees:William A. Craigie, Pnofessor ofEnglish Language in the Apartmentof English; Bernadotte E. Schmitt,Professor in the department of His¬tory; George Gleason Bogeik. ActingProfessor in the Law School; Benja¬min O. Foster, Visiting Professor inthe department of Latin, Dr. GeorgeM. Curtis, Associate Professor of Sur¬gery, Lester R. Dragstedt, AssociateProfessor of Surgery; Hazel Kyrk,Associate Professor in the departmentof Home Economics and Householdadministration; Edward Sapir, As¬sociate professor in the department ofSociology; Junius C. Gregory, (Assist-(Continued on page 6)Coach A. A. Stagg will address theUniversity at a gigantic mass meet¬ing to be held in Mandel hall Satur¬day afternoon at 2:30, under the aus¬pices of the Undergraduate council.“The purpose of this meeting is prin¬cipally to acquaint the freshmen withthe athletic activities of the Univer¬sity and attempt to inspire them withChicago school spirit,” said CharlesAnderson, president of the council,“but all students are cordially askedto be present.”The meeting will be immediatelyfollowed by a practice football gamebetween two squads of the Varsity,which will take place on Stagg fieldat 3:30.At 5:00 there will be a huge mixeron the entire main floor of the Reyn¬olds club, at which the upperclassmenwill act as hosts to fhe Freshman.men"V trojnen. *On Sunday night at 7:00, the Un¬dergraduate council will stage a rnu-sicale for Freshman men and womenin Ida Noyes hall. Members of theGlee Club, Mr. Mack Evans and Nel¬son Fuqua will be on the program.Clyde Keutzer, leading lady of “Kaitifrom Haiti,” will be present and willsing several Blackfriars songs.With the beginning of the newa-ademic year, the 1925-26 C HandLook of the University, publishedand sold by the Y. M. C. A., hasmade its appearance on the Campus.The new book combines the per¬manent features of past manualswith several new features introducedby the staff. In it are included aphotograph of the late PresidentBurton; a greeting to the incomingstudents by James Hayden Tufts,vice-president of the University andDean of the faculties; descriptionsof the numerous campus organiza¬tions and publications; rushing rulesfor fraternities; a section on Athlet¬ics; words to songs and yells; thecalendar and a diagram of the cam¬pus.The hand book may be purchasedfor twenty-five cents at the Univer¬sity of Chicago book store, Wood¬worth’s book store, Mandel Cloister,and from members of the staff.Dean Urges FroshTo UtilizeUniversityErnest Hatch Wilkins, Dean ofthe Colleges of Arts, Literature andScience, welcomes the new studentsto the University in the followingstatement: “The University of Chi¬cago welcomes you most heartily.We think you have before you achance for a finer a^d more valuablecollege education than any otherclass ever had, and we hope thatyou will get that education thor¬oughly and will have the best kindof a good time while you are get¬ting it.” Ernest Hatch Wilkins.Son of Prof. Howland JoinsExpedition to Ancient MegiddoBOARD REPUCES~ DUN OF WOMENMrs. Flint to Head NewExecutive CouncilGeorge F. Howland, son off Prof.George C. Howland, of the l)niver-sity, and a grandson of John A.Roche, once mayor of Chicago, hasbecome a member of the expeditionwhich the Oriental Institute of theUniversity is sending this year toexplore the site of ancient Megiddo,or Armageddon. The younger How¬land has been a lieutenant in theUnited States Navy. His interestin archeology has become so greatthat he recently resigned from thenavy with a view to helping in agreat task of discovery instead ofcruising on a battleship.Breasted Heads GroupWith the addition of Mr. Howland, the Oriental Institute expedi¬tion, headed by Prof. James H.Breasted, will consist of six Ameri¬cans, of whom the chief, under ffrof.Breasted, is Professor ClarkjiceFisher, of the University of Penatyl-vania, Dr. D. F. Higgins, of t.V>A Miniversity and E. L. DeLoach, geologist,will be among other members of theparty. There will also be six na¬tive foremen to boss the army ofnative diggers.Work on HeadquartersProf. Breasted is sailing for Eng¬land in a few days, and will leavethere for the Near East in Novem¬ber. Because of the torrential rainscommon in that region in the winter,it is expected that excavation willbe delayed until spring. Meantimework will go forward on the housewhich will be headquarters for theparty, to be built on the shopes be¬low the town of Tel-el-Mutesellim,as Megiddo is now called. The build¬ing will contain dormitories, offices,storage facilities, etc. The UnitedGypsum company has donated 20,-000 square feet of sheet rock forthe construction, and Sears, Roe¬buck and Co. have provided furnish¬ings gratis.In accordance with the effort ofthe University to emphasize co-erative methods of dealing with edu¬cational problems a re-organizedand more extensive post of dean ofwomen will be innovated Oct. 1. Awomen’s council, compose# of aboutfifteen women holding administra¬tive positions, and an executivecommittee of three will deal withproblems formerly under the juris¬diction of Miss Marion Talbot, re¬tired dean of women. Mrs. EdithFoster Flint, Professor in the de¬partment of English, and a dean inthe colleges, will be Chairman ofthe Council.Favor Co-operative Policy“In view of the approaching re¬tirement of Miss Talbot last spring,the question was raised whether atthis time there might be taken somefurther step in advance which wouldconserve the valuable organizationworked out by Dean Talbot, andwhich should perhaps secure a widerparticipation by women members ofthe faculty in dealing with the vari¬ous problems affecting women stu¬dents. The committee in charge be¬lieves that the council plan will takecare of the complex questions, edu¬cational, social, and athletic thathave arisen, and that it is also astep in the direction of co-operative,rather than individual administra¬tion,” according to Vice PresidentJames H. Tufts.PRESIDENT ADDRESSES750 IN MANDEL HALLRegistration Starts at 9:30; University GivesReception for Freshmen and ParentsTonight in Ida Noyes HallFrom the President:I wish to extend to the classof 1929 a cordial welcome to thelife of the University of Chi¬cago. You and I are enteringthis great family at the sametime. You will find, as I havefound, that the spirit of Chicagois that of deep friendliness. Youand I are meeting, this year,greater responsibilities than wehave ever met before. Let usmeet them with courage and highhopes.MAX MASON.Class Tickets ReadyFor Students TodayUpper classmen who made a tenta¬tive registration last spring and arenot planning to make any change inregistration can and should get theirclass tickets today or tomorrow at theBureau of Records. They will savethemselves and others a great deal oltime and trouble if they will do this;for on Monday all tickets will betaken over to Bartlett Gym, where thegeneral registration will be going onand it will take much longer to getthe tickets there.Bureau of RecordsThe Freshman Week program, be¬ginning today and lasting untilThursday, October 1, runs as fol¬lows:Friday, September 25.8:30 A. M.—General meeting of allentering freshmen (attendance re¬quired). Leon Mandel Assembly hall.9:30 A. M.—Registration (attend¬ance required).1. Students desiring to register inthe Colleges of Arts, Literature, andScience, having course books num¬bered 1—250, will remain for regis¬tration in Leon Mandel Assembly hall.2. All students desiring to registerin the College of Commerce and Ad¬ministration will report for registra¬tion in Room 105, Commerce and Ad¬ministration hall. At this meetingthe aims and ideals of the school willbe discussed by Dean Spencer, the de¬tails of the procedure of registrationwill be arranged, and the programfor entering students during the daysuntil classes meet will be explained.3. All students who wish to regis¬ter in the College of Education willreport to Room 100, Emmons Blainehall.(Continued on page 5)City Must HelpUniversity—MasonGetting acquainted with the Uni¬versity has been the aim of PresidentMason during the five days which hehas spent on campus. Dr. Mason hasspent on campus. Dr. Mason hasbeen studying faculty reports andhas been general work in orienta¬tion. “The first important thing todo in order to vizualize the hopesof the future is to mesh in with theother agencies of cooperation,” saidDi. Mason in an interview yesterday.“The future of the University isvery much at stake,” President Ma¬son continued, “and the next yearor two will decide what it will be.The endowment plan is just as vitaland probably more vital than thebuilding campaign. The primary fac¬tor is the degree to which Chicagoas a city will conceive this institu¬tion as a local enterprise, and takepride in having such a splendid Uni¬versity in its midst.”The University is a university in(Continued on £age 3)President Max Mason will make hisfirst public address to the students inthe University when he officially wel¬comes the incoming Freshman classtoday. Seven hundred and fiftyfreshmen, who are also making theirfirst appearance as members of theUniversity, will assemble in Mandelhall at 8:30 in the first required meet¬ing for their class.Dean Ernest Hatch Wilkins, whoconceived the idea of having PresidentMason make his first speech to thenew members of the University, re¬ceived a letter of approval from thePresident, in which he said he wouldbe only too glad to follow out the sug¬gestion. President Mason, who willofficially take his office October 1, theopening day of school, is a graduateof the University of Wisconsin, andhas held a professorship in mathemat¬ical physics since 1908. His inven¬tion of the submarine detector and hissubsequent work in the Navy depart¬ment of this country and Great Brit¬ain has won him fame and praisefrom naval executives, educators, sci¬entists, and men in every walk of life.Anderson to SpeakCharles Anderson, president of theUndergraduate council, i6 to speakto the freshmen in behalf of the coun¬cil, and to give them a welcome fromthe student body. Dean Wilkins willgive a few details of the plan forFreshman Week, and instructionsconcerning the various required meet¬ings and examinations.Hold Frosh ReceptionFollowing the meeting, registrationfor freshmen will begin at 9:30 andcontinue all day. Tonight at 8, inIda Noyes hall, the new students willbe the guests of the University at areception held in their honor. Fresh¬men are urged to invite their parentsto be present at the reception. In thereceiving line will be President andMrs. Max Mason, Vice-President andMrs. James Hayden Tufts, Vice-President and Mrs. Trevor Arnett,Dean and Mrs. Ernest Hatch Wilkins,Dean Edith Foster Flint, Mrs. GeorgeSpenser Goodspeed, and Dean W. S.Gray.ASSIGN FRESHMEN TOROOMS FOR TESTSIN ENGLISHThe schedule for the English testrequired of all entering freshmen isas follows:Students in Arts, Literature, andScience with course books numberedfrom 1 to 350 will take the test inKent theatre. Those with booksfrom 351 to 525 will take the test inRosenwald 2. Those with booksfrom 526 to 675 will be given thetest in Cobb 110, and those num¬bered above 675 at Classics 10. Allstudents in the School of Commerceand Administration and the Schoolof Education will take the test inKent lecture room.This test comes at 2 o’clock, Mon¬day afternoon.The students who do best,test will be exempted \1. Others will beor lower sectionsgrade : f theirID AY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1925THE DAILY MARCMack Evatis isNew UniversityChoir MeddWelcome FreshmenOne Hundred Salespeople ToCanvas University Cam¬pus; Prices SameTrial Exams Used Last YearProve MethodEffective^ U,H‘^ Psychological .-.te>ts, college and has taken work in thepersonal attention from a,, staff of department of music ilarvarcdeans and adxicors and talks to umversitx where he' was a graduateintroduce the incoming freshmen, to stud(/nt ' Voi SOme time he serveecol ege life are expected to reduce as orP.anj8^ af a church located orthe number of failures among first the riortH side 0f Chicago !' ' students at the;' University to -mder nn direction I hope thatless than fixe per cent, compared the ohoir mav H. developed,” safexvtth. an average of 25 per cent for Mr E,ans - and , ,ha„ try to imthe entire country, according to a prov4 upon the musical service remt nt by Kroest -1 fa Wilkins all the exercises m wbicii I have idean of the colleges. -part”The inauguration last yea. nf Trvout. the University. chd,‘‘hreshman Week was ore of the , . . . g, . , , , , which is open to all students will bechief; factors in reducing the nuni- , , . ; .. , . held in Mitchell towerher of first year failures to nve per .cent of the class and. according to .I b an Wilkin.". a : h. r drop inthis percentage mav he expected 1|U Jl IT|^f ID A TI« DA HI Awith the improved methods to be 1C Itillsli/put into practice next Friday.Th.r.,.„. Dir«.. t«„. SCHEDULE HEREIntelligence tests, given under the ■ vdirection of Prof. L. L.-Thurstone of TTTliCIYAVthe department of psychology, will TUIlljlJ/lT "again be used to supplement the highschool records and personal informa-•tioh "blanks of the freshmen. Those'; With a short talk, indicating plan-tests, which last year were employed for broadcasting both unified lectunin fifty colleges and .■-..universities course" and special .programs, Presthroughout the .country, have been ident Max Mason, new head of th<revised hv Prof Thurstone in the Imiversitv, is scheduled to inaugurlight of the subsequent records of ate on Tuesday, Oct. &, the seconcthe,pupils to whom these were admin- year of the umversitx’." radio studitistered. in Mitchell towerOf twenty who received honor Weekly talks mi current literaturescholarships foi the ' est '• scholastic accounts of the newest -discoveriesrecords, during dhe first year, nine in science, and a series of lecture-w.ere ranked 'among the upper third emphasizing the close relation beof. the class by the intellitrenve,tests.Fourmore, placed ;n the upper half.The other thirteen did not take thenpsychological examination.Tests Match ResultsAt the other end of the stalelikewise, there was a general carrec-pondence between the rating of theintelligence te-ts. and the scholastic]stnding of the freshmen Nineteen 1students were given the lowest pos- ;sible rating on k >•. al* ten. Four¬teen of these failed and wen di. -missed during the first year, one wasallowed to remain on probation,;:and"»l.v ‘"u" li,,! satisfactory work.-Ii be in ;u, v t. the arrange-'is planned to revise the tests un’il 111(-ntsthey gixe a much moie aecur,.*- Napier Wilt of the Englishprophecy of individual ability, hut department, will review the fall thethe results of the experimental first atir|cai season in Chicago in a-talkxear uer. considered -ati-factory by on Thursday. (b t. s Hi" speech i" .university .authorities. .• • ho tir^t of a regular .Thursday night,\ staff of twelxe dean-, assisted; series, which is planned to include a.' ' ' ' ” ' ■ - • I- y". ' '/'A i v.Uf'te student.", will give personal at- discussions of/various trends of cur-prohlems of the in- ront literature,turning student-^ and will follow this In accordance with it" policywork with consultation" .hmughout broadcasting special events, the Fni-the xear. Dean Wilkin-. who in- cersity will feature the programs ofi*(d the system two -years" ago, t|1(. citizenship school which thestated, ye-terday , that . the policy of Illinois League of Women Voter.-,individual attention tor each., fte-h- wi,j t.nnduct at the Universitx Oct.‘s- ' ‘ larcri-lx esponsihle for 1;$' t() lb Mrs. Katherine Mancockthe shaip decrease in the number of Goo'de, woman member of the state“fl.unkers legislature, isscheduled for an ad-Failures were reduced fiom <ix- dress at K::><> Wednesday evening,te'en to■ eight per cent in the fir-t Oct. 14 ' She xvilLdiscusse the rela-'The annual Daily Maroon subscrip¬tion drive begins today under the su¬pervision of Sidney Bloomenlhal, Cir¬culation director of the Maroon. Cam--pusVsalespeople: whmf number1 aboutone hundred" wear tags and will askentering freshmen to subscribe, thussaving the newcomers the trip to Ellishally 'Subscribers will receive cardsentitling them to copies of the Maroon-upon; presentation at either Ellis, IdaNoyes, or Reynolds dob, but at notmore than one place each day. Theraie for such subscriptions is $3.00, ayyear.and .$1.00, aquarter.;? % ». ,The mailing and delivery service ofHhf,paper will retain its usual effici¬ency during the coming . year, andfreshmen .who' live .,in. dormitories ?rrfraternity houses are encouraged to-make tiseApf ithe, free delivery serviceof the Maroon. Although postal rates• have gone,,up, the price of mailed sub-- script ions remains the: same as, lastyear, $4.00 a year,*. $2.00, a quarter.Officials of the Chicago postoffice havepromised that : papers destined for(’hicago usbscrihers xvill reach theirdestination within a few hours aftermailing.Any freshman whom ,a.„.salespersonfails to approach is urged to filkoutand.bring to the Maroon-office thesubscription blank printed on pagethree. If more convenient, the boxin faculty exchange may be used. TheDaily Maroon circulationdepartmentis anxious to see'the name of everytween the city and the univeidv fn.«hman in it" subscription til.'"will feature the succeeding pr- . ',. , , . . : , " If anv freshmen desire to^ sell sub-which are to represent all phase-, of . . • *• - to he fellows, .he is requested,.umxersitx actixitx. according toV : . d ; L ... , • to report to Philip Kaus who is as-thosc- in charge. The". lectures are . .Is Right On the CampusSecond HandComplete line of uaw, Medical, Text BooksYour choice of the new iniiiodem fiction, poetry, essaysSTATIONERY SUPPLIESTYPEWRITERS; ALL MAKESNEW -- FOR RENTPortablesRemingtonCoronaUnderwoodNOTEBOOKS : : FOUNTA^ sS11 PAPERM PENCILS : : INKYour FirstDay in a,.MemoryBook./,,StatiaieryFor i hatF irst .etterRivals the bcaiitu of.It Takes aLoad off theStudent’sMindAbo t YourPrices RangeFrom $l-$5IT doesn’t require a four-.years’exposure to well-in¬formed circles hereabouts tograsp the hearty sanction of/Parker Duofold craftsmanship- tamong the older students.Those who know its 25-yearpoin t, Man-size Grip andOyer-size Ink Capacity have come to .depend on it in overwhelming /majorities everywhere, butnowhere more than in the' colleges. . ‘ "Good pen counters wouldn’tbe without it—stop at the near¬est one. /J ;THE PARKER PEN COMPANYFactory and General OfficesJANESyiLLiE, WIS.GYM GOODSpe/nantsPI1FOWSHERE IS THE FROSHASSIGNMENT TODEANSBiMNERSFor , the finishingtouchFreshmen in th, schools,of Arts,Literature Land Sck nee xvill be as-signed to dears as.'foilMen in the School of Ari- .n.dLiterature whose- last. names b< ■ ixvith letters:A to E—Dean Forrest A Kings¬bury.■ F .to K -Dean Paul McClintock. .L to R—Dean John Foote Norton" to Z- Dear. Thomas Vern Smith.Men in the school of Science.A to K—-Dean Warder Clyde AlewL to Z Dean John William Ed¬ward (i 1 at t field.Women in the Schools of Arts and.Literature;/ A’ to F—Dean Sophonisba PrestonBreckenridge.Dean Edith Foster Flint^Pgjra^KffeMean Elizabeth Wallace.:®he school of Science:Frances Elma Gil-our roomSHOES : TRUNKSSHIRT'S : SOCKS. MIDDIES : . BLOOMERS.0 UdyDuofeU>Ssize With ring for chatelaineANYTHING EVERYTHING YOU WANTTwo English ScholarsTo Matriculate HereELLIS HALLi (58th and Ellis)nL Book Store: 106 Blaine Hall.Thomas- Asgood of St." Andrewsand Cambridge universities and JohnWilliamson of St. Andrew and theUniversity of Edinburgh are ex¬pected to arrive next week fromIMPERFE-* . : -TT"THE. LAY-OF THE LANDZ\ft Vniberfttp of CfjitugoKEV TO buildings1 Cobb Lectuft H*4 31 Grandstand2 Blake Halt3 Gates Hall4 Goodspeed Hall5 Classics6 Harper Memorial Library7 Foster Hall8 Kelly Hall9 Green Hall10 Beecher Hall11 Walker Museum12 RosenwaId Hall13 law School14 Haskett Museum15 Divinity Chapel16 Theology32 Snell Ha*<33 Kent Chemical laboratory'34 University Press35 Ricketts Laboratory—South36 Psychological Laboratory37 Ricketts laboratory38 Power Plant39 Shops and Storehouse40 Experimental Zoology41 Physiology and Physiolotf-42 Ellis Hall'43 Botany Greenhouses44 Billings Hospital and Medi-_ r cal School17 Ryerson Physical laboratory 45 Drexel House18 Leon Mandel Assembly Hell 46 President's House19 Co operative Nursery20 Quadrangle Club21 Reynolds Clubhouse22 Mitchell Tower23 Bartlett Gymnasium24 Athletic Held House25 Hutchinson Had26 Zoology27 Botany28 Physiology29 Anatomy30 Hitchcock Hall47 Lexington Hall48 Commerce and Administra¬tion Hall49 French House50 Wood lawn House51 University Chapel52 Ida Noyes Hall53 Emmons Blame Hall54 High-School Boys’ Club55 High-School Gymnasium56 Kimbark Hall57 Belfteld Hall58 Kenwood House5817-31 Kenwood Avenue59 Social Research975 CMY Sixtieth Street60 Greenwood Hell6030 Greenwood AvenueifetnpJnCOBB HALL IS JUST where this map shows it; so is Rosenwald. New students ought to beable to find their way from class to class without being puzzled, if they carry this with them.5V'pettyWesCITY MUST HELPUNIVERSITY—MASON(Continued from page 1)the truest .iense of the word,4accord¬ing to Dr. Mason. “We must lookat it as sponsoring the highest kindof productive work since it teachesfachers. The University holds ammanding position equal to thatof Chicago; the city industrially, theUniversity, educationally.“The William Rainey Harpertype of excellence must be pre¬served,” said President Mason. Eightuniversity presidents resigned towork under President Harper, andwe must maintain that height of ex¬cellence.”FRESHMEN: Your complete campus guideis the ‘C HANDBOOK, now on sale at bothbookstores. A campus necessity.Er,...r..U-T|3Henry CLytton § SonsSTATE at JACKSON—CHICAGOIn the Lytton College ShopIN a separate room—distinctly apart from the rest of our greatyoung men’s floor—The Lytton College Shop has become avery definite factor in the eyes of college men. Catering exclu¬sively to their wishes—in an atmosphere as individual as thesmallest shop—it has introduced the last word in Clothescorrectness with the accompanying economies that our greatvolume of business permits.ii irrxxxin r.YmiimTmrrriniiiu urrxx nxnmrNew York Shopat Fifth Ave. and36th St.eafu rinq aIn faiije or satin! Really a marvelousvalve at such a low price. Tailored withthat meticulous care and strict attentionto perfect details that usually only char¬acterize a frock at a decidedly higherprice. In the new autumn shades.Women’s and misses’ sizes.65-67E.MADISON St. ^Wilson*/ Sheridanfevanrfon Shop in 'The Orrirujton Hotel^IsOi se heads wear Stetson hats— they look well and last long.Do you wear a Stetson?STETSON HATSStyled for young menrPage Fourth£ d^ily Maroon, Friday, September 25, 1923cUhr lath) ilyomtFOUNDED in 1901"THE OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGOPublished mornings, except Saturday, Sunday and Monday, during the Autumn,Winter and Spring quarters by The Daily Maroon Company. Subscription rates:$3.00 per year; by mail, $1.00 per year extra. Single copies, five cents each.Entered as second-class mail at the Chicago Postoffice, Chicago, Illinois, March 13,1906. under the act of March 3, 1873.The Daily Maroon expressly reserves all rights of publication of any materialappearing in this paper.OFFICE—ROOM ONE, ELLIS HALL5804 Ellis AvenueTelephones: Editorial Office, Midway 0800, Local 245; Business Office,Fairfax 5522! Sports Office, Local 80, 2 RingsThe Daily Maroon solicits the expression of student opinion in its columns on allsubjects of student interest. Contributors must sign their full names to communica¬tions, but publication will, upon request, be anonymous.Member of the Western Conference Press AssociationThe StaffAllen ffeald, EditorMilton Kauffman, Managing EditorThomas R. Mulroy, Business ManagerEDITORIAL DEPARTMENTC. V. Winner, Jr SportsGertrude Bromberg Women'sDeemer Lee NewsReese Price NewsWalter Williamson NewsCharles Gaskill, .. Assistant SportsHarry Schlaes .... Assistant SportsVictor Theis Assistant SportsJanet Stout Women's SportsMarjorie Cooper, Assistant Women’siRuth Daniels .. Assistant Women'sEditorEditorEditorEditorEditorEditorEditorEditorEditorEditorEditorBUSINESS DEPARTMENTSidney Bloomenthal, Circulation DirectorEtlian Granquist Office DirectorLeland Neff Advertising DirectorMilton Kreines Local Adv. ManagerThomas Field Copy ManagerJack Pincus Classified ManagerPhilip Kaus Circulation ManagerHOWDY, ’29.TO YOU who come here this fall for the first time, The DailyMaroon sends its heartiest greeting. We are glad to have newreaders. We shall be glad to have new members of our staff. Weare glad, every one of us, to have new classmates, fresh headspuzzling over the same stiff courses that have kept us busy, newvoices yelling at the football games, additions to the crowd in frontof Cobb hall.We welcome you: we stand ready to help you when you needhelp, and to advise you when you need advice; and especially, wewant to be your friends. We won’t try to initiate you. No plansare afoot for ducking you in the Botany pond. We upperclassmenwill not undertake to make you behave; you know how already,about as well as we do. We are only three years your elders, atthe most. Learn from your instructors, not from us.We can help you in many things; so can you help us. We haveno monopoly on good ideas. If you think you know how to im¬prove our colleges, tell us your scheme. Be courteous about it, ofcourse; don’t monopolize the floor; and be ready to see a joke whenit is on you. Anybody has to observe those proprieties. If youridea is bad, we will tell you so, but think no less of you.Of course, some of you are habitually ill-mannered, or egotis¬tical. We will make it hot for them. We would make it hot forthem, though they were seniors, or Ph. D’s. They must be cured,if they are to get along here—or anywheii*'else. On the contrary,we are sometimes ill-mannered ourselves. When we are, make itequally hot for us.We are going to be together for a while. We will study thesame books, listen to the same professors, root for the same foot¬ball team, love the same Alma Mater. There is no use for anyof us to be uppish and patronizing, or submissive and bashful. Wecan all serve each other; we can all gain something from eachother. Let’s do it.CHICAGO MILITANT.THE UNIVERSITY begins the year 1925-26 with good auspices.A new president, a young man with achievements already be¬hind him, takes its helm. Two new buildings are near completion;ground has been broken for the chapel, the University’s great arch¬itectural triumph; the Autumn quarter will see the beginning ofWieboldt hall, the Modern Language building; Billings hospital andthe extensive medical group are rising fast.Max Mason has made his mark as a scholar, an administrator,and a patriot. He has made important contributions to science, hehas made an invention that saved thousands of lives; he has direct¬ed the activities of a corps of technicians in the war; he has taughtwith success in a great university. Now he comes here, to continuethe stupendous job—the program of development—planned andbegun by the late President Burton.Great difficulties must be surmounted, before that job is fin¬ished. Millions must be raised—and more millions. And onceraised, they must be spent. The most serviceable University possi¬ble must be built, with their aid. President Mason, the faculty, andthe trustees, have such a task ahead of them. Will they succeed?✓We can only point to what President Mason has done, and whatAnderson ExtendsCouncil Greetingsto New StudentsGreetings:The Undergraduate council, rep¬resenting the student body of theUniversity, extends a cordial wel¬come to the class of ’29. You areenrolled mi the greatest university inthe worl^and we urge you to takeevery advantage of the privilegesand opportunities offered to stu¬dents here.We urge that you learn of theachievements of the University, inthe classromm, in the laboratory, andon the athletic field. We urge thatyou get to know as many of your fel¬low classmen as possible and thatyou make it a point to become ac¬quainted with your dean and yourinstructors and to regard them asyour friends. We suggest that youread the student publications andthat you spend as much of your timeas possible on campus in order thatyou may become familiar with allparts of campus life.We congratulate you upon thechoice of the University as yourAlma Mater.Charles B. Anderson,President, Undergraduate Council.GIVE SCHEDULES FORPSYCHOLOGICALTESTSFreshmen in Arts, Literature, andScience with course books numberedfrom 1 to 450 will take the psycho¬logical test from 2 to 4 on Tuesday.Those who have books mlmbered451 and higher, and all freshmen inthe School of Commerce and Admin¬istration and the College of Educa¬tion will take the test from 4 to 6on Tuesday.A. L. S. students who have coursebooks numbered from 1 to 200 andfrom 451 to 650 will take the testin Kent theatre. Those with coursebooks from 201 to 300, and all stu¬dents of the Schools of Educationand Commerce and Administrationwill take the test at Rosenwald 2.A. L. S. students with course books301 to 360 and above 740 will takethe test in Classics 10. Those withcourse books 361 to 450, and 651 to740, will take the test in Ryerson32.EIGHTEEN STORY TOWERTO RISE ABOVE CHAPEL(Continued from page 1)above the floor; three great archesa vaulted ceiling with crown 75 feeton the sides elevation, and a seatingcapacity of 2,100 people. In orderto effect this large seating capacity,the width of the nave between pierswill be 41 feet, which is wider thanthe span of any cathedral in thoworld.Use Modern EquipmentIn the Medical group, with favor¬able conditions, the roofs of the Phys¬iological and Physicological-Chemicalbuildings will probably be finished thisyear, it was announced yesterday byMr. F. C. iSturmer, Superintendentfor the William Adams Co., buildingcontractors. With approximately 275men on the job, the shellwork of theother buildings will also be run uptwo or three stories before winter.The entire group is being con¬structed after the English Gothic de¬sign, which is the same as that usedon campus now. The concrete plantwhich is being used is one of the larg¬est and most complete of any everbefore used in the construction ofcollege building, and according to Mr.Sturmer, is larger than any now be¬ing used in New York City. It isequipped with two Archer 160 footconcrete towers and one 120 towers;which are capable of spouting allconcrete, both for roof and floor, di¬rectly into place on any part of thesite.1An attractive opportunityto make good money in yourspare time selling or sendingin prospects for band, string '■and orchestral instruments isoffered by one of Chicago’sleading and best known musi- jcal instrument houses. WriteBox O, Faculty Ex.OPEN POSITIONS ONDAILY MAROON FORFROSH JOURNALISTSBy W. W. WilliamsonIt is advisable that every freshmanthink seriously of entering some oneor more activities as soon as Jus aca¬demic courses are arranged. In thejournalistic field. The Daily Maroon,the student daily newspaper offers alimited number of positions to menand women who are interested in acollege career.The editorial and business depart¬ments of The Daily Maroon offer apractical training to men and womenwho wish to exercise their writingability or enter the newspaper profes¬sion in later life.Twenty years of continual growthhas made the student daily one of thebest college newspanecs in the coun¬try. 'Students of vision have made it apractical and powerful campus force.It is customary every year to issuea call to interested students. It isunderstood, however, that the first toappear will get the available positions.Applications for reporter’s jobs willbe received in The Daily Maroon of¬fice in Ellis hall.❖Want Ads *!❖!WANTED—Back number of the Ma¬roon for February 3, 1925. Bringto the circulation office of the Maroonand receive 5 cents.LOST—A Schaeffer Jade fountainpen. Finder please return to Ma¬roon office. Reward.WOOD LAWN AVENUE, 5418. De¬lightful outside room, nicely fur¬nished, desirable location; $6 for one,$10 for two. Weaver, Fairfax 3332.TO RENT—Outside room for one ortwo men. Convenient to U. Useof piano. Call H. P. 2362 after 6 p.m.FOR SALE—Wardrobe trunk ingood condition; also furniture forapp’t. Crenshaw, 6346 S. RockwellStreet.A CASH OFFERIt may be that you knotf someone—a friend—whose home lacks the cheer and comfort that agood Piano, Player-Piano or Radio bring:. Orpossibly your spare time put to soliciting ol pros¬pects would bring profitable returns. In eithercase, it would pay you to get in touch withHARRY B. SIFF301 South Wabash Ave. Phone Harrison 1644♦♦tfhepreponderance of aSviceJsRemingtonPortableIT is tho outstanding choice of stu¬dents everywhere, because it isth? lig’ stes:, smallest, and most com¬part of ail standard keyboard por¬tal1' it icmnes. It fits in a case onlytO.it in. ;03 high. You can carry itany where and use it anywhere—andwhen not in use, you can tuck it awayin a desk drawer or bookcase. You’llfind it a great time-saver through¬out its years and years of service.Let us show you the many deci¬sive advantages of the New Reming¬ton Portable and explain our easypayment plan.UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGOBOOKSTOREREMINGTON TYPEWRITER CO.Consumers Bldg., 220 S. SUie Street,Chicago, Ill.cprice, completewith case, $60Registers withthe professorStandard KeyboardMost durable%hwrTvv,IMPERFECT ITHE DAILY MAROON, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1925Page FiveEVENTS FORFRESHMAN WEEK(Continued from page 1)t2:00 P. M.—Registration, contin¬ued (attendance required).jl. Arts, Literature, and Sciencestudents, with course books numbered251—500, Leon Mandel Assembly hall.2. Commerce and Administrationstudents as directed in the forenoon.3. School of Education students asdirected in the forenoon.8:00 P. M.—University Receptionto all Freshman students and theirparents, Ida Noyes hall.Saturday, September 26.8:30 A. M.—Registration, continued(attendance required).I 1. Arts, Literature, and ScienceStudents with course books numberedabove 500, Leon Mandel Assemblyhall.2. Commerce and Administrationstudents, in accordance with direc¬tions of Friday morning.3. College of Education students,Room 100, Emmons Blaine hall.j 2:30 P. M.—Mass meeting, LeoniMandel Assembly hall, in charge of(.he Undergraduate council.Stagg field.3:00 P. M.—Practice football game,^ 5:00-6:30 P. M. — “Mixer” for■ Freshman men and women. Reyn-»«olds clubhouse, in charge of the Un-njdergraduate council.Sunday, September 27.Students will be very welcome atthe services of the several churchest which are near the University. Lists[of these churches, with information/as to their services, will be posted in'the Reynolds clubhouse, in Ida Noyes/hall, and in Green hall.f t 2:00 P. M.—Visit to the Art Institujte, in charge of the University YMy C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Men willmeet in the Reynolds clubhousewdmen in Ida Noyes hall.(6:00 P. M.—Cafeteria supper, Ida>yes hall, for men and women.7:00 P. M.—Musicale, Ida Noyeshajll, in charge of the Undergraduatecouncil.M onday, September 28.9:00 A. M —Talk to Freshmen (at¬tendance required), “First PrinciplesCollege Life and Work,” Dean Wil-I ofl Col- %15 A. M.—Sight-seeing tours ofe University, in charge of the YC. A. and the Board of Women’9or ganizations. Men will meet in theR< ynolds clubhouse, women in IdaNoyes hall.2:00 P. M.—Test in English com¬position (attendance required)..5:00—6:00 P. M.—Ida Noyes swim¬ming tank open to Freshman women.Tv esday, September 29.i:00 A. M.—Talk to Freshmen (at¬tendance required), “The Care of theident’s Health,” Dr. Reed; “How aident Should Take Care of Hisfoney,” Mr. Moulds.10:15 A. M.—Sight-seeing tours ofle University, in charge of the Y.pf. C. A. and the Board of Women’sranizations. Men will meet in thelolds clubhouse, women in Idafoyes hall.2:00 P. M.—Psychological test (at-; idance required).5:00—6:00 P. M.—Ida Noyes swim¬ming tank open to Freshman women.8:00 P. M.—Party for Freshmanmen in the Reynolds clubhouse, inw charge of the Y. M. C. A.Party for Freshman women in IdaNoyes hall, in charge of the Board of* 'Women’s organizations.Wednesday, September 30.9:00 A. M.—Talk to Freshmen (at¬tendance required), “How to Study,”Prof. Judd.2:00 P. M. — Exhibition tennismatch, University Avenue courts.3:00 P. M.—Meeting for Freshmanwomen (attendance required), IdaNoyes hall.5:00 P. M. — Tea for Freshmanwomen, Ida Noyes hall, in charge ofthe Board of Women’s organizations.During the week, in accordancewith directions which will be given at■ the time of registration, each student■ will have, or will make appointment■ for a physical examination; and each^ktudent will go to Harper MemorialVibrary and be instructed in the useTHE STORE FOR MEN ®□□□□□□□□□□ □□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□y U n n38□□n□□□The CampusWith Raw-EdgedSnap-down BrimAvailable in shades of pearland tan, $8.Golf CapsOf imported woolens insmall eight-quarter shapewith flat visor, $2.50 to $5.Oxford ShirtsWith Collars AttachedOf fine quality fabric, care¬fully tailored, $2.75.Other collar-attachedshirts in broadcloth,flannel,madras.FIRST FLOORFlannel RobesNew models, in kimonostyle — pastel and brightblazer stripes, $15 to $35.Silk Dressing GownsFOURTH FLOORSweatersLarge assortment—slip¬overs and jackets—hun¬dreds of patterns and colors,alsoplain white,$8.50to$20.Cape Suede Leather JacketsIn Colors, $25Others, $16.50FOURTH FLOORHandkerchiefsOf Soft French LinenWith hand-rolled edges andcorded borders in a varietyof patterns, white, 75c.PajamasIn Popular Slip-Over StyleOf exceptionally fine mer¬cerized cotton in solid colorsand white, $3; of broad¬cloth, $4.FIRST FLOOR□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□nLi□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□a□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□n□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□n□□□□□□□□n□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□Clothesand Accessories forThe Return to CollegeKEEPING accurately informed on what is cor-rect and acceptable at the leading colleges anduniversities throughout the country, we provideexceptionally large assortments to select from, atprices gauged to win the good will and continuingpatronage of college men.Hand-Tailored SuitsThe Bowl — our own exclusive three-button model—has astraight-lined coat with all curves reduced to the barestminimum. In rough cheviots, light and dark—tans, grays,blues.The Rookery—our smart two-button suit—may be had witheither the wide double-breasted lapels or the notched type.It has a soft-rolled front and straight, plain back.The Savile—double-breasted model with wide shoulders andnarrow hips. In oxford grays and dark blue.Tuxedo and Full Dress SuitsTHIRD FLOORTopcoats and OvercoatsLarge assortment of topcoats, imported and domestic,including our own Raynorshine, shower-proofed. Amongovercoats, our Stadium model —wide shouldered, plain-backed, long-skirted—has met with special favor.Raccoon Coats—Dyed Lamb Coats—Colored SlickersFOURTH FLOORFour-in-HandsIn Vivid Wide StripesBrilliant combinations inregimental and club stripes,rep, $1.50 and $2; Frenchmoires, $3.50. Others inmodernist all-over designs.Bow Ties, $1 and $2Street GlovesOf fine African peccary skin,imported, $5.Leather and Sport Belts$1.50FIRST FLOORUnderwearAthletic Union Suits inevery suitable fabric, includ¬ing silk and linen.Track Pants, 85c to $1.50. g, f Pull-over Track Shirts, 85cAthletic Shirts, $1 to $2' 3^ 9 f SECOND FLOOR□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□D□□□□□D□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□n□□□□□□□□□□n□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□Fancy Wool HoseIn New DesignsNew versions cf the plaid,check, and diamond designsin fine imported Wool Hose,$3.50 to $5.Fancy lisle hose, imported,many patterns and colors,$1.50 to $2.Imported Golf Hosefrom $5 upFIRST FLOORFall OxfordsThe wide trousers demandwider toes on the shoes toconform to them. Manysmart models here to choosefrom, in smooth calf andgrained leathers, $8.50 to$14.50.SECOND FLOOR□ □□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□"]□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□MARSHALL FIELD & COMPANY/Page SixTHE DAILY MAROON, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 25, 1925CALL SIXTY FOURTO TEACH HERE(Continued from page 1)ant Clinical Professor (Military Medi¬cine) in Rush Medical College; Ray¬mond B. Harriman, Visiting Assist¬ant Professor in the department ofLatin; Floyd House, Assistant pro¬fessor in the department of Sociology;Dr. C. Philip Miller, of the Rockefel¬ler Institute for Medical Research.Assistant Professor, of Medicine;Chester M. Van Allen, Assistant pro¬fessor of Surgery; Raymond W. Bar¬nard, Instructor in the Departmentof Mathematics; G. M. Dack, Instruc¬tor in the department of Hygiene andBacteriology; Alfred Paul Dorjahn,Instructor in the department ofGreek; Edward F. Rothschild, In¬structor in the department of Art;W. B. Sanders, Instructor in theschool of 'Social Service administra¬tion; Harry Eugene Kelly, Lectureron Medical Jurisprudence in RushMedical college; B. M. Squires, Les-turer in the department of PoliticalEconomy; Goldie Lou Belcher, teach¬er in the elementary school of theSchool of Education; Howard Wilson,teacher in the high school of the schoolof Education; C. S. Palmer, researchassociate in the department of Chem¬istry; R. S. Vose, research associatein the department of Chemistry; Ed¬ward Buckman, clinical associate inthe department of Surgery in RushMedical College; Kenneth H. Collins,Associate in the department of Phar¬macology; Leo Clifford Clowes, clini¬cal assistant in the department o*Medicine in Rush Medical College;William John Gallagher, Clinical as¬sistant in the department of Surgeryin Rush Medical College; Jay McKin¬ley Garner, clinical assistant in the,department of Medicine in Rush Med¬ical College; John Jacob Hesser, clin¬ical assistant in the department ofMedicine in Rush Medical College;Beatrice Russell Lovett, clinical as¬sistant in the department of Pediatricsin Rush Medical college; Earl RoacheMcCarthy, clinical assistant in thedepartment of Surgery in Rush Medi¬cal college; Clifford Porter McCul¬lough, clinical assistant in the depart¬ment of Obstetrics and Gynecology inRush Medical college; Evans WilliamPernokis, clinical assistant in the de¬partment of Medicine in Rush Medicalcollege: Arthur Sophus Juul Peterson,clinical assistant in the department ofMedicine in Rush Medical college;Earl Alfred Zaus, clinical assist.i t inthe department of Rush Medical col¬lege; John Joseph Zavertnik, clinicalassistant in the department of Pedi¬atrics in Rush Medical college; A. M.Holmquist, national resereach fellowin the Biological sciences; MackEvans, formerly of Knox college. Or¬ganist and Choir leader; W. W. Char¬ters, of the University of Pittsburgh,professor of Education in the schoolof Education; Dr. Dallas B. Phemis-ter, professor of Surgery in the Grad¬uate school of Medical Science of thcUniversity; Archer Taylor, of Wash¬ington University, St. Ixiuis, Missour:.professor of Germanic languages andliteratures; also secretary of the de¬partment; Berthold L. Ullman, of theState University of Iowa, professorof Latin; Dr. Sewall Wright of theBureau of Animal Industry, depart¬ment of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., associate professor in the Depart¬ment of Zoology; Dr. Rudolph Kamp-nreier, instructor in the department ofPathology; Professor Oscar AdolphTingelstad, of Luther College, Decor¬ah, Iowa, to give instruction in thedepartment of Education for a periodof five months, beginning February 11925, to fill the place of Prof. S. C.Parker, deceased; Dr. Edgar Cleve¬land Turner, Francis A. Hardy Fellowin Surgery in Rush Medical Collegeand assistant House Surgeon in thePresbyterian Hospital for the Winterand Spring quarters, 1925; E. 0. Lati¬mer, Sydney Walker ITT Scholar inPhysiology for three quarters. Au¬tumn, Winter and Spring, 1924-25;Fred B. Plummer. Assistant professorin the department of Geology, on atwo-thirds basis from January 1.1927; Helen Rankin Jeter, assistantprofessor in the school of Social Serv¬ice Administration, from Oct. 1, 1925:Douglas Waples. assistant professorin the college of Education, from Oct.1, 1925: Rov W. BixW. AssistantUniversity Examiner, from July 1,1925; Dr. Weh Chao Ma, Fellow ofthe Rockefeller Foundation, for theyear 1925-1926; Nathaniel Kleitman,assistant professor in the departmentAddress File is New Planto Aid fraternity RushingAn address file, giving the namesand addresses of all Freshmen en¬tering the University this Fall, is thenew plan of the Interfraternity coun¬cil to help fraternity rushing thisyear, it wa9 announced yesterday byRobert Carr, president. Another fea¬ture is a pamphlet containing the newrushing rules approved last Fall byDean Wilkins and the Council whichis now available to fraternities andinterested Freshmen.The file, which will be placed in theReynolds club and will be ready foruse Monday, will be open to anyone.It will consist of cards, which are tobe filled out today by the freshmenin their assembly, on which each manwill write his name and temporaryUniversity address to be collected bythe Council and arranged alphabetical¬ly. This plan was authorized thi9Fall by Dean Wilkins.Give Rushing RulesThe most important rushing rulesof Physiology, from October 1, 1925;On the staff of the Megiddo (Arma¬geddon) expedition; Dr. Clarence S.Fisher, Field Director from August1, 1925; Dr. Daniel F. Higgins, as¬sistant Field Director, from Aug. 1,1925; Edward L. DeLoaeh. Assistantfrom Sept. 1, 1925; George F. How-; land, Assistant, from Sept. 1, 1925;Richard Stillwell, Assistant, fromApril 1, 1926; George Forsyth, As¬sistant, from April 1, 1926; John Kel¬logg, Assistant from Nov. 1, 1925;Margarete Meta Kune, research as¬sociate in the department of Physio1-ogy, from Oct. 1, 1925; Dr. F. Lang,research assistant, to work with pro¬fessor A. A. Maximow on his re¬search work on tissue culture, fromMarch 15, 1925.CacogiaphyIs SometimesIn The PenfidQuite often aman has beenconvicted of ca-cography becausehe couldn’t makea legible markwith the pen hewas using. YourConklin Endurasays what youmean. Try oneat your favoritestore.Conklin Endura, at $5and $7, in red, black,mahogany; long orshort; clip or ring cap.A wide variety ofother Conklin pensand pencils, in rubberand all metals—priced as low as $1.00for pencils and $2.50for pens. Conklinslitquality in every one.THE CONKLIN PENMFG. CO.TOLEDO. OHIOChicago San Francisco BostonConklin,ENDURAUtumuJihoiuSy V Perpetually Guaranteeddirectly concerning fraternities are asfollows:Rushing officially starts one weekbefore the opening day of school andcontinues over a two-week period.Pledges made during the summermonths are not binding, and the Coun¬cil will take no action toward frat¬ernities violating pledging rules atthis time.All pledges made during the sum¬mer months, however, automaticallybecome binding at the beginning of theofficial rushing period.The rushee is allowed only fourdates a week with any one fraternity,with further restriction of one dateper day. (The day is divided intothree divisions, breakfast and morn¬ing, luncheon and afternoon, dinnerand evening.)On a night preceding a day onwhich classes are held, the rushee isreleased from his evening date by8:00 p. m.The penalties for violation of theserules take the form of reprimand, re¬moval of pledging, initiation, or socialprivileges, or any other penalty whichthe Council thinks it reasonable tolevy.The first meeting of the interfraiernity Council this quarter will beheld Wednesday at 7:15 in the Rey¬nolds club.WANTEDMen in their second year of college, who wish to enter;a prominent school activity with a real future.Practical business experience and desirable campusassociations may be gained.No experience necessary. Address Box O, FacultyExchange, or call at Maroon Office, Ellis Hall.Carson PirieScott&CoTO THE NEW-COMERSNow College Men and WomenINNUMERABLE problems now confront you. Amongthem, one is paramount. That is your apparel andaccessories. “What are they wearing here?,” and“Where to purchase clothes of like character?”, arequestionsthat arise in fitting out the college man’s or women’swardrobe.The attire of the college man and woman is supremelydifferent, and this store has served men and women of theUniversity and knows their wants.Apparel For Campus, Classroom,Formal and Informal WearFor Men —Broad-toed Oxfords - -Collar Attached Shirts -Soft HatsFaille Moire Neckwear -Four-Piece Suits - - -Yellow Slickers -Patent Leather Oxfords -TuxedosTopcoats$7.00$3.50$5.00$1.50$45.00$7.50$7.00$55.00$35.00For Women —Blanket CoatsRain CoatsBalbriggan Jersey Frocks - -Sports Frocks of Ascot WeaveSuede Leather Jackets - - -Georgette Crepe Party FrocksSports HatsBrogue Oxfords in Black and TanCalfskin - - $6.00$18.50$6.75$11.50$27.50$15.00$27.50$5.00Second Floor, SouthFourth Floor, Northhg30O0000000000000000O00Q0000O00000000D00O0O000OQOK30QO0E30000S3a■ 1 " 1 1 "■ 1 —1 ' ") iTjlg** ...fIM PERFECI.WELCOME/FROSH!Head theSPORTS PAGEThe DailySPORTSMaroonFOR THELATEST NEWSOF MAROONFRIDAY MORNING— - - * - •SEPTEMBER 25, 1925TEAMSAROONS DRILL FOR HARD SEASON| tStudent “C” Books Now Ready for DistributionTUITION RECEIPTMUST BE SHOWNTO RECEIVE BOOKSStagg’s Gridders Will MeetSome Strong TeamsThis SeasonAnnounce Priority Rules andApplication Dates ForExtra SeatsStudent “C” books will be placed|on sale next Monday afternoon, ac-Icording to an announcement made|by Mr. E. E. Bright, manager ofFootball Tickets Committee. Thewill continue on Tuesday after->n and beginning with Wednes-ly throughout the day. Presenta-of the tuition receipt for theltumn quarter is imperative to re-re a book.These books which include admis-Jsion to all football, basketball, basel ball, track and other athletic eventswill be available at the regular priceof ten dollars. Space for 1700holders of these books has been re¬served in the west concrete standgiving the students the choicest seatsto be had. Although this number ofreservations has been sufficient inthe past, students have been urgedto secure their books as soon as pos¬sible, as those students who do notreceive a book for the reserved sec¬tion may have to take a seat in aless favorable part of the stands andaway from the cheering section.Good For Any SeatThe C book entitles its holder tooccupy any seat within the sectionsallotted as no individual seat reser¬vations will be made.Students should make applicationfor all seat reservations in personat the office of the Football TicketsComlnittee in the main entrance ofthe Stadium at 5625 Ellis Avenue,between 9:00 and 4:30. In the al¬lotment of tickets students and alumni are given priority, although all seatassignments are made strictly by lot.In the sale of tickets for seats out¬side of cheering sections, the prefer¬ence is given to students and alumni.Applicants will be seated together ifthe applications are filed at the sametinfo. Due to the enormous numberwho seeks admission to the Wiscon¬sin games, yearly, there will prob¬ably be no public sales for theseimes and it is doubtful, accordingMr. Bright, whether there will bepublic salle for the Dartmouthle.Priority for Extra Ticket*On the Monday before the gamesith Kentucky, Ohio State, North-continued on page 8)One of the hardest schedules thatthe Maroon football team has everhad faces Stagg’s team this seasonwhen they will battle against twoof the strongest teams in the eastbesides their regular list of BigTen opponents.The schedule for this year is asfollows: ,October 3—Chicago versus Ken¬tucky.October 10—Chicago versus OhioState.October 17 — Chicago versusNorthwestern.October 24 — Chicago versusPennsylvania (at Philadelphia).October 31—Chicago versus Pur¬due.November 7—Chicago versus Illi¬nois (at Champaign).November 14 — Chicago versiDartmouth.November 21 — Chicago versusWisconsin.PLAN HOMECOMINGAT DARTMOUTHGAMEAlumni of the University will in¬augurate a new feature in this year’sfootball season when they will holdtheir First Homecoming Reunion onNovemlier 14, the day of the Chicago-Daitmouth football game.Many alumni from all sections ofthe country have already sent intheir applications to attend thegame.The Chicago Alumni Committeehave arranged an all day programto entertain their out-of-town class¬mates. This reunion will also givethe old timers an opportunity tomeet Max Mason, the new president.At 11:00 o’clock a ceremony willbe held at the new athletic fieldhouse following which the alumniwill be shown the other buildingsunder construction, the Theologybuilding, Bond Chapel, Billings Hos¬pital, Whitman Laboratory and thenew medical buildings.At noon the various organizationsand classes will hold luncheons forthe visitors.In the afternoon the school as awhole will attend the Chicago-Dart-(Continued on page 8)What’s Doing in the Grid Camps[.COACH LITTLE, new memberthe Badger team, is making greatItrides in developing a good back-leld. With Harmon at quarter, Mc-.ndrews and Barnum at halves and.*euz at full, the Badgers have alever backfield machine. Lack ofine material and the poor showinglade last year, however, leaves theWisconsin team a dark horse in theling titular battles.some radical upset takesfete, Indiana will probably be anumber in the coming “Bigi” race. Only three of the regu-of last year ’have returnedpol and lack of new materialtie Hoosiers outlook ratherHAROLD GRANGE, star of theUlini team for the past two years,has been given a vacation for thelast few days. Practically all ofCoach Zuppke’s time has been spentin drilling his team in interferenceand line blocking as he believes thatthe enemies attack will be madeagainst Grange and only clever in¬terference will enable him to per¬form the way he did last year.NORTHWESTERN’S footballteam which made such a fine show¬ing last season after being in thebackground for many years is great¬ly handicapped this fall by the smallturnout of men for daily practice.The crippling of Baker, Gustafson,Lewis and Greenberg is scrimmagehave greatly leasened Coach Thistle-thwaite’s chances in the openinggames.INTRAMURALS TODEVELOP FURTHERSAYS MOLANDERGreat Strides Are Made InInterna) Sports InPast Two YearsWith an experienced and efficientmanaging staff the Intramurals de¬partment is prepared to start a moresuccessful year than ever before, ac¬cording to Dr. O. C. Molander, ad¬viser of Intramural athletics. PaulCullom, general manager; GrahamHagey, assistant general manager,and H. A. Miller, sports secretaryare the senior members of the staff.John Meyers has been selected di¬rector for fall suports, George Wie-mer, for Winter sports, and JohnHowe for spring sport activities.„ e t department will have readyijHstribution soon its booklet tell-bf the Intramural activities, de¬partmental personnel and describingthe sports and awards.Plans New RulesThe major Fall sport will betouchball for which new rules havebeeri drafted. The minor sports willconsist of golf, horseshoes and thecross country run which will takeplace during the first part of No¬vember. Those who wish to try outfor the cross country run should ap¬ply to Dr. Reed or Dr. Molander.The director of intramural athletics,Dr. Molander, said in this connec¬tion, “I wish that all those who areplanning to enter the cross countryrun would start in training imme-miately. It cannot be run success¬fully without good, sound trainingand that is why I am emphasizing itat the very first of the quarter.”As in the past the intramural workfor the quarter has been closed withsome extensive event, it is plannedto complete the fall quarter’s ac¬tivities with a large water carnival.Executive Board to MeetIntramural activities will be offi¬cially started for the quarter andthe year with the meeting of theexecutive board which is expectedto take place with a few days.The positions of managers havebeen awarded to students who haveshown marked interest and abilityin that line and there are severalsuch positions offered at the closeof each year. Freshmen who wouldlike to try for these spots will havethe opportunity throughout the year.Because of the large number whoare expected to try out for nextyear’s sophomore managers a systemof rotating them has been devisedwhereby each freshman will have achance to learn some of the detailsof the job and may show any abilityhe may possess in that line.REMEMBERIf you can’t see the games yourselfyou can always get the latest newsin the Daily Maroon Sport page.Council Asks Student’s AidIn Distributionof TicketsvWe, as representatives of thestudent body, believe that everystudent owes the University hisloyal support in its efforts to securea fair distribution of footballtickets.The student cheering section for“C” books has again been locatedin the center of the West Stand. Inaddition, preference is given tostudent applications for regulartickets.In order to justify the confidencewhich has been placed in the stiHdent body, each member has a per¬sonal responsibility in preventingmisuse of tickets, which includesreselling at any price, even at facevalue.To violate the foregoing is toact unfairly toward the best in¬terests of our fellow-students.THE UNDERGRADUATECOUNCIL rcCharles Anderson, President.HAWKEYES LOOMAS POWERFUL* ELEVENAlthough the chances of theHawkeyes of winning a Conferencechampionship this year are notgreat, they are regarded as a teamthat will trip up many an aggrega¬tion of higher pretentions in therace for the lead.In contrast to most of the otherConference coaches, Coach Ingwer-sen has a squad which is largeenough in size, but which lacks starswho have proven themselves in for¬mer years. Ingwersen’s only hopeis in his untried men, several of whommay develop into strong offensiveand defensive players. He is work¬ing all his candidates for all theyare worth and hopes to give Hawk-eye opponents tough battles.Iowa will be the fighting underdogthis year, and may present the foot¬ball public with several upsets, atleast, that is what Coach Ingwersenis pointing his team at.Only Three Regulars BackFaced with the disquieting factthat on the football squad are onlythree men who were classed as reg¬ulars last year, Coach B. A. Ingwer-son and his five aides are whippingthe men into drills of increasingseverity. Captain Griffin, center,Romey, end and Graham, fullbackare the 1924 left-overs.The shadow of Ledree Galloway’sloss is still hanging over the Hawk-eye camp but there is nothing forthe coaches to do but comb thesquad of 62 men for other linemen.Galloway, the colored tackle whowas forced by illness to leave theUniversity last week, made an ex¬cellent impression last fall, his firstof intercollegiate football, as a cleanplayer with more than ordinary tack¬ling skill. Had he been able to con¬tinue his play, he would have come(Continued on page 8)OPENER SATURDAY WITH KENTUCKY;SCHEDULE IS HARDEST IN YEARS;PLAY DARTMOUTH, PENNSYLVANIABattle Illinois at Urbana and Pennsylvania atPhiladelphia; Five Conference Games onSchedule; Team Scrimmages for FroshInterest of University of Chicagogrid fans, both on campus and off,has been rising to fever heat at theprospect of another championshipeleven for the Maroons. Since lastWednesday, when the last openpractice was held, there has beenmuch conjecture as to Stagg’s plansand new plays for this year.Staggmen in practice this seasongive promise of a wonderful season.The schedule this year is the hard¬est the locals have had in manyyears. Although there are only fiveonference games on the list for thelocal aggregation this season, thereare three outside contests, those ofKentucky, Penn&ylvania, and Dartmouth. For the first time since theMaroons traveled east to meetPrinceton, they now have two gamesaway from home, at Illinois and atDartmouth. Indiana, usually a set¬up for the locals, has been crossedoff the Schedule—all in all forminga most difficult season.Material GoodStationery Deluxe!!Engraved names and addresses on superior bondpaper. It is new on the campus and yet it is goinglike wild free. It can be purchased from campussalesmen and saleswomen and from numerousstores in the neighborhood.P. NEFF & COMPANY276 West 43rd St . New York, N. Y.‘7H.y/ upon thisIN ORIGINALBalancing the fact that the sched¬ule is a hard one is the fact thatStagg has a wealth of material tochoose from, both on the line andin the backfield. With Wallie Marks,Bob Curley, Chuck Duval, Drain andFrancis competing with Kernwein,Stanley Rouse, Abbott and Timmefor backfield positions, the Old Manhas very little to worry about forthe next year or so concerning hisbackfield. Ineligibility throughstudy is the only thing that mightbother some members of the team.The line for this year will most like¬ly consist of veterans left over fromlast year, with Greenebaum, Bakeror Rouse at center, Yeisley and Mc¬Donough at ends, and Henderson,Captain, at tackle. Henderson hasbeen playing his usual steady gameand shows promise of being entirelycapable of leading a championshipcalibre eleven such as the presentMaroon team looks like it will be.Hibben OutAlthough Pokrass, Greenebaum,Neff and Hibben were out of uni¬form for a day or so this last week,they are all back now, with the ex¬ception of Hibben, who sustained asprained ankle early in the week.Today’s scrimmage for the edifica¬tion of the freshmen should showsome interesting bits of football.Probably there will be no intricateplays run off, but there will beplenty of action, as both backfieldswill be very strong.So far, the open practice hasbrought out the passing ability ofthe Staggmen. Chuck Duval, whowas famous for his passes whileplaying for Hyde Park High School,has shown marked ability in thistype of attack. Marks has alsoshown his effectiveness in this lineduring the scrimmages, as well nsbeing particular skillful on offtackle -drives. He picks his holescarefully, and is especially skillfulin eluding the secondary defence.While his passes, intrinsically speak¬ing, are hard to improve upon, theireffective completion is greatly dueto the work of Yeisley, Drain, andMcDonough, who function upon thereceiving ends.Aerial Attack ImprovesIn the scrimmage last Monday,Gene Francis earned the honor ofmaking the first touchdown of theMaroon grid season. The ball wascarried by him from the 3-yard line,after a beautiful 50-yard marchdown the field, in which Marks, Du¬val, Drain and Francis played theleading parts. They bucked theline, rounded the ends, and passedthe ball for effective gains of from5 to 15 yards several times.With the first game of the seasononly a week away, Stagg is graduallyrounding the team into shape. Al¬though all indications point to thedefeat of Kentucky next Saturday,the southern school will probablybring up a very strong team and,being pointed for this game, willput up a hard fight. It will be re¬membered that last year Missouripulled a surprise by defeating thehome team. Even though the scorewas only 3-0, the loss was keenlyfelt by Maroon fans. This year theteam intends to start the new seasonwith a victory.SUBSCRIPTION BLANKCirculation Manager,THE DAILY MAROON,Box O, Faculty Exchange.I am enclosing $Rates: $3.00 a Year, $1.50 a Quarter.Mail: 50c a Quarter or $3.00 aYear Extra.Free Delivery) Anywhere On CampusNAMESTREETCITY AND STATEj,. ,,wW m '*• • . • 1!THE DAILY MAROON, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1925^ jybistle“LISTEN DAD—”With dismal groans the father wroteAnother good-sized check;Tuition costs and locker feesHad left his funds a wreck—And as he handed out the cashHe murmered in a daze,“I must agree that now I seeAn education pays!”AND THE GRIND is on again. Anew era for some of us—and newsuits for most of us. . . . New faces,new buildings, new debts. . . .Fountain pens, class schedules, andshiny black portfolios. . . . Lateron they will find a use for their port¬folios in carrying their gym suits toand from their fraternity house.ANNOUNCEMENTEXTRAORDINAIREAll members of the Fall freshmanclass who admitted, while filling outtheir registration blanks, that theirfavorite magazines really were theSaturday Evening Post, Whiz-Bang,or the Argosy-Allstory rather thanthe National Geographical Review,Harper’s Monthly, or the LiteraryDigest, are invited to confer with us,if we may revive the old bromide, inthe telephone booth by Cobb Hall.Similarly those of the class of ’29who did not virtuously attributetheir reason for coming to collegeto an overpowering thirst for knowl¬edge, or a burning desire for thebetter things of life, and confessedinstead that it was because the restof the gang were doing it, can lookfor each other on the side entranceto the Phi Beta Kappa house.SOLACEThe satisfaction ofBeing acquainted on campusIs the realization that nobodyCan back you in a cornerTo tell you all about theWonderful time they had onTheir vacation!NOTORIOUS in the Frosh class isthe determined individual who reg¬istered in the University so as to beassured of a ticket to the Chicago-Illini game.“Well, old man, how do you likeyour new lodgings? Doesn’t all thatnoise disturb your sleep?”“Nope. They told me that I canget used to it in a few nights andso for the first week or two 1 amstaying at the Chicago Beach.ON the whole the main differencebetween a first quarter freshmanand one who is finishing his firstyear is that when the newcomer getsan official invitation to visit theDean he fears something is wrong—the veteran knows.HONI SOITThey approached the water foun¬tain simultaneously. With nativecourtesy he stepped aside and heldthe lever while she bent over thebubbling cup.“Oh, hell,” she whispered softly.“What’s that?” he askedamazedly.“Nothing at all,” she answered asshe gaily tripped away, "That’smerely the Curse of Drink!”SENTIMENT among the upperclassmen is rapidly turning againstthe University system of having thefreshmen on campus a week aheadof the rest, thereby giving the froshboys a headstart in getting ac¬quainted with the new women.INCIDENTALLY the question hasbeen brought up as to the advisabil¬ity of Yale putting up such an enor¬mous library, when, after all, it isnot a co-educational school.JUDGING from a summary exam¬ination of the Varsity candidates itmight be well to insist with Sir Tobythat the struggle for positions isbased in some cases oti the survival,not of the fittest, but of the fattestTERRIBLE TURK.(Continued from Sport Page)mouth game. Between the halves ofthe game the fraternities will stagea frolic.Following the game, the Home¬coming celebration will be held atBartlett gymnasium with the “OldMan” and the team taking part. Anold time “pep” session will be heldwith refreshments later.The evening will feature frater¬nity and organization dinners anddances.(Continued from Sport Page)close to equaling the record of DukeSlater, famous colored tackle of the1921 championship team.Makeup of Team UndecidedMen are being shifted in all direc¬tions but the most regular line-upyet played places Captain Griffen atcenter; Raffensperger, secondaryletter man and Keel, sophomore atguards; Krasuski, letter man but nota regular in 1924 and Rodawig, an¬other sophomore at tackles, andRomey, “I” man with Smith or Rice,secondary letter wearers at ends.The search for a quarterback resultsin the alternating trial of Hogan,“I” man, Schirmer, “I” man andCuhel, the sophomore track star.Graham and Fry, both two year vet¬erans have been at halves whileKutsch has received much attentionat full. Kutsch is one of the mostpromising plungers and passers fromthe ranks of the 1924 freshmen.(Continued from Sport Page)western, and Purdue, the best seatsavailable for the game will be setaside to be sold to students only onthat day. For the games with Penn¬sylvania, Illinois, Dartmouth, andWisconsin application for ticketsmust be made at the football officebefore the week of the game andmay be called for during that week.STUDY MUSIC!ORCHESTRA REHEARSED5489 Woodlawn AvenueThis Free Copyis for the purpose of acquainting you withThe Daily Maroon of the coming school year.BUY SUBSCRIPTIONSFROM CAMPUS SALESPEOPLECOME TO FI-HS 1or -Use Subscription Blank on Page 7.TheSlickervStudeHi, fellers! ({■!», too)Meet fValhThe Eversharp Kidtie’s the cutepledge button for theRegular GuysAsk for him et anyl'vert harp andWahl Pea counterandthe CleverSure, Billy discoveredher. Brought her to the^ hop, too. But Columbus\ never did own Amer¬ica, much. Foxy Philipfound out it was herbirthday, and he slippeddown town and got hera darling new Wahl Pen.You know the kind—slim, cylindrical, goldenbeauty. You cant blamethe gal, can you?One like Foxy Philipbought—fo.ooWAHL PENEVERSHARfS Write Hand Pd®<§><§><§>®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®BOOKOPEN UNTL9PM-13 11EAST 57 tnSTREETSTORENEAR THE U«tC-HEADQUARTERS FOR STUDENT SUPPLIESNew andSecond-handBOOKSFor all U. of C.CoursesHere you will find the largest stock of new and second¬hand university hooks in the city of Chicago. Those who pur¬chase their books here thru the year find the saving well worthwhile. BUY your TEXT BOOKS where you have a choice ofthe largest stock.aUniversity ofChicago Station¬ery for your firstletter home—Letthe folks hackhome know youare here at theUniversityPenHeadquartersHere!S3For your personal station¬ary, desk fixings, pens, pen¬cils—everything that goeswith writing—come here,where you’ll find the widestpossible stock to select from.We don’t promise you“something for nothing,”but we do guarantee youthis—First Quality Suppliesat prices as low, if not moreso, than any other place inthe city.Fountain Pens is one of ourspecialties . All standardmakes, Parker, Waterman,Shaeffer, Conklin and Ever-sharp. All styles, all sizes.If your pen is out of com¬mission, bring it here. Letus examine it. Let us cleanit while-you-wait and showyou how to keep it clean.If a new part is needed wehave it or can quickly get it.A small charge only for re¬pairs. Free filling station,too! Step up to the pencounter and give your pena fresh drink any time youare passing.University ofChicago Pen¬nant Arm Bands,Pillows, TableCovers—Youwill also wantbook ands anda Desk Lamp—Everything foryour roomServiceanWe maintain for your convenience a Postal Station,American Express Agency, Public Telephone Booths, anda Packing and Shipping Service. Our Typewriter Depart¬ment specializes in solving your typewriter problems eco¬nomically and efficiently. Every make of machine newor rebuilt can be secured thru this department eitheron cash or time payments. All makes of typewriters arerepaired and rebuilt. Our Book Section is the largestof its kind in the Middle W est, supplying both New andSecond-hand. Any book published in any language canbe secured thru us; we also specialize in searching forrare or out-of-print books. Our Reference Section —Books About Books — is at your disposal at any time.Our Athletic Goods Section stocks all Gym Equipmentneeded by both men and women. We have here a largeMail Order Department which is shipping out, every hourin the day, anything from a small note book to a com¬plete school library. These and many other services arepart of our daily routine. Don’t forget that this storeis open day and evening for your convenience from 8A. M. to 9 P. M. thruout the year.Come In And Get AcquaintedWoodworth’s Book(1311 E. 57TH ST., Between Kimbark and KenwoodTwo Blocks East of the Tower All Student Supplies•fl . i . M ...